Submission + - Trump Administration Approves 10 New Drone Projects Around the Country (theverge.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Just over six months after President Trump announced the creation of a program meant to spur the development of drone trials around the country, the Department of Transportation has announced the first 10 winners. Among those selected, three state transportation agencies, two US cities, and two universities will work with private companies like FedEx and CNN on trials that will see drones used for tasks like package delivery, journalism, healthcare, and more.

Formally known as the Unmanned Aircraft Systems Integration Pilot, the program encourages U.S. cities and states to partner with companies on drone trials that expand how the aircraft are used around the country. This includes, in some cases, allowing drones to fly over crowds, beyond the pilot’s line of sight, and at night — situations that are usually prohibited unless the person flying obtains an official waiver from the FAA. The goal with the program is to accelerate potential commercial applications for drone use. One of the 10 selections is Florida’s Lee County Mosquito Control District. The small government agency will use drones to help control mosquito populations by searching for hard-to-find pockets of larvae at a faster rate than inspectors can on foot, while also reducing the risk of being bitten. The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma will work on flying drones beyond a pilot’s line of sight as part of a partnership with CNN.

Submission + - Senate Democrats Force a Vote To Restore Net Neutrality (theverge.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Sen. Ed Markey (D-MA) and 32 other Democrats have submitted a new discharge petition under the Congressional Review Act, setting the stage for a full congressional vote to restore net neutrality. Because of the unique CRA process, the petition has the power to force a Senate vote on the resolution, which leaders say is expected next week. The Congressional Review Act allows Congress to roll back regulations within 60 legislative days of introduction, a process that today’s resolution would apply to the internet rules introduced by FCC chairman Ajit Pai in December. Pai’s rules reversed the 2015 Open Internet Order, which had explicitly banned blocking, throttling, and paid prioritization by internet providers. To successfully undo the Pai order and restore the 2015 rules, today’s resolution would need a bare majority in both the Senate and the House, as well as the president’s signature.

Submission + - Chrome Is Breaking Many Web-Based Games (arstechnica.com)

An anonymous reader writes: An update Google rolled out for its popular Chrome browser this weekend helps prevent those annoying auto-playing video ads on many websites from disturbing your day with unwanted sound as well. But that update is causing consternation for many Web-based game developers who are finding that the change completely breaks the audio in their online work. The technical details behind the problem involve the way Chrome handles WebAudio objects, which are now automatically paused when a webpage starts up, stymying auto-playing ads. To get around this, Web-based games now have to actively restart that pre-loaded audio object when the player makes an action to start the game, even if that audio wasn't autoplaying beforehand. "The standard doesn't require you to do this, so no one would have thought to do this before today," developer Andi McClure told Ars Technica.

Submission + - Calls From Google's "Duplex" System Should Include Initial Warning Announcements (vortex.com)

Lauren Weinstein writes: With no exceptions so far, the sense of these reactions has confirmed what I suspected — that people are just fine with talking to automated systems so long as they are aware of the fact that they are not talking to another person. They react viscerally and negatively to the concept of machine-based systems that have the effect (whether intended or not) of fooling them into believing that a human is at the other end of the line. To use the vernacular: “Don’t try to con me, bro!”

Luckily, there’s a relatively simple way to fix this problem at this early stage — well before it becomes a big issue impacting many lives.

Submission + - One of the Milky Way's fastest stars is an invader from another galaxy (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: On 25 April, the European Space Agency released a data set gathered by the Gaia satellite containing the motions, and much more, of 1.3 billion stars. Astronomers have immediately sifted the data for fast-moving stars. They are prized as forensic tools: When rewound, their trajectories point back to the violent events that launched them. Last week, one team reported the discovery of three white dwarfs—the dying embers of sunlike stars—hurtling through the galaxy at thousands of kilometers per second, perhaps flung out from supernovae explosions. Another group reported more than two dozen fast-moving stars, some apparently kicked out by our galaxy’s central black hole. And a third has confirmed that a star blazing through the outskirts of the Milky Way actually hails from another galaxy altogether, the Large Magellanic Cloud. The flood of discoveries has sent astronomers racing to their telescopes to check and classify the swift objects, says Harvard University astronomer James Guillochon.

Submission + - An AI oncologist to help cancer patients worldwide (utexas.edu)

aarondubrow writes: Before performing radiation therapy, oncologists review medical images to identify tumors and surrounding tissue, a task known as contouring. Researchers from MD Anderson Cancer Center developed a new method for automating the contouring of high-risk clinical target volumes using artificial intelligence and supercomputers. They found that the predicted contours could be implemented clinically with only minor or no changes. The results were presented in the June 2018 issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics. The method will be particularly useful in countries where expertise in contouring is rare.

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