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Comment: Re:Which is why corporations are born criminals (Score 1) 247

by zazzel (#46428257) Attached to: BP Finds Way To Bypass US Crude Export Ban

You must be pretty naive to think that the "possible abuse hasn't materialized in Finland". First of all, this idea is also present in the German tax code ( 42 AO). It is a constant reason of judicial trouble, and it puts the state above the law - because it only works against the taxpayer and not in other circumstances. It is a clear indication of a cleptocratic government. Second, there are hidden costs: In your example, a couple marrying and then divorcing again is clearly f*cked. Their marriage is lost, and so is their money. And, of course, their belief in justice. Which is the greatest cost of all.

But I know, people with collectivist tendencies see the "state" or "society" as standing above individual justice.

Comment: Re:So what happens (Score 1) 253

by zazzel (#46407039) Attached to: Comcast Turning Chicago Homes Into Xfinity Hotspots

I *suspect* that even Comcast will route this through a secondary public IP and will also log activity there. At least that's what Deutsche Telekom does. Hotspot users get an IP address different from your own public IP address. I think doing otherwise would also endanger your NATed private network, if ever so slightly.

Comment: FON & Deutsche Telekom (Score 3, Informative) 253

by zazzel (#46406189) Attached to: Comcast Turning Chicago Homes Into Xfinity Hotspots

Same principle here in Germany.

But Deutsche Telekom is not doing this as an opt-out thing, but as opt-in - plus you need a certain router model. I bought the (inexpensive) router and opted in, because now I can use all of these home router hotspots, plus all FON hotspots worldwide, all Telekom hotspots (in public places, at McDonald's, in high speed trains). The public hotspot users get very low QoS, so they don't harm my VDSL connection.

And the best thing: All I have to do to keep using it is connect the home router at least once every 30 days. So since the router is not my primary choice, 99% of time I'm freeloading and using my custom router, all the while keeping my hotspot privileges.

Comment: Re:Privacy? (Score 2) 124

by zazzel (#46230295) Attached to: How I Lost My Google Glass (and Regained Some Faith In Humanity)

If she sees me and she (or the thief) shares it online, it *is* an invasion of my privacy. And that's why I am opposed to Google Glass. If I sit in a restaurant, that is a private venue, not a public place. So turn off your f*cking Google Glass, or I will. There is a fundamental difference between seeing me somewhere, and saving imagery of seeing me somewhere.

You might find that if you used GG here in Germany, you might find yourself confronted with a lawsuit.

Comment: Re:"post-food consumers" (Score 1, Troll) 543

by zazzel (#46044171) Attached to: 20,000 Customers Have Pre-Ordered Over $2,000,000 of Soylent

Then I don't have to replace ANY meal with it. If "soylent" is just a combination of nutrients and Joules (or calories, for the backward food crowd), then why would I waste my time with it? My average diet of varied, tasty meals is more than enough to keep me happy and healthy. I enjoy eating and cooking!

Maybe Wal-Mart will happily sell it (In their non-food section?). Whole Foods probably won't.

It is still inconceivable to me how anyone would forgo the pleasures of good food, given the fact that we don't have much time on earth to enjoy it anyway.

Comment: Re:And (Score 1) 437

by zazzel (#46033785) Attached to: You Might Rent Features & Options On Cars In the Future

This way, automakers can cut themselves down to only making a small handful of identical engines, and cut their design costs dramatically.

We already mostly have that. At least Volkswagen and BMW do it for engines I know, like the VW TDI series, where just software and piston rods made the difference. And, of course: brakes! The brakes vary depending on the engine. So there's a limit to that, because other costly stuff depends on the engine power.

On a side note: In my 2003 VW Golf, it was cheaper to buy it WITHOUT cruise control and get an upgrade from a dealership, than ordering it directly with cruise control (at least in Germany, guess they never tried to sell cars without CC in the U.S.

Comment: Re: lol @ Romanian "btc billionaire" (Score 1, Redundant) 209

by zazzel (#46011807) Attached to: Romanian Bitcoin Entrepreneur Steps In To Pay OpenBSD Shortfall

Romanian--like French, Spanish, and Italian--is a romance language descended directly from Latin. Some even argue that it's the Romance language that today most closely resembles Latin!

I'd say it's the language that most closely resembles Italian. You can really confuse them, at least with your eyes closed. Of course, if you open your eyes again, you will easily spot the Italian: It's the one constantly using his/her hands to make gestures. Italian is probably the only language that doesn't leave out deaf people. You can essentially *see* everything that's being said. And of course, even if your hearing is somewhat impaired, you can also still hear it. At the other end of town.

Comment: It's a contract, guys... (Score 2) 378

by zazzel (#44882755) Attached to: Obama Asks FCC To Make Carriers Unlock All Mobile Devices

I wonder what the fuss is about. When you're agreeing on a cell phone + contract, the contract has a subsidy in it. So, Obama is actually forcing a seperation of both parts. I still think companies should be able to lock the phone for the initial 2-year duration of the contract. If you don't want that, buy your phone somewhere else and get a bare contract, like I've been doing for years, or PAYG.

I usually buy my phones whenever I want a new one, where it's cheapest. Then I go and find a contract where the guy selling it hands me part of his commission, or I use PAYG. I'm usually better off than with a contract+phone.

Comment: Re:USENET? (Score 1) 534

by zazzel (#44861465) Attached to: Toronto Family Bans All Technology In Their Home Made After 1986

You might be closer than you think to the ways cults are started.

Some borderline Luddite over bearing parent imposes a rule that if something was good enough for their parents its good enough for their children, and another oddball sect is born.

So if everyone around you started chewing khat*, you'd say: "My children can do it, too, so they will function in the world around them. We're not some cult who abstains from what everyone else is doing!"

I doubt your children will miss anything if they're not constantly exposed to TV series, smartphone apps or the internet in general. The educational value of ruining your attention span is also quite dubious to me.

*: Or smoking cigarettes, if that sounds less far-fetched to you. I assume neither of us lives in Yemen.

Comment: Re:How many knew that it was a global release? (Score 1) 443

by zazzel (#44552351) Attached to: Despite Global Release, Breaking Bad Heavily Pirated

True infact.

On German satellite HD channels, timeshift is usually disabled for many channels. And there's still ads, and you have to pay 60€/yr for the HD channels.
IPTV (Telekom Entertain) DOES support timeshifting on all channels, but it's impossible to get the recorded movies out of the set-top-box (Microsoft Mediaroom). So I'm stuck watching on my TV. That is, as long as my subscription for IPTV was active. The second I changed my DSL provider, all the movies on my STB's HD were ...gone. Imagine my fury when some long-kept documentaries were lost.

  It's simply MUCH easier to download complete seasons of "Game of Thrones" and just put them on a NAS, or do whatever I like with them.

I remember when GoT started on TNT HD: I missed the first few episodes, and the only way to catch up was... pirating.

Comment: Re:What is happening to you guys? (Score 1) 867

by zazzel (#44378625) Attached to: Door-To-Door Mail Delivery To End Under New Plan

Well, healthcare is a problematic issue in all the countries - because of its nature. I cannot even start to explain the system in Germany, its rules, shortcomings and benefits. Let's just say: healthcare is *always* expensive. I think our system is comparatively okay. The British NHS is a disaster with low-quality healthcare for the masses, the US system *so far* seems to provide good results, but at high cost, and with social problems I would rather not see in my country. I was quite surprised to see fellow students without healthcare in the US when I studied there. At that time, in Germany, most students were just part of their parents' contract, or paid the student premium of maybe 60 USD/mo.

Comment: Re:Already happening (Score 1) 867

by zazzel (#44378383) Attached to: Door-To-Door Mail Delivery To End Under New Plan

You are part of the reason home delivery is so expensive. If you don't want to drive miles to a mailbox cluster, the USPS doesn't want to drive those miles to deliver a bulk mail envelope that only earned them 25 cents.

So you are saying that we could all be better off (more comfortable, less junk mai) if the USPS just increased prices? Paying 2x the current amount isn't going to stop anyone from sending you important mail, but it COULD stop bulk mail. I often have to dump 95% of my mail right at the door, and I bet I have already lost *some* important mail that was hidden between some junk mail I tossed.

Take your work seriously but never take yourself seriously; and do not take what happens either to yourself or your work seriously. -- Booth Tarkington

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