Submission + - Campaign Orchestrated by Tech-Backed Code.org Calls Dibs on Fed $ for K-12 CS

theodp writes: Like Mission Impossible messages, tech-bankrolled Code.org's VoterVoice.net campaign to influence the U.S. Department of Education has self-destructed. But evidence of the campaign, which essentially called for stuffing the comments box at the Dept. of Education to give K-12 Computer Science education first dibs on $200 million earmarked for STEM education by President Trump's Executive Order, can still be found in Google search results, as well as in the 1,448 comments on the Secretary’s Proposed Supplemental Priorities and Definitions for Discretionary Grant Programs at regulations.gov. In fact, the phrase "Computer science is now foundational knowledge every student needs" — which had only 5 hits on Google — pops more than 900 times in the 1,447 comments submitted to the Dept. of Education, echoing documents filed by the Code.org Advocacy Coalition (members; "Computer science is now foundational knowledge every student needs..."), as well as Code.org Diamond Supporters ($10+ million) Microsoft ("In particular, Microsoft supports strongly Priority 6 – Promoting Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) Education, With a Particular Focus on Computer Science, which we believe would rightfully establish an unprecedented focus on computer science education across the Department of Education’s discretionary grant programs."), and Amazon ("we are concerned that funding in this section could be directed to existing mathematics and science programs at the expense of developing computer science curricula"). A document submitted by the American Library Association (ALA) asked for recognition — and money — to be directed to the ALA's efforts to offer coding programs for students, which include its Libraries Ready to Code initiative, sponsored by Code.org Platinum Supporter ($3+ million) Google. In a recently released Code.org video, Microsoft President and Code.org Board Member Brad Smith boasts, "When people look back at what is genuinely an important national movement — the movement of computer science into America's mainstream education — they will appreciate that Co[de].org was not only in the center it was absolutely at the forefront of all of this." No doubt. In 2016, Smith called for federal funding of K-12 CS, and worked with the White House to sell the press on the need for President Obama's since-abandoned $4B CS for All initiative before it was announced to the public.

Submission + - Dark Web Shops Are Leaking IPs Left and Right (bleepingcomputer.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The takedown of three major Dark Web markets (AlphaBay, Hansa Market, and RAMP) by law enforcement officials over the summer has driven many vendors of illegal products to set up their own shops that, in many cases, are not properly configured and are leaking the underlying server's IP address. People with no technical skills that previously relied on point-and-click account setup tools are now installing their own servers and websites and the results are the ones you expect.

In the past two months, a Japanese security researcher has been hunting Dark Web shops that leak IP details and reporting them to authorities. For example, the researcher tracked down a cannabis shop to a Dutch IP, a multi-drug store to an Ukrainian IP, a hacking forum to a Moldovan IP, and a performance enhancing drug store to another Ukrainian IP.

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