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Comment: Re:Amazon attempts to use their monopoly power (Score 1) 437

by zerobytes (#31001702) Attached to: Amazon Surrenders To Macmillan On eBook Pricing
I guess I don't understand why this argument can't be decided in the free market. Let Macmillan charge a higher price - I just won't buy the books until they come down in price. That's what I do with physical books, why not ebooks? I own a kindle and read plenty of e-books. If I think the story is worth the price then I pay for it. I appreciate that there are companies out there editing books, cleaning them up, and pushing them to the public. I'll buy that. I've read enough e-crap literature to know that digging through hack sites to find the gem among the dross is not worth my time.

Having said that, I rarely purchased (or purchase) any book in hardback and try to keep my book buying below $10 a pop. Yes, every now and then there will be a book I HAVE to have before it drops below that price but I don't mind the additional cost.

I, personally, get frustrated by all the people who insist that they deserve more money in their job and every possible life amenity while whining that other people should make less (bloated, overpaid execs excluded, of course). Let the free market decide and pay for what you patron. Otherwise, be willing to give up your paycheck in the name of "free information".

Comment: Re:Divergence? (Score 2, Interesting) 190

by zerobytes (#30752636) Attached to: Game Endings Going Out of Style?
I'd have to agree with you here. For me, gaming is all about the story and I have yet to find a story that I loved SO much that I didn't want it to end at some point. Harry should finally face off with Voldemort, Luke should finally face his father and save the galaxy, and Mario should finally find the princess. Preferrably, all this should happen before I turn it off because I feel it's wasting my life.

It seems so many games nowadays will carrot you as long as they can until you leave the franchise in disgust or boredom rather than satisfaction. Kill it till it's dead then reboot or revive it till it's dead again. Wash, rinse, repeat. This zombie-like creativity in our producers AND consumers is unfortunate. There is nothing wrong with ending a good thing while it's still a good thing and then moving on to something better. Sadly, it is, of course, all about the amount of money that can be sucked out of our emotional attachment to a character or a world or a cause. Hence, teenagers and college kids are revolutionizing our industries because they haven't figured that out that it's all about the money yet. As they see it (and we should as well), there are still great undiscovered stories, worlds, and characters out there. We're just too scared or too lazy to explore them.

Comment: root cause (Score 1) 404

by zerobytes (#29617757) Attached to: Americans Don't Want Targeted Ads
I think the root issue here is not the advertising. It's that people don't want other people tracking their online activity. Sure, no one likes ads but people have to make money. If there must be ads then I'd rather they be tailored to me - BUT, I don't want someone snooping through my internet history. That's private (or as /.ers know, not so private - so why do we fuss so much?).

Comment: Re:Mod: +6 (Score 1) 1146

by zerobytes (#28959423) Attached to: Navigating a Geek Marriage?

I would add one important piece of advice though: Remember That You Will Both Screw Up. In any close relationship, you will inevitably end up hurting one another from time to time; sometimes in everyday little ways, sometimes in almighty one-off fuck-ups. Patience and forgiveness from both parties are the only medicine for such ills, and when applied liberally and sincerely, the relationship will often be stronger after the fuck-up than before.

I'll agree to this completely. Just make sure the almighty one-offs are one-offs. Even being honest and continually apologizing can't compensate for continually screwing up in the same way. It's important to recognize that successful marriages require hard work and sacrifice (like pausing - or better yet, turning off when the kids are screaming).

Also, like writing code, you don't really get to see the big picture and benefits (apart from the sex) until a lot has been written. You'll get small opportunities to look back at what's there and be satisfied but it takes years of ups and downs (see parent) to establish the deeper, stronger benefits of your partnership

Final comment, the statement in here about marriage is a relationship, not a method is mostly true. If you're sincerely trying to improve things by using methods that you discuss with your wife then you're working together (see previous team post). This is a good thing to set ground rules and habits. But yeah...honesty, teamwork, and forgiveness go a long way...even for geeks.

Comment: Startup Idea (Score 1) 586

by zerobytes (#28930805) Attached to: Nissan Unveils All-Electric LEAF
A rescue charge car. People are going to be breaking down all over the place in these things. "But my iPhone said I could go 23 miles on what I had left and home is only 20 miles according to my Garmin..." Someone's going to make millions on a 15 minute 'quickie' charge to get people home or wherever they're going. Of course you could always create a swappable battery system too.

Comment: Re:Filed: October 9, 2008 (Score 1) 202

by zerobytes (#28882945) Attached to: Company Awarded "The Patent For Podcasting"
Michael Scott: "Wikipedia is the best thing ever. Anyone in the world can write anything they want about any subject, so you know you are getting the best possible information." Regardless of the history, Podcasting was definitely not created by Apple. If it was then they would have it locked down tight like everything else they own.

Mr. Cole's Axiom: The sum of the intelligence on the planet is a constant; the population is growing.

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