Submission + - Supreme Court Set To Hear Landmark Online Sales Tax Case (gizmodo.com)

An anonymous reader writes: On Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments in a case that could at least somewhat clarify Donald Trump’s complaints about Amazon “not paying internet taxes.” It will also decide if those cheap deals on NewEgg are going to be less of a steal. The case concerns the state of South Dakota versus online retailers Wayfront, NewEgg, and Overstock.com in a battle over whether or not state sales tax should apply to all online transactions in the U.S., regardless of where the customer or retailer is located. It promises to have an impact on the internet’s competition with brick-and-mortar retailers, as well as continue to address the ongoing legal questions surrounding real-world borders in the borderless world of online.

Submission + - 19-year-old archivist charged for downloading freedom-of-information releases

Ichijo writes: According to an article on CBC News, a Canadian teen "has been charged with 'unauthorized use of a computer,' which carries a possible 10-year prison sentence, for downloading approximately 7,000 freedom-of-information releases. The provincial government says about 250 of those contain Nova Scotians' sensitive personal information."

"When he was around eight...his Grade 3 class adopted an animal at a shelter, receiving an electronic adoption certificate. That lead to a discovery on the classroom computer. 'The website had a number at the end, and I was able to change the last digit of the number to a different number and was able to see a certificate for someone else's animal that they adopted,' he said. 'I thought that was interesting.' The teenager's current troubles arose because he used the same trick on Nova Scotia's freedom-of-information portal, downloading about 7,000 freedom-of-information requests."

Submission + - Remeber Lycos? They still exist, and are discontinuing their Free Email service (lycos.com)

williamyf writes: You may think of it as the end of an era, or as the final nail in the coffin.

Today Lycos, one of the Pioneering web portals of the '90s notified all it's users that:

  "On May 15th, 2018, we will no longer be offering free Lycos Mail accounts."

they have been very upfront about the reason:

"Q: Why are you doing this?

A: Providing mailboxes costs us money, and we no longer make enough from ads to support the cost of the mailboxes."

At it's heyday, Lycos was acquired by Terra Networks (a division of Telefonica), then sold to Daum Communications in Korea and then to Ybrant Digital in India.

The search engine and other parts (like angelfire, Tripod and Gamesville) continue working.

In the meantime, instructions are provided to Download all your mail via POP3 for offline archival, or to upgrade to Paid Accounts.

Submission + - New child protection nonprofit strikes back at sex-negative approach of SESTA (youcaring.com)

qirtaiba writes: When the SESTA online sex trafficking bill passed last month, it sailed through Congress because there were no child protection organizations that stood against it, and because no Member of Congress (with the brave exceptions of Ron Wyden and Rand Paul) wanted to face re-election having opposed a bill against sex trafficking, despite its manifest flaws.

In the wake of the law's passage, its real targets—not child sex traffickers, but adult sex workers and the Internet platforms used by them—have borne the brunt of its effects. Website like the Erotic Review and Craigslist's personals section have either shut down entirely or for U.S. users, while Backpage.com has been seized, leaving many adult sex workers in physical and financial peril.

A new child protection organization, Prostasia Foundation, has just been announced, with the aim of taking a more sex-positive approach, that would allow it to push back against laws that really target porn or sex work, under the guise of being child protection laws. Instead, the organization promotes a research-based approach to the prevention of child sexual abuse before it happens. From the organization's press release:

Prostasia Director Jaylen MacLaren is a former child prostitute who used a website like this to screen her clients. She now recognizes those clients as abusers, but she does not blame the website for her suffering. “I am committed to preventing child sexual abuse, but I don’t believe that this should come at the cost of civil liberties and sexual freedom,” Jaylen said. “I have found ways to express my sexuality in consensual and cathartic ways.” ...

Nerea Vega Lucio, a member of the group’s Advisory Council, said “Child protection laws need to be informed by accurate and impartial research, and ensuring that policy makers have access to such research will be a top priority for Prostasia.”


Submission + - ReactOS 0.4.8 released with Windows Vista/7/8/10 API support (osnews.com) 1

jeditobe writes: With software specifically leaving NT5 behind, ReactOS is expanding its target to support NT6+ (Vista, Windows 8, Windows 10) software. Colin, Giannis and Mark are creating the needed logic in NTDLL and LDR for this purpose. Giannis has finished the side-by-side support and the implicit activation context, Colin has changed Kernel32 to accept software made for NT6+, and Mark keeps working on the shim compatibility layer. Although in a really greenish and experimental state, the new additions in 0.4.8 should start helping several software pieces created for Vista and upwards to start working in ReactOS. Microsoft coined the term backwards compatibility, ReactOS the forward compatibility one.
A new tool, a DrWatson32 alike, has been created by Mark and added to 0.4.8, so now any application crashing will create a log file on the desktop. This crash dump details the list of modules and threads loaded, stack traces, hexdumps, and register state.

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