Submission + - If DHS database gets hacked it's hard to get a new face (technologyreview.com)

schwit1 writes: We’re willing to do a lot to make the airplane boarding process smoother, but privacy experts say we might want to think twice before agreeing to let a camera at the gate scan our faces.

Facial-recognition systems may indeed speed up the boarding process, as the airlines rolling them out promise. But the real reason they are cropping up in U.S. airports is that the government wants to keep better track of who is leaving the country, by scanning travelers’ faces and verifying those scans against photos it already has on file. The idea is that this will catch fake passports and make sure people aren’t overstaying their visas.

The practice is raising concerns among some legal experts, who say that the program may violate individual privacy protections and that Congress has not fully authorized it.

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has partnered with airlines including JetBlue and Delta to introduce such recognition systems at New York’s JFK International Airport, Washington’s Dulles International, and airports in Atlanta, Boston, and Houston, among others. It plans to add more this summer. The effort is in response to a years-old mandate from Congress that DHS implement a biometric system for recording the entry and exit of non–U.S. citizens at all air, sea, and land ports of entry. Earlier this year, President Trump fast-tracked that mandate via executive order.

Submission + - Amazon Prime does more for northern food security than federal subsidies (www.cbc.ca)

schwit1 writes: The consensus in Iqaluit seems to be that everyone with a credit card has an Amazon Prime membership. That’s because people can often find groceries cheaper online than in local stores, despite government food subsidy programs.

“Amazon Prime has done more toward elevating the standard of living of my family than any territorial or federal program. Full stop. Period,” a local principal, who declined to speak further, said on Facebook.

Submission + - Galaxy Magazine now available at Archive.org

Paul Fernhout writes: Archive.org has made available 355 issues of Galaxy Magazine for free access. Galaxy Science Fiction was an American digest-size science fiction magazine, published from 1950 to 1980 with stories from many sci-fi greats. At its peak, Galaxy greatly influenced the science fiction field. See also Open Culture and The Verge for more about the history of a magazine that help shape the imaginations of a generation of techies..

Submission + - Elon Musk told a group that we need to regulate AI before it's too late (recode.net)

turkeydance writes: Elon Musk doesn’t scare easily — he wants to send people to Mars and believes that all cars will be driving themselves in the next ten years. He’s excited about it!

But there is something that really scares Musk: Artificial Intelligence, and the idea of software and machines taking over their human creators.

He’s been warning people about AI for years, and today called it the “biggest risk we face as a civilization” when he spoke at the National Governors Association Summer Meeting in Rhode Island.

Musk then called on the government to proactively regulate artificial intelligence before things advance too far.

“Until people see robots going down the street killing people, they don’t know how to react because it seems so ethereal,” he said. “AI is a rare case where I think we need to be proactive in regulation instead of reactive. Because I think by the time we are reactive in AI regulation, it’s too late.”

Submission + - Quit Your Job for a Better One? Not if You Live in Idaho (nytimes.com) 4

cdreimer writes: According to The New York Times: Idaho achieved a notable distinction last year: It became one of the hardest places in America for someone to quit a job for a better one. The state did this by making it easier for companies to enforce noncompete agreements, which prevent employees from leaving their company for a competitor. While its economy is known for agriculture — potatoes are among the state’s biggest exports — Idaho has a long history as a technology hub. And the new law landed in the middle of the tech world, causing a clash between hungry start-ups looking to poach employees and more established companies that want to lock their people in place. “We’re trying to build the tech ecosystem in Boise,” said George Mulhern, chief executive of Cradlepoint, a company here that makes routers and other networking equipment. “And anything that would make somebody not want to move here or start a company here is going to slow down our progress.”

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Are you MAD AS HELL and not going to take it anymore??

TheRealHocusLocus writes: This year marks the 40th anniversary of Howard Beal's rant in the 1976 movie 'Network', and I am staring at a laptop in the throes of a Windows 10 Update 'gasm'. Progress has rolled past 100% several times and started over. They decided people don't mind that. Some cutesy-pie message "close to goodness" flashes by that was probably 'tiger-team tested' by overpaid professionals. I am on call, supposed to be monitoring a sewer plant. Instead after several dismissals to the screens without a LATER, NOT NOW or I'LL LET YOU KNOW, I pushed the reschedule dialogue to the rear and left it waiting. But my application did not count as activity and I left for a few moments, so Windows decided to answer its own question and restart (breaking a persistent Internet connection). In addition to the flaky Bluetooth and countless options missing or rearranged beyond belief to accommodate stupidphones, I've had it.

Upon due consideration I now conclude I have been personally f*ck'd with. Driver availability, my apps and WINE permitting, this machine is getting Linux or pre-Windows-8.

We're not supposed to act this way, get angry. I'm sure there are no angry people North of Oregon, or it could never have come to this. And replacing signed components with other signed components could not possibly take this long, there must be eons of just-in-time crapulation going on behind that blue screen. I'm done with it. That's mine, now let's hear about the things that are pushing you over the edge this very minute. Phones, software, power windows, anything. Are you MAD AS HELL? Let's get a Real Beal rant rolling.

Submission + - Coding: The New Vocationalism

theodp writes: "Goodbye to old vocational education preparing youth for jobs in an industrial economy," begins Stanford Professor Emeritus of Education Larry Cuban in Coding: The New Vocationalism. "Hello to the new vocational education of teaching coding and computer science to all U.S. students. Public schools have experienced two spasms of vocationally-driven reform. One created the 'old vocational education' in the early 20th century endorsed by the National Association of Manufacturers and now the 'new vocational education' a century later, endorsed by high-tech CEOs spreading the gospel for teaching children to learn to code and take computer science courses. Then and now, policymakers saw an intimate connection between a strong economy and strong schools." He adds, "The strong smell of Silicon Valley self-interest accompanies these proposals to improve schooling. Behind Code.org and other advocacy groups are the thick wallets of donors and technology companies carrying iconic names. In pushing state and local education officials to require computer science for high school graduation, classify the subject as a fourth 'science' in the secondary curriculum, substitute for a foreign language requirement, and have five year-olds learn to code wafts the scent of companies seeking graduates who can enter the computer and information workforce, a minute fraction of the entire U.S. workforce."

Submission + - White House doxxes "election integrity" commission critics (vox.com)

Huge_UID writes: The White House made emails from concerned citizens public without censoring any of the personal information included in those emails. The emails regarded the “election integrity” commission and it’s plan to release voters’ sensitive personal information.

Vox https://www.vox.com/policy-and...
RT https://www.rt.com/usa/396395-...

Although I’m a big fan of "Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity”, I’m going with malice on this one.

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