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Submission + - 1 Patient, 7 Tumors and 100 Billion Cells Equal 1 Striking Recovery (nytimes.com)

schwit1 writes: The remarkable recovery of a woman with advanced colon cancer, after treatment with cells from her own immune system, may lead to new options for thousands of other patients with colon or pancreatic cancer, researchers are reporting. Her treatment was the first to successfully target a common cancer mutation that scientists have tried to attack for decades. Until now, that mutation has been bulletproof, so resistant to every attempt at treatment that scientists have described it as ‘undruggable.'

Submission + - Google Global Cache coming to Cuba

lpress writes: The Associated Press reports that on Monday Eric Schmidt will be in Havana to sign a deal bringing Google Global Cache to Cuba. This will be a win for the Cuban people, Google and the Obama administration.

Submission + - Arista Infringed on More Cisco Network Patents, Rules U.S. Trade Judge (fortune.com)

schwit1 writes: Arista Networks used rival Cisco Systems' network device technology in its ethernet switches without permission, a U.S. trade judge ruled on Friday, handing Cisco yet another win in a sprawling legal battle over patents between the two companies. The judge, MaryJoan McNamara of the U.S. International Trade Commission in Washington, said that Arista had infringed two patents owned by Cisco. The ruling, which must be reviewed by the full commission over the next few months, could lead to an order banning the import of Arista's products into the United States.

Submission + - Can't Hear in Noisy Places is a real medical condition (wsj.com)

turkeydance writes: called Hidden Hearing Loss:
Now there’s growing evidence that the causes of problems processing speech amid noise are different than the causes of problems hearing sound. Scientists believe exposure to loud noises can erode the brain’s ability to listen selectively and decode words, without causing traditional hearing damage. Difficulty understanding speech amid noise can set in long before traditional hearing loss.
Hearing loss in adults is usually associated with damage to the tiny hair cells that line the inner ear and transfer sound signals to nerve fibers that lead to the brain. Aging, trauma and noise exposure can all cause those hair cells to deteriorate.

New research suggests that the synapses connecting the hair cells to nerve fibers are even more vulnerable and suffer permanent damage long before the hair cells deteriorate, bringing about the difficulties in selective listening.

Submission + - Twitter Cuts API Access for Surveillance Tool That Let Police Spy on Activists

blottsie writes: Twitter has cut ties with a third social network surveillance firm, citing company policies intended to safeguard users against the surreptitious collection of data by law enforcement agencies, according to an exclusive report from the Daily Dot.

The severed contract follows Twitter nullifying the commercial data agreements of two other leading social-network-surveillance firms, Geofeedia and Snaptrends.

The company, Ontario-based Media Sonar, brazenly advertised its software in private talks with police as useful for monitoring activists across multiple social networks, documents obtained through open-records requests show.

Submission + - Verizon Refuses To Brick the Samsung Note 7 (theverge.com)

caferace writes: According to this article at The Verge, Verizon has refused to push out the Samsung "No-Charge" update.

"...Today, Samsung announced an update to the Galaxy Note 7 that would stop the smartphone from charging, rendering it useless unless attached to a power charger. Verizon will not be taking part in this update because of the added risk this could pose to Galaxy Note 7 users that do not have another device to switch to. We will not push a software upgrade that will eliminate the ability for the Note 7 to work as a mobile device in the heart of the holiday travel season. We do not want to make it impossible to contact family, first responders or medical professionals in an emergency situation.."

Submission + - Bad Neighborhoods Theory Applies to Bots, Also (securityledger.com)

chicksdaddy writes: It turns out that the “bad neighborhoods” theory (http://ns.umich.edu/new/releases/8588) applies to computers, as well as people.

Researchers from the firm Recorded Future said that the company has developed what it described as a “support vector machine” model to analyze contextual open source intelligence (OSINT) data on malicious online behavior. (https://www.recordedfuture.com/artificial-intelligence-cyber-defense/) That is cross referenced to “CIDR neighborhoods” – blocks of Internet addresses identified using Classless Internet Domain Routing. The AI's output is a predictive risk score for specific IP addresses that are likely to turn to crime.

So far the results are promising. In one case, Recorded Future tagged an IP address as likely to be used in an attack a full 10 days before it actually was. In an analysis of 500 previously unseen IPs with a predictive risk scores that suggested they would become malicious, 25% turned up on independent, open source lists of malicious IP addresses within 7 days, the company said. By comparison, just %.02 percent of the entire population of global (IPV4) IP addresses are marked as malicious at any time, the company said.

As for why, the explanation that Recorded Future gives sounds similar to the findings of sociological and psychologic research on the effects of bad neighborhoods. The notion there is that “bad neighborhoods” – characterized by crime, poverty and a scarcity of good role models and economic opportunities – can affect the cognitive development of children and even of the children of those children.(https://psmag.com/growing-up-poor-has-effects-on-your-children-even-if-you-escape-poverty-df11e668378a#.a27begtv0)

In the case of Internet connected systems that are destined to ‘go bad,’ the issue is proximity to computers that are involved in malicious activity, Staffan Truve, CTO, Recorded Future told The Security Ledger.(https://securityledger.com/2016/12/bad-neighborhoods-predict-which-computers-turn-to-crime-also/)

Hackers and botnet operators are rational, economic beings, he observes. That means that they will eventually use infrastructure that they rent for a purpose (like virtual systems in a data center that might be rented out for use in a denial of service attack). By analyzing the “closeness” of IPV4 addresses, Recorded Future found a predictor of future malicious activity. Proximity to one of those bad apples makes it more likely that you’re a bad apple, also – or soon will be, he said. “There’s an underlying logic, which is that the neighborhood (the system) is in will be the core part of whether it becomes malicious, but also how your neighbors are talked about.”

Submission + - Dinosaur Tail With Feathers Found Perfectly Preserved In Amber (bbc.com)

dryriver writes: The BBC reports: The tail of a feathered dinosaur has been found perfectly preserved in amber from Myanmar. The one-of-a-kind discovery helps put flesh on the bones of these extinct creatures, opening a new window on the biology of a group that dominated Earth for more than 160 million years. Examination of the specimen suggests the tail was chestnut brown on top and white on its underside. "This is the first time we've found dinosaur material preserved in amber," co-author Ryan McKellar, of the Royal Saskatchewan Museum in Canada, told the BBC News website. Co-author Prof Mike Benton, from the University of Bristol, added: "It's amazing to see all the details of a dinosaur tail — the bones, flesh, skin, and feathers — and to imagine how this little fellow got his tail caught in the resin, and then presumably died because he could not wrestle free."

Submission + - US Life Expectancy Declines For the First Time Since 1993 (washingtonpost.com)

An anonymous reader writes: For the first time in more than two decades, life expectancy for Americans declined last year — a troubling development linked to a panoply of worsening health problems in the United States. Rising fatalities from heart disease and stroke, diabetes, drug overdoses, accidents and other conditions caused the lower life expectancy revealed in a report released Thursday by the National Center for Health Statistics. In all, death rates rose for eight of the top 10 leading causes of death. The new report raises the possibility that major illnesses may be eroding prospects for an even wider group of Americans. Its findings show increases in “virtually every cause of death. It’s all ages,” said David Weir, director of the health and retirement study at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. Over the past five years, he noted, improvements in death rates were among the smallest of the past four decades. “There’s this just across-the-board [phenomenon] of not doing very well in the United States.” Overall, life expectancy fell by one-tenth of a year, from 78.9 in 2014 to 78.8 in 2015, according to the latest data. The last time U.S. life expectancy at birth declined was in 1993, when it dropped from 75.6 to 75.4, according to World Bank data. The overall death rate rose 1.2 percent in 2015, its first uptick since 1999. More than 2.7 million people died, about 45 percent of them from heart disease or cancer.

Submission + - AT&T To Cough Up $88 Million For 'Cramming' Mobile Customer Bills (networkworld.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Some 2.7 million AT&T customers will share $88 million in compensation for having had unauthorized third-party charges added to their mobile bills, the Federal Trade Commission announced this morning. The latest shot in the federal government’s years-long battle against such abuses, these refunds will represent the most money ever recouped by victims of what is known as “mobile cramming,” according to the FTC. From an FTC press release: "Through the FTC’s refund program, nearly 2.5 million current AT&T customers will receive a credit on their bill within the next 75 days, and more than 300,000 former customers will receive a check. The average refund amount is $31. [...] According to the FTC’s complaint, AT&T placed unauthorized third-party charges on its customers’ phone bills, usually in amounts of $9.99 per month, for ringtones and text message subscriptions containing love tips, horoscopes, and 'fun facts.' The FTC alleged that AT&T kept at least 35 percent of the charges it imposed on its customers." The matter with AT&T was originally made public in 2014 and also involved two companies that actually applied the unauthorized charges, Tatto and Acquinity.

Submission + - Red Hat Container Platform OpenShift Dedicated Launches On Google Cloud

An anonymous reader writes: Red Hat has announced the general availability of OpenShift Dedicated across Google Cloud Platform, bringing the open source container platform as a managed service to customers using Google’s cloud infrastructure. Google product manager Martin Buhr said that the move will help accelerate the adoption of Kubernetes, containers and cloud-native application patterns. Users will be able to access Google’s platform which is already optimised for container technologies. There will also be the added benefit of tapping into Google’s portfolio of products, including data analytics tools, machine learning, compute, network and storage services.

Submission + - Remarkable New Theory Says There's No Gravity (bigthink.com)

Jeff Socia writes: Gravity is something all of us are familiar with from our first childhood experiences. You drop something — it falls. And the way physicists have described gravity has also been pretty consistent — it’s considered one of the four main forces or “interactions” of nature and how it works has been described by Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity all the way back in 1915.

But Professor Erik Verlinde, an expert in string theory from the University of Amsterdam and the Delta Institute of Theoretical Physics, thinks that gravity is not a fundamental force of nature because it's not always there. Instead it’s “emergent” — coming into existence from changes in microscopic bits of information in the structure of spacetime.

Submission + - Zeus Still Alive and Well With New Variant Floki Bot

Trailrunner7 writes: Malware gangs, like sad wedding bands bands, love to play the hits. And one of the hits they keep running back over and over is the Zeus banking Trojan, which has been in use for many years in a number of different forms. Researchers have unearthed a new piece of malware called Floki Bot that is based on the venerable Zeus source code and is being used to infect point-of-sale systems, among other targets.

Flashpoint conducted the analysis of Floki Bot with Cisco’s Talos research team, and the two organizations said that the author behind the bot maintains a presence on a number of different underground forums, some of which are in Russian or other non-native languages for him. Kremez said that attackers sometimes will participate in foreign language forums as a way to expand their knowledge.

Along with its PoS infection capability, Floki Bot also has a feature that allows it to use the Tor network to communicate.

Submission + - Inside The NYPD's Attempt To Build Community Trust Through Twitter (backchannel.com)

mirandakatz writes: When the NYPD rolled out its Twitter presence a couple years back, it didn't go so smoothly: the @NYPDNews account tweeted a request: “Do you have a photo with a member of the NYPD? Tweet us & tag it #myNYPD,” and by midnight the same day, more than 70,000 people had responded decrying police brutality. At Backchannel, Susan Crawford looks at the department's attempt to use Twitter to rebuild community trust, noting that while the NYPD has a long ways to go, any opening up of communication is an improvement on the traditionally tight-lipped culture.

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