Submission + - Google Hosts Nonprofit That Says Research Shows Boys a STEM Buzzkill for Girls

theodp writes: After abruptly canceling a 4 p.m. town hall meeting on Thursday that was intended to address fallout from the James Damore memo, Google and CEO Sundar Pichai hosted a 6 p.m. girls-only coding event at the Googleplex. "I want you to know there's a place for you in this industry," Pichai told young women at the Technovation World Pitch Summit, which honored all-girl teams of coders from all over the world "There's a place for you at Google. Don't let anyone tell you otherwise. You belong here and we need you." Interestingly, the Technovation FAQ explains why boys don't belong in the Google-sponsored Technovation challenges: "[Q.] Can boys participate in the program? [A.] Anyone can use Technovation's free online curriculum, but participation in Technovation's official competition is limited to girls. Women are highly underrepresented in the technology fields. Research shows that women are more enthusiastic and engaged in STEM courses when they are in an all-girls environment because they feel comfortable participating and asking questions. We aim to provide that safe environment and provide the girls with role models so they can see themselves in technology careers. Other technology and entrepreneurship initiatives are co-educational such as FIRST, SMASH, and BUILD, but Technovation is just for young women." So, is separating boys and girls in the name of STEM learning a good or bad thing?

Submission + - SHA2-256 Linearized (undocumented.info)

User8201 writes: All, this is my article and an associated implementation to demonstrate correctness of the concepts is available here:
https://sourceforge.net/projec...

Article URL: http://www.undocumented.info/h...

Long story short, a new way to represent cryptosystems like SHA2-256 was obtained which requires only a table of numbers, i.e. a fully linear matrix of coefficients. There is a precise way to use the matrix in question, and the result is that nonlinear systems can be modeled exactly in a linear way, if you no longer require the user to compute all outputs at once, but allow a more iterative use for the matrix.

Hopefully some fellow math nerds will be out there and will be excited.

Cheers!

Submission + - Is adblocking a DMCA violation? (torrentfreak.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: Easylist, the popular AdBlock filter list has been the target of a DMCA takedown notice. Two days ago, a commit appeared in the Easylist repo on Github, removing the domain "functionalclam.com" from Easylist, following a DMCA takedown notice filed with Github.

That domain appears to be owned by US-based anti-adblocking company Admiral who claims that publishers have lost $13.4 Billion so far this year, due to AdBlock.

According to a comment on the EasyList repo, functionalclam.com is not actually an ad server but is part of Admiral's "copyright access control platform" that they provide to publishers. Admiral claims that blocking functionalclam.com amounts to "circumventing a publisher’s copyright access control technology" in violation of the DMCA.

Submission + - YouTube AI deletes war crime videos as 'extremist material'

AmiMoJo writes: YouTube is facing criticism after a new artificial intelligence program monitoring "extremist" content began flagging and removing masses of videos and blocking channels that document war crimes in the Middle East. Middle East Eye, the monitoring organisation Airwars and the open-source investigations site Bellingcat are among a number of sites that have had videos removed for breaching YouTube's Community Guidelines. The removals began days after Google, which owns YouTube, trumpeted the arrival of an artificial intelligence program that it said could spot and flag "extremist" videos without human involvement. But since then vast tracts of footage, including evidence used in the Chelsea Manning court case and videos documenting the destruction of ancient artifacts by Islamic State, have been flagged as "extremist" and deleted from its archives.

Submission + - No Donald Trump — We Will Not "Come Together" with the Alt-Right Racists (vortex.com) 6

Lauren Weinstein writes: Part of his original insipid, blame everybody on “many sides” attempts at creating false equivalence between these genuine and wannabe Nazis — vis-a-vis the protesters against them — was the all too familiar call for us to “come together as one.” But what does that really mean?

We can apply Spock-like logic to this one.

Submission + - The space station gets a new supercomputer

Esther Schindler writes: By NASA's rules, not just any computer can go into space. Their components must be radiation hardened, especially the CPUs. Otherwise, they tend to fail due to the effects of ionizing radiation. The customized processors undergo years of design work and then more years of testing before they are certified for spaceflight. As a result, the ISS runs the station using two sets of three Command and Control Multiplexer DeMultiplexer (C&C MDM) computers whose processors are 20MHz Intel 80386SX CPUs, right out of 1988.

The traditional way to radiation-harden a spacecraft computer is to add redundancy to its circuits or by using insulating substrates instead of the usual semiconductor wafers on chips. That’s expensive and time consuming. HPE scientists believe that simply slowing down a system in adverse conditions can avoid glitches and keep the computer running.

So, assuming the August 15 SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launch goes well, there will be a supercomputer headed into space — using off-the-shelf hardware. Let's see if the idea pans out. "We may discover a set of parameters with which a supercomputer can successfully run for at least a year without errors," says Dr. Mark R. Fernandez, the mission’s co-principal investigator for software and SGI's HPC technology officer. "Alternately, one or more components of the system will fail, in which case we will then do the typical failure analysis on Earth. That will let us learn what to change to make the systems more reliable in the future."

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Who Is Behind The "This One Weird Trick" Scam Ads On The Internet?

dryriver writes: Everybody who uses the Intertubes has seen these ads a thousand times — its always "one weird trick", "one simple trick" or similar that promises everything from curing diabetes, tinnitus and herpes at home, to reducing your belly fat, overcoming erectile dysfunction, stopping your hair loss or overcoming insomnia and jet lag. There is even a "super secret video" circulating online that "may be taken down any minute" claiming that a brilliant Jewish Doctor found a very simple cure for cancer in Nazi Germany, and that the cure was then "covered up" after WWII ended. What is the miracle cancer cure in question? According to the video, taking Hydrogen Peroxide orally in increasing doses gets rid of all types of cancer within a few weeks, and they are selling a printed guide that tells you exactly how much HP you should take. Question: Who puts this deceptive crap online in the first place, why do thousands of websites agree to carry these ads, and why isn't there some kind of government or regulatory authority that orders these ads taken down, because they don't deliver what they promise?

Submission + - We are the first, the only and thus the last (sciencedaily.com)

wisebabo writes: In this Science Daily article: https://www.sciencedaily.com/r... "Where is everybody? The Implications of Cosmic Silence", the retired astrophysicist Daniel Whitmire explains that using the principle of mediocracy (a statistical notion that says, in the absence of more data, that your one data point is likely to be "average"), that not only are we the first intelligent life on earth but that we will likely be the ONLY (and thus the last) intelligent life on this planet. (Please look at the article for details of his argument)

Unfortunately that isn't the worst of it

What this means, is that coupled with the "Great Silence", it implies that the reason we haven't heard from anyone is that intelligent life, when it happens anywhere else in the universe, doesn't last and when it does it flames out quickly and takes the biosphere with it (preventing any other intelligent life from reappearing. Sorry dolphins!). While this is depressing in a very deep sense both cosmically (no Star Trek/Wars/Valerian universes filled with alien civilizations) and locally (we're going to wipe ourselves out, and soon) it is perhaps understandable given our current progress towards reproducing the conditions of the greatest extinction event in earth's history: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/0...

So not only are we the first, only and last intelligent organisms on earth but intelligent life when it occurs in the universe will be short lived, will happen just once, and will thus will be utterly isolated (separated from any possible equals by the gulfs of cosmic space and time).

Just thought you'd enjoy some cheery thoughts for a relaxing Sunday

Submission + - Publishers have lost $13.4 Billion this year because of AdBlock 3

rudy_wayne writes: Easylist, the popular AdBlock filter list has been the target of a DMCA takedown notice.. Two days ago, a commit appeared in the Easylist repo on Github, removing the domain "functionalclam.com" from Easylist, following a DMCA takedown notice filed with Github.

That domain appears to be owned by US-based anti-adblocking company Admiral who claims that publishers have lost $13.4 Billion so far this year, due to AdBlock.

According to a comment on the EasyList repo, functionalclam.com is not an ad server but is part of Admiral's copyright access control platform that they provide to publishers. Admiral claims that blocking functionalclam.com amounts to "circumventing a publisher’s copyright access control technology" in violation of the DMCA.

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