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Submission + - How I Stopped Trying to Upgrade My Life (backchannel.com) 1

mirandakatz writes: In our upgrade-obsessed world, it’s easy to conclude that happiness comes from new and shiny things. As Google X's Hans Peter Brondmo writes, that sort of thinking is wrong. At Backchannel, he details his path toward accepting "Life 1.0," rather than constantly chasing the next upgrade. He writes, "My perceived need for an upgrade was driven by data that reinforced, everywhere I turned, that upgrades are it. More, newer, ever-shinier things will make you even happier. Upgrade your life to Life 7.0 and THAT will bring you the joy and happiness you think others have. I mostly knew it was bullshit, but when the stimuli is overwhelming and it’s continuously training your learners that upgrades in their many forms lead to greater happiness, then after a while it messes with your algorithms, skewing your truth and values."

Submission + - Weaponized Narrative Is the New Battlespace

Rocky Mudbutt writes: Weaponized Narrative Is the New Battlespace and the U.S. is in the unaccustomed position of being seriously behind its adversaries.

An article from defenseone makes the point that we are shifting to a post-factual world.

Far from being simply a U.S. or U.K. phenomenon, shifts to âoepost-factualismâ can be seen in Poland, Hungary, Turkey, France, and the Philippines, among other democracies. Russia, whose own political culture is deeply post-factual and indeed post-modern, is now ably constructing ironic, highly cynical, weaponized narratives that were effective in the Ukrainian invasion, and are now destabilizing the Baltic states and the U.S. election process.

This comes from:

  • Brad Allenby Co-director of The Weaponized Narrative Initiative
  • Joel Garreau Co-director of The Weaponized Narrative Initiative

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Why Are Many Products Deliberately Aimed At Younger Consumers? 3

dryriver writes: Everyone who is currently over 35 or so is familiar with a certain phenomenon: You've spent your childhood, teens and twenties buying everything "cool" — music, films, books, toys, clothing, computer games, comic books, PC hardware, game consoles, software, all sorts of consumer electronics. During this time, you and the rest of your generation kept the companies that produce this stuff flush with cash — it was your steady buying and consuming that allowed these companies to grow really big and thrive in financial terms. Now, suddenly, you are outside the target demographic for these same companies — they are still producing "stuff", but it is now aimed at new children, teens and tweens. When you look around for products made for a 35+ year old person, you find that almost everybody producing stuff is obsessed with serving a younger, less discerning demographic that is spending its parents' cash, just as you once spent your parents' cash. Why is this? Shouldn't products you "grew up with" also "grow with you as you grow" — accompany you into older age in a more mature, developed and sophisticated form in other words? Or is commerce all about get-their-money-while-they-are-young-and-impressionable?

Submission + - Brianna Wu Is A Harsh Mistress (washingtontimes.com) 2

Applehu Akbar writes: A transgender-issues activist and Democratic candidate for Congress says the advent of the space tourism industry could give private corporations a “frightening amount of power” to destroy the Earth with rocks because of the Moon’s military importance.
Brianna Wu, a prominent “social justice warrior” in the “Gamergate” controversy who now is running for the House seat in Massachusetts’ 8th District, suggested in a since-deleted tweet that companies could drop rocks from the Moon.
“The moon is probably the most tactically valuable military ground for earth,” the tweet said. “Rocks dropped from there have power of 100s of nuclear bombs.”

Submission + - Using game theory to predict likely targets for election cyber attacks (vanderbilt.edu)

Science_afficionado writes: A computer science professor is using game theory to predict which polling places or districts are the most likely targets for cyber hackers trying to influence election results. Yevgeniy Vorobeychik at Vanderbilt University has developed an algorithm that identifies potential targets by "thinking" like attackers. Election authorities could use it either during elections to focus protection efforts on electronic voting machines in certain areas, or they could run the algorithm on the results after the election but before results are certified.

Submission + - Driverless Truck Startup Is Putting Human Drivers to Work (fortune.com)

reddi-phreddi writes: Starsky Robotics CEO and co-founder Stefan Seltz-Axmacher wants to solve the primary logistical challenge for the trucking industry by taking drivers off the road and putting them in an office. Its business model and approach is unlike other self-driving truck companies like Embark and Otto that have emerged in the past year.

Submission + - Why Your Boss Will Crush Your Innovative Ideas (bbc.com)

dryriver writes: BBC Capital explores why good ideas people have in the workplace almost never reach the top decision makers in a company: "Surely you’ve heard the plea from on high at your company: we want more innovation, from everyone at every level. Your boss might even agree with the sentiment — because, of course, who doesn’t like innovation? It’s good for everyone, right? Yet when it comes to innovating at your job it might be better to lower your expectations — and then some. Your idea is far more likely to die on your boss’s desk than it is to reach the CEO. It’s not that top managers don’t want new ideas. Rather, it’s the people around you — your colleagues, your manager — who are unlikely to bend toward change. “Companies are almost forced to say that they are changing these days,” says Lynn Isabella. But, “it’s not organisations that resist change; people resist,” says Isabella. “The people have to see what’s in it for them.”

Submission + - YouTube Unveils YouTube TV, Its Live TV Streaming Service (techcrunch.com)

An anonymous reader writes: After a year of rumors, YouTube is finally drawing back the curtain on its latest play for entertainment industry domination — a live TV service. Distinct from YouTube Red, the new service YouTube TV, which has been in the works for years at Google’s internet video behemoth, has quietly been inking contracts with media companies to distribute their content on its TV service. The service is fairly low-cost, with a family of six accounts available for $35 per month, and no long-term contract required. Earlier reports from the Wall Street Journal set pricing for the service somewhere between $25 and $40 per month. However, it will only launch in markets where it can offer full, live local broadcast feeds. That’s planned for the months ahead, but YouTube didn’t offer an exact date. “We decided to create an offering that would give them all of these can’t miss live moments,” said YouTube exec Robert Kinsel of YouTube TV’s offering. He explained that YouTube has partnered with all of the broadcast networks, in order to offer “comprehensive national coverage with ABC, NBC, CBS, Fox all included.” In addition, the service is getting USA, FX, FreeForm, MSNBC, CNBC, Fox News, and Fox Business. ShowTime is available for an additional fee. Missing, however, is HBO. For sports fans, the service includes national coverage from ESPN, FoxSports, and NBC SportsNet. Also offered are regional sports networks from Fox and Comcast, SEC Network, Big Ten and ESPNU. Fox Soccer Plus is available as an add-on. In addition, YouTube TV includes YouTube Red’s 28 original series.

 

Submission + - Free Software Foundation: Tim Berners-Lee is wrong to think he's powerless (defectivebydesign.org)

Atticus Rex writes: On Monday, W3C (World Wide Web Consortium) director Tim Berners-Lee released a post defending his decision to allow Netflix, Microsoft, Apple and Google to enshrine DRM in Web standards, arguing that blocking it would be pointless. Zak Rogoff, FSF campaigns manager, writes in the response:

"As Director of the W3C (World Wide Web Consortium), Berners-Lee has the ability to block [the DRM proposal] from ratification as an official Web standard... Of course, a refusal to ratify could not immediately stop the use of DRM, but it could meaningfully weaken the position of DRM in the court of public opinion, and put EME proponents Netflix, Microsoft, Apple, and Google on notice that a very prominent figure was willing to stand up to them on behalf of users. Changes in society's technological infrastructure require political movements, not just technological arguments, and political movements benefit greatly from the support of prominent figures."

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Help with amateur digital forensics 6

elocinanna writes: Long-time reader, first-time writer. My friend was abused as a child by a family member, including but not limited to the creation of illegal videos. There's reason to believe she wasn't the only one involved and also that he shared illegal materials with others.

The same friend will be visiting the abuser's house soon and will have access to his computers. We don't need to find evidence exactly, but just enough to make a tip-off to the police worthwhile. I've suggested she looks for file-sharing programmes and Onion browser as things which might suggest there's evidence hidden away somewhere, and try to access emails for forum accounts etc.

Given a day with such a person's computer, what would you search for? We know how to search for *.jpeg, but assuming he's careful, what else can we do? Thank you.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: What Would Happen If ALL Software Ran On ALL Platforms?

dryriver writes: We live in a computing world where the OS you use — Windows, OS X, Linux, Android, iOS, others — often determines what software can and cannot be run on a given electronic device. (Let us pretend for a moment that emulators and other options don't exist). What if — magically — such a thing as as Universally Compatible Software Application were possible. Software, in other words, that is magically capable of running on ANY electronic device equipped with enough CPU, GPU and Memory capacity to run the software in a usable way. Example: 3D CAD software that runs on Windows 14, Playstation 7, an Android Smartphone, Nintendo's latest handheld gaming device and an Ubuntu PC in exactly the same way with no compatibility problems whatsoever occurring. What would and would not change in such a computing world? And does anyone think such a thing as Universally Compatible Software Application will EVER be possible or feasible from a technical standpoint?

Submission + - Jolla Sailfish OS Will Be Basis For National Chinese Mobile Operating System

Mickeycaskill writes: The Sailfish China Consortium has gained the exclusive rights and licence to develop a Chinese operating system based on Sailfish, a mobile OS built on the MeeGo platform abandoned by Nokia when it moved to Windows Phone.

Russia is also using Sailfish to build a national mobile OS in a bid to reduce its reliance on Western technology and reduce the risk of foreign surveillance.

Jolla claimed that there have been many attempts to build a national OS on Android but these had been unsuccessful because of Google’s control over the code.

The Finnish company has released its own smartphone, also called Jolla, running Sailfish but has always intended to offer it to other manufacturers. The first of these, the Intex Aqua Fish, made its debut in July last year.

But now owners of Sony’s mobile devices will be able to run Sailfish on their device through the Sony Open Devices Program, Jolla confirmed at Mobile World Congress (MWC) in Barcelona, where it is showing an Xperia X with the software installed.

Submission + - Zorin OS 12.1 Ubuntu-based Linux distro is here for Windows switchers (betanews.com)

BrianFagioli writes: If you have been thinking of switching to Linux, there are a lot of choices nowadays, but there is one such operating system designed for that purpose. Zorin OS aims to be familiar to Windows users, while its Ubuntu base makes it easy to manage and install packages. Today, Zorin OS reaches version 12.1. While it is not a massive update by any means, existing users should definitely upgrade. If you have never tried Zorin OS before, now is as good a time as any.

"We are pleased to announce the release of Zorin OS 12.1. This new release brings together the latest software updates, bug fixes, new desktop features, performance enhancements and hardware support. Zorin OS 12.1 introduces an updated hardware enablement stack. The newly-included Linux kernel 4.8 as well as an updated X server graphics stack adds compatibility for newer computers and hardware in Zorin OS," says The Zorin OS Team.

Submission + - $5 Raspberry Pi Zero Updated With Wi-Fi And Bluetooth

Mickeycaskill writes: Mini computer maker Raspberry Pi has celebrated its fifth birthday with the launch of a brand new PC: The Raspberry Pi Zero W.

A variation of the Raspberry Pi Zero – which costs $5 (£4) and sold out in just 24 hours when it was launched in November 2015 – the Zero W comes with 802.11n wireless LAN and Bluetooth 4.0 connectivity and will set you back the princely sum of $10 (£8).

The original Pi Zero has already grown a camera connector since its release, but functionality has been further boosted in the Zero W with the addition of the same Cypress CYW43438 wireless chip used in the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B.

As well as the camera and connectivity options, the full list of features includes: a 1GHz single-core CPU, 512MB RAM, a mini-HDMI port and micro-USB power.

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