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Comment: Re:That popping sound (Score 1) 270

by zztong (#44991735) Attached to: Central New York Nuclear Plants Struggle To Avoid Financial Meltdown

Deaths per kWh is very interesting and informative, though I would point out the person you replied to seems to have had a larger scope of cleanup costs in mind. I wonder how the facts stack up on that. I tried to google some of those, but didn't have much luck finding something that summarized it. There are plenty of sources discussing the costs of individual clean ups.

Comment: Re:Nissan Leaf (Score 1) 466

by zztong (#44877125) Attached to: Can GM Challenge Tesla With a Long-Range Electric Car?

The problem I have with the Leaf is that my 25 mile commute would be way too much for it in the winter where I often get stuck in 2 hour traffic jams at temps from 32 to 0F, if my employer had a charge station it might be enough to risk it but draining 70+% of the battery just for locomotion during ideal temp days doesn't leave enough safety margin for cold weather performance plus heater usage.

Is telecommuting an option on weather days?

Comment: Re:Nissan Leaf (Score 1) 466

by zztong (#44877047) Attached to: Can GM Challenge Tesla With a Long-Range Electric Car?

I only drive about 5 miles a day, so an electric vehicle would work for me. The trouble I face is even a Nissan Leaf is too much car. Using the Nissan Leaf web site to compute my savings, for the $21,000 vehicle I would save $138 a year in gas over the fuel performance of a used Honda Accord that cost me $8000. A new Nissan Leaf compared to my Kawasaki Ninja is even worse. The Leaf saves me just $24 a year, though admittedly the Leaf would be useful in snow in rain when the motorcycle isn't.

I'm all for having an electric car, but overcoming the sticker price is the tough part. I need the electric car to be around $10,000 and last about 15 years, otherwise it makes more financial sense to drive fuel efficient used cars.

Comment: Contractor? (Score 1) 301

by zztong (#44689841) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How To Get Open Source Projects To Take Our Money?

Could you hire one of the developers on the open source project as a contractor to implement a feature? It could be a modest feature at a generous hourly rate. It could be a feature the developer already had planned and perhaps could consider the feature to have been sponsored by your company, generating good will and a positive public image, in addition to enjoying a needed feature.

Comment: How about... (Score 1) 293

by zztong (#31228698) Attached to: After Learning Java Syntax, What Next?

A favorite book of mine is "Refactoring - Improving the design of existing code" by Martin Fowler. It's probably best read after you've written code for a little while.

You might find "Head First - Servlets and JSP" kind of fun if you're interested in programming web applications. I'd save JSP for later and focus on servlets if you're just starting out.

Comment: Re:But unfortunately... (Score 1) 189

by zztong (#30833338) Attached to: Looking Back At <em>Dungeons &amp; Dragons</em>

Not to quibble, but clerics devoting themselves to a concepts/philosophy was possible in any version of D&D. It may not have been specifically mentioned in the rule book, but it was quite common. Some folks even let any/all of the "divine" casters claim they were really just tapping into a different form of "arcane" energy that for all intents and purposes acted like "divine" spells. It's really just a matter of separating the "special effects" of the game from the "mechanics."

Scientists will study your brain to learn more about your distant cousin, Man.

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