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Submission + - Steps to get a Trademark Registration. (trademarkspatentslawyer.com)

Trademark Lawyer writes: Registration with the Canadian Internet Registration Authority (CIRA) and the Canadian Intellectual Property Office (CIPO) are both essential forms of legal protection. Trademark registration offers a monopoly over your domain name preventing competitors from using the same or even a similar name.

Submission + - Spying on Students in the Classroom (eff.org)

schwit1 writes: It seems a day doesn’t go by without another report of a company monitoring what we do on the Internet and selling that data to generate more revenue. And now the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has examined what happens to the data that's collected from students using technology in the classroom. They released the results of an extensive survey covering students in grades K-12.

What they found was that little work has been done to protect the privacy of the student information that is collected from both the classroom and from using the online software the schools issue for use at home on the students' own devices. They found that while many school districts have embraced technology and all of the benefits it can bring to the schools and students, often little thought has been given to one of the unintended consequences of this: the students' privacy.

The study was very extensive and took two years to complete. Virtually everything was examined, including what's being done along each point from the suppliers of hardware and software and the cloud services, to the schools and the students. They found that lots of data is being collected without permission and that it's easy for outside companies to access the data. They also discovered that there's little to prevent suppliers from sharing data with others, including advertisers.

Submission + - DNA-Based Test Can Spot Cancer Recurrence a Year Before Conventional Scans (theguardian.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A revolutionary blood test has been shown to diagnose the recurrence of cancer up to a year in advance of conventional scans in a major lung cancer trial. The test, known as a liquid biopsy, could buy crucial time for doctors by indicating that cancer is growing in the body when tumors are not yet detectable on CT scans and long before the patient becomes aware of physical symptoms. It works by detecting free-floating mutated DNA, released into the bloodstream by dying cancer cells. In the trial of 100 lung cancer patients, scientists saw precipitous rises in tumor DNA in the blood of patients who would go on to relapse months, or even a year, later. In the latest trial, reported in the journal Nature, 100 patients with non-small cell lung cancer were followed from diagnosis through surgery and chemotherapy, having blood tests every six to eight weeks. By analyzing the patchwork of genetic faults in cells across each tumor, scientists created personalized genomic templates for each patient. This was then compared to the DNA floating in their blood, to assess whether a fraction of it matched that seen in their tumor.

Submission + - Universal inter-thread synchronization 10 times faster than any in standard C++ (codeproject.com)

An anonymous reader writes: C++ is known as one of the fastest languages, which includes only the most popular and fast features. The lock code is proposed, which is 10 times faster than any of the mutexes in the standard C++ library and is also universal. It is detailed and clear even for beginners, memory barriers are described and how to build with them the most optimized multi-threaded algorithms. Describes how to use all the resources of modern processors x86_64 and ARMv7/v8 (LL/SC).

Submission + - Apple Is In Talks To Launch Its Own Venmo (recode.net)

An anonymous reader writes: The company has recently held discussions with payments industry partners about introducing its own Venmo competitor, according to multiple sources familiar with the talks. The service would allow iPhone owners to send money digitally to other iPhone owners, these people said. One source familiar with the plans told Recode they expect the company to announce the new service later this year. Another cautioned that an announcement and launch date may not yet be set. The new Apple product would compete with offerings from big U.S. banks as well as PayPal, its millennial-popular subsidiary Venmo, as well as Square Cash in the increasingly competitive world of digital money-transfers. Apple has also recently held discussions with Visa about creating its own pre-paid cards that would run on the Visa debit network and which would be tied to the new peer-to-peer service, sources told Recode. People would be able to use the Apple cards to spend money sent to them through the new service, without having to wait for it to clear to their bank account.

Submission + - SmartThings Has Access to Tens of Thousands of Private GitHub Repos (reddit.com)

An anonymous reader writes: After Samsung acquired SmartThings for a cool $200 million a few years ago, the company has been aggressively pushing for developers to enable GitHub access. At one time, the company boasted it had more than 20,000 developers on the platform. What most of those developers do not know is that the SmartThings integration is a blanket read on all repositories in your account. Why GitHub makes this an option, I have no idea. With all the turmoil over at Samsung lately, do you want that company to have access to all of your GitHub repositories? Have you checked what else has access to your repos lately?

Submission + - Google Loses Top Hardware Executive

randomErr writes: David Foster joined Alphabet Inc.'s Google in October as part of its aggressive hardware effort has left the company. As the vice president of hardware product development he worked on the launch of the Pixel smartphone and Home speaker. Both of which are competitors to the Amazon Echo, Foster's previous employer. Google will not comment on why he is leaving.

Submission + - Backdoor Could Allow Company To Shut Down 70% Of All Bitcoin Mining Operations (bleepingcomputer.com)

An anonymous reader writes: An anonymous security researcher has published details on a vulnerability named "Antbleed," which the author claims is a remote backdoor affecting Bitcoin mining equipment sold by Bitmain, the largest vendor of crypto-currency mining hardware on the market. The backdoor code works by reporting mining equipment details to Bitmain servers, who can reply by instructing the customer's equipment to shut down.

Supposedly introduced as a crude DRM to control illegal equipment, the company forgot to tell anyone about it, and even ignored a user who reported it last fall. One of the Bitcoin Core developers claims that if such command would ever be sent, it could potentially brick the customer's device for good.

Bitmain is today's most popular seller of Bitcoin mining hardware, and its products account for 70% of the entire Bitcoin mining market. If someone hijack's the domain where this backdoor reports, he could be in the position to shut down Bitcoin mining operations all over the world, which are nothing more than the computations that verify Bitcoin transactions, effectively shutting down the entire Bitcoin ecosystem. Fortunately, there's a way to mitigate the backdoor's actions using local hosts files.

Submission + - An Infinite Number of Mathematicians Enter A Bar

ergo98 writes: The basis of floating-point numbers remains a mystery to most programmers, with many misunderstanding the benefits and correlating detriments. A new interactive explanation makes the mysterious obvious, revealing the secrets of the magic trick for all. Hopefully this improves the general knowledge about this powerful and common foundation of our work.

Submission + - Intel Puma6 modems highly vulnerable to DOS attack (dslreports.com)

Idisagree writes: It's being reported by users from the dslreports forum that the Puma6 Intel cable modem variants are highly susceptible to a very low bandwidth DOS attack.

To add to this there are class actions lawsuits already going forward for performance issues with the Puma6. (https://www.classactionlawyers.com/puma6/)

It would appear the atom chip was never going to live up to the task it was designed for and these issues may have been known within Intel for quite some time.

Submission + - LinkedIn Testing 1970's-Style No-CS-Degree-Required Software Apprenticeships

theodp writes: The Mercury News reports on REACH, a new software apprenticeship program that LinkedIn’s engineering team started piloting this month, which offers people without Computer Science degrees an opportunity to get a foot in the door, as Microsoft-owned LinkedIn searches for ways to help diversify its workforce. For now, the 29 REACH participants are paid, but are only short-term LinkedIn employees (for the duration of the 6-month program). LinkedIn indicated it hopes to learn if tech internships could eventually be made part of the regular hiring process, perhaps unaware that no-CS-degree-required hiring for entry-level permanent positions in software development was standard practice in the 70's and 80's, back when women made up almost 40% of those working as programmers and in software-related fields, nearly double the percentage of women in LinkedIn's global 2016 tech workforce. Hey, even in tech hiring, everything old is new again!

Submission + - Hacking Group Is "Charging" German Companies €250 for "DDoS Tests" (bleepingcomputer.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A group calling itself XMR Squad has spent all last week launching DDoS attacks against German businesses and then contacting the same companies to inform them they had to pay €250 ($275) for "testing their DDoS protection systems." Attacks were reported against DHL, Hermes, AldiTalk, Freenet, Snipes.com, the State Bureau of Investigation Lower Saxony, and the website of the state of North Rhine-Westphalia. The attack against DHL Germany was particularly effective as it shut down the company's business customer portal and all APIs, prompting eBay Germany to issue an alert regarding possible issues with packages sent via DHL.

While the group advertised on Twitter that their location was in Russia, a German reporter who spoke with the group via telephone said "the caller had a slight accent, but spoke perfect German." Following the attention they got in Germany after the attacks, the group had its website and Twitter account taken down. Many mocked the group for failing to extract any payments from their targets.

DDoS extortionists have been particularly active in Germany, among any other countries. Previously, groups named Stealth Ravens and Kadyrovtsy have also extorted German companies, using the same tactics perfected by groups like DD4BC and Armada Collective.

Submission + - Details on what Juno drivers are getting out of the Gett acquisition

BradyDale writes: It's been widely reported that Gett has acquired fellow rideshare upstart Juno. Juno promised it would dominate the industry by being super nice to drivers. Less than a year later, its founders are taking $200M and running. This story is the first to offer some details on how much money drivers are getting out of the restricted share units that they earned by driving.

Submission + - Will the high-tech cities of the future be utterly lonely?

adeelarshad82 writes: The prospect of cities becoming sentient is fast becoming the new reality. Take Tel Aviv for example, where everyone over the age of 13 can receive personalized data, such as traffic information, and can access free municipal Wi-Fi in 80 public zones. But in a future where robots sound and objects look increasingly sentient, we might be less inclined to seek out behaviors to abate our loneliness. Indeed, one recent study finds that exposure to or interaction with anthropomorphic products — which have characteristics of being alive — partially satisfy our social needs, which means the human-like robots of tomorrow could kill our dwindling urge to be around other humans.

Submission + - FCC Announces Plan To Reverse Title II Net Neutrality (theverge.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The Federal Communications Commission is cracking open the net neutrality debate again with a proposal to undo the 2015 rules that implemented net neutrality with Title II classification. FCC chairman Ajit Pai called the rules “heavy handed” and said their implementation was “all about politics.” He argued that they hurt investment and said that small internet providers don’t have “the means or the margins” to withstand the regulatory onslaught. “Earlier today I shared with my fellow commissioners a proposal to reverse the mistake of Title II and return to the light touch framework that served us so well during the Clinton administration, Bush administration, and first six years of the Obama administration,” Pai said today. His proposal will do three things: first, it’ll reclassify internet providers as Title I information services; second, it’ll prevent the FCC from adapting any net neutrality rules to practices that internet providers haven’t thought up yet; and third, it’ll open questions about what to do with several key net neutrality rules — like no blocking or throttling of apps and websites — that were implemented in 2015.

Submission + - Facebook Locking Users Out While Using Marketplace (twitter.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Facebook has been locking people out of their accounts when they are doing things in the marketplace. I saw 81 new tweets in the last hour about the issue.
https://www.thesun.co.uk/tech/...
A FACEBOOK glitch has allegedly left people locked people out of their accounts after they posted items for sale on Marketplace, the social network’s Gumtree-style classifieds page.

Users affected by the bug are locked out of Facebook for 72 hours, but some people claimed their accounts were closed down for weeks at a time.

https://twitter.com/search?f=t...

Submission + - Norwegian slow TV with raindeer migratin live for an entire week.

gaijin_ writes: The Norwegian broadcasting company (NRK) has a new slow TV program running. They are following a group of Sàmi raindeer herders moving with their herd the 230km migration from winter to summer pastrures. All of this is sendt live 24 hours a day from one of the most remote places in Europe. The Guardian has an article in english. The show is running on broadcast TV in Norway and is available for streaming all over the world.

Submission + - Popular belief that saturated fat clogs up arteries is a myth, experts say (independent.ie)

schwit1 writes: The authors, led by Dr Aseem Malhotra, from Lister Hospital, Stevenage, wrote: “Despite popular belief among doctors and the public, the conceptual model of dietary saturated fat clogging a pipe is just plain wrong.”

Dr Malhotra and colleagues Professor Rita Redberg, from the University of California at San Francisco, and Pascal Meier from University Hospital Geneva in Switzerland and University College London, cited a “landmark” review of evidence that appeared to exonerate saturated fat.
They said relative levels of “good” cholesterol, or high density lipoprotein (HDL), were a better predictor of heart disease risk than levels of low density lipoprotein (LDL), also known as “bad” cholesterol.

High consumption of foods rich in saturated fat such as butter, cakes and fatty meat has been shown to increase blood levels of LDL.
The experts wrote: “It is time to shift the public health message in the prevention and treatment of coronary artery disease away from measuring serum lipids (blood fats) and reducing dietary saturated fat.

“Coronary artery disease is a chronic inflammatory disease and it can be reduced effectively by walking 22 minutes a day and eating real food.”

Submission + - Pirate Site Blockades Violate Free Speech, Mexico's Supreme Court Rules (torrentfreak.com)

happyfeet2000 writes: Broad pirate sites blockades are disproportional, Mexico's Supreme Court of Justice has ruled. The Government can't order ISPs to block websites that link to copyright-infringing material because that would also restrict access to legitimate content and violate the public's freedom of expression. The ruling is a win for local ISP Alestra, which successfully protested the Government's blocking efforts.

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