Submission + - Imprisoned Hacktivist Champions WhiteHouse.gov Petition to Fire Sessions (whitehouse.gov)

Danngggg writes: Thought the Slashdot community, which is already familiar with the case of imprisoned hacktivist Martin “MartyG” Gottesfeld from Slashdot’s previous coverage here, here and here might be interested to see the WhiteHouse.gov petition the embattled activist has been recently championing in multiple articles. The petition calls on the Trump administration to fire Attorney General Jefferson Beauregard Sessions for “all the obvious reasons.” The petition is available here: https://petitions.whitehouse.g...

Submission + - Gimme da cash ... er.... owl (theatlantic.com)

ColdWetDog writes: You won't see this in modern Sweden.

In 2016, there were only two bank heists in all of Sweden, compared with 110 eight years earlier. Why the steep plunge? The country’s bent on going cashless.

Which might be why Swedish thieves are embarking on ever more outlandish crimes, including a recent series of heists worthy of The Fast and the Furious. Imagine breaking into the back of a moving delivery truck by night and stealing tens of thousands of dollars’ worth of Apple products.

Read the TFA about how enterprising crooks have tried to keep up with inflation despite the limited availability of Kroner. Seems like a lot of work for a bunch of iPads or the like. They should graduate into white collar crime.

Submission + - Blockchain is crappy technology and a bad vision for the future (thenextweb.com)

jader3rd writes: Kai Stinchcombe from The Next Web writes about how blockchain is a solution for a world without trust, and how no one wants to live in a world without trust. The article finishes with:

Projects based on the elimination of trust have failed to capture customers’ interest because trust is actually so damn valuable. A lawless and mistrustful world where self-interest is the only principle and paranoia is the only source of safety is a not a paradise but a crypto-medieval hellhole. As a society, and as technologists and entrepreneurs, in particular, we’re going to have to get good at cooperating — at building trust, and, at being trustworthy. Instead of directing resources to the elimination of trust, we should direct our resources to the creation of trust—whether we use a long series of sequentially hashed files as our storage medium or not.


Submission + - Malware Found In The Ubuntu Snap Store (linuxuprising.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Oh, snap! Just because some packages are available to install directly from the Ubuntu Software Center doesn't make them safe. This is proved by a recent in some snap packages from the Ubuntu Snaps Store.

At least two of the snap packages, 2048buntu and hextris, uploaded to the Ubuntu Snaps Store by user Nicolas Tomb, contained malware. All packages by Nicolas have since been removed from the Ubuntu Snaps Store, "pending further investigations".

Submission + - Are Technologists Unfairly Treated By Society?

ytene writes: A little over a year ago, slashdot carried the story of a man who was fined by the State of Oregon for writing "I am an Engineer" in a letter to authorities to raise a concern about a set of traffic lights. Oregon took a dislike to this because apparently he wasn't licensed to practice as an Engineer in that state. Oregon sued the man in question, although the later recanted and ultimately agreed that they had infringed the man's First Amendment rights.

Yesterday, Rudy Giuliani, former New York mayor, turned up in court in Florida to represent a woman accused of insurance fraud. In the case of Mr Giuliani — and as discussed by the article — he was not licensed by the State's bar to practice law in the state.

Although these are somewhat different areas of speciality (engineering and law) both are professions requiring a great deal of training. It's probably also important to note that in the first example I give, the engineer in question, Mats Järlström, was pointing out a problem with state-run traffic lights — in other words he was implicitly criticizing the institution that went on to sue him.

But are these two examples indicative of a broader trend in society? Are technologists and engineers seen as somehow "less worthy", if not second-class citizens.

What are your experiences?

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