Submission + - Magic Mushrooms 'Reboot' Brain In Depressed People, Study Suggests (theguardian.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Magic mushrooms may effectively “reset” the activity of key brain circuits known to play a role in depression, the latest study to highlight the therapeutic benefits of psychedelics suggests. Psychedelics have shown promising results in the treatment of depression and addictions in a number of clinical trials over the last decade. Imperial College London researchers used psilocybin – the psychoactive compound that occurs naturally in magic mushrooms – to treat a small number of patients with depression, monitoring their brain function, before and after. Images of patients’ brains revealed changes in brain activity that were associated with marked and lasting reductions in depressive symptoms and participants in the trial reported benefits lasting up to five weeks after treatment. Dr Robin Carhart-Harris, head of psychedelic research at Imperial, who led the study, said: “We have shown for the first time clear changes in brain activity in depressed people treated with psilocybin after failing to respond to conventional treatments.

“Several of our patients described feeling ‘reset’ after the treatment and often used computer analogies. For example, one said he felt like his brain had been ‘defragged’ like a computer hard drive, and another said he felt ‘rebooted.' Psilocybin may be giving these individuals the temporary ‘kick start’ they need to break out of their depressive states and these imaging results do tentatively support a ‘reset’ analogy. Similar brain effects to these have been seen with electroconvulsive therapy.” The study has been published in Scientific Reports.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: What to put for work samples when CTO has butchered all my work?

An anonymous reader writes: Hi Slashdot, I feel like many of you have had this problem: I am looking for a job with a new company and most ask for links to "recent work" but the reason I am leaving my current job is because this company does not produce good code, and after years of trying to force them to change they have refused to change any of their poor practices, because the CTO is a narcissist and doesn't recognize that so much is wrong.

I have written good code for this company, the problem is it is mostly back-end code where I was afforded some freedom, but the front-end is still a complete mess that doesn't reflect any coherent coding practice whatsoever. I have tried so hard for five years to change the company's practices but I spend more time arguing in vain with the CTO than actually improving the company's development problems. I am giving up on fixing this company but finding it hard to exemplify my work when it is hidden behind some of the worst front-end code I have ever seen. Most applications ask for links to live code, not for code samples (which I would more easily be able to supply). Some of the websites look OK on the surface but are one right click -> inspect element away from giving away the mess; most of the projects require a username and password to login as well but account registration is not open.

So how do I reference my recent work when all of my recent work is embarrassing on the front-end? What have you done in this situation?

Submission + - Steve Wozniak Announces Tech Education Platform 'Woz U' (techcrunch.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Steve Wozniak, the Apple co-founder who changed the world alongside Steve Jobs, has today announced the launch of Woz U. According to the release, Woz U will start as an online learning platform focused on both students and companies that will eventually hire those students. Woz U is based out of Arizona, and hopes to launch physical locations for learning in more than 30 cities across the globe. At launch, the curriculum will center around computer support specialists and software developers, with courses on data science, mobile applications and cybersecurity coming in the future. Alongside the education platform, Woz U will also offer platforms for tech companies to recruit, train and retain their workforce through on-site customized programs and subscription-based curricula. There also will be a platform for K-12 students, which will be distributed to school districts, that will offer STEAM programs to identify talent and nudge those individuals into a tech-based career. And if that weren’t enough, Woz U will eventually introduce an accelerator program “to identify and develop elite tech talent.”

Submission + - Dutch Privacy Regulator Says Windows 10 Breaks the Law (arstechnica.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The lack of clear information about what Microsoft does with the data that Windows 10 collects prevents consumers from giving their informed consent, says the Dutch Data Protection Authority (DPA). As such, the regulator says that the operating system is breaking the law. To comply with the law, the DPA says that Microsoft needs to get valid user consent: this means the company must be clearer about what data is collected and how that data is processed. The regulator also complains that the Windows 10 Creators Update doesn't always respect previously chosen settings about data collection. In the Creators Update, Microsoft introduced new, clearer wording about the data collection—though this language still wasn't explicit about what was collected and why—and it forced everyone to re-assert their privacy choices through a new settings page. In some situations, though, that page defaulted to the standard Windows options rather than defaulting to the settings previously chosen. In the Creators Update, Microsoft also explicitly enumerated all the data collected in Windows 10's "Basic" telemetry setting. However, the company has not done so for the "Full" option, and the Full option remains the default.

The DPA's complaint doesn't call for Microsoft to offer a complete opt out of the telemetry and data collection, instead focusing on ensuring that Windows 10 users know what the operating system and Microsoft are doing with their data. The regulator says that Microsoft wants to "end all violations," but if the software company fails to do so, it faces sanctions.

Submission + - Source code reviews: does Symantec have something to hide? (itwire.com)

troublemaker_23 writes: When Symantec chief executive Greg Clark decided this week to explain his company's 2016 change of policy over allowing governments to review the source code of its software, was he not aware that his comments could be interpreted as Symantec having something to hide?

Submission + - Google Bombs Are Our New Normal (wired.com)

mirandakatz writes: Tech companies’ worst crises used to come in the form of pranks like Google bombs: Users figured out how to game search results, such as when a search for “miserable failure” turned up links to information about then-president George W. Bush. Today, in the era of fake news and Russian interference, that’s basically our new normal—but as Karen Wickre, a former communications lead at companies like Google and Twitter, points out, tech companies’ approaches to dealing with the new breed of crises haven’t evolved much since the age of Google bombs. Wickre suggests a new, collaborative approach that she dubs the “Federation,” writing that “No single company, no matter how massive and wealthy, can hire its way out of a steady gusher of bad information or false and manipulative ads...The era of the edge case—the exception, the outlier—is over. Welcome to our time, where trouble is forever brewing.”

Submission + - Recordings of the sounds heard in the Cuban US Embassy attacks released (apnews.com)

chrissfoot writes: The Associated Press has obtained a recording of what some U.S. Embassy workers heard in Havana in a series of unnerving incidents later deemed to be deliberate attacks. The recording, released Thursday by the AP, is the first disseminated publicly of the many taken in Cuba of mysterious sounds that led investigators initially to suspect a sonic weapon.

Slashdot Top Deals