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Submission + - Forward Osmosis could be a life saver for cholera victims

cramco writes: A time-lapse video has appeared showing the Forward Osmosis technology behind a new IV that could save hundreds of thousands of lives in countries suffering from cholera:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qe3OP0-x36A&feature=youtu.be

Reduced shipping costs for IV bags could save more lives than we can imagine. Case in point: Traditional one-liter IV bags used to combat cholera weigh about 2.3 lbs, or just under 38 oz. A new IV bag called Mali weighs about 2 oz. The difference? No water in the Mali bag, saving more than $500 on a shipment of 14 units to an African country. Once there, the Mali bag can be mixed with any kind of water, even urine, to create a sterile solution. Without water, it can also be shipped and transported more economically and benefit from a longer shelf life. This could save 100,000+ lives annually.

The technology behind the bag is called Forward Osmosis (FO). Here's how it works: If you put a membrane between water and any type of salt, the salt will create a draw that will move water through the membrane. This process requires no power, as opposed to Reverse Osmosis (RO), which uses power to push water containing salt and other solids to produce clean water.

The FO process leaves the water with salt in its content. The salt in this case could be sodium chloride, sugar, potassium chloride, magnesium and others. This lends itself beautifully to IV solutions since most of these solutions require salt of some type to be injected into veins.

The manufacturer is trying to get some funding under a Philips Innovation Fellowship run on Indiegogo. Here's more about the Indiegogo campaign and how the IV bag works:
http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/save-120-000-lives-from-cholera-deaths-around-the-world

Submission + - TSA is officially allowed to lie to you in order to cover itself

zoan2013 writes: Blogger Johnathan Corbett reports that the remaining claims of his lawsuit against the TSA were dismissed on Tuesday with US District Judge Joan A Lenard basically saying the TSA doesn't have to tell the truth in TSA-related FOIA requests. (Full dismissal order here) Judge Lenard also refused to allow the 19 previously dismissed charges to be appealed while the rest were being decided. Corbett is now appealing to the Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit, and is considering filing a complaint of judicial misconduct against Lenard.

Submission + - Should Google stop reading Gmail?

cpaglee writes: The Wall Street Journal recently ran a story revealing that Google took the federal government to court over National Security Letters. But Google lawyers will go to court today to argue that Google has the right to continue scanning Gmail. This comes after Google's legal counsel says Google users should have no legitimate expectation of privacy when they use Gmail.

Gmail is a fantastic product and it has been incredibly successful with over 425 million active users. Gmail registration allows Google to track all the websites I visit through Google.com and the news articles I read if those websites partner with Google. Google uses this data to build highly valuable user profiles to focus advertisements. Does Google really need to read my emails too?

Google pulled out of China because of censorship required by the Chinese government while they were allowing NSA to plug a pipe into Google central and spy on the whole world? Like any typical teenager, Google seems to be stuck deciding whether it wants to be good or evil.

Should Google muzzle their lawyers, focus on brand equity and customer good will and just agree to stop reading customer emails?

Machines certainly can solve problems, store information, correlate, and play games -- but not with pleasure. -- Leo Rosten

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