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Comment: Re:Missing option (Score 1) 219

by zauberberg51 (#48150849) Attached to: When will the first successful manned Mars mission happen?
The "Wonder of Exploration" has always been limited to a small percentage of the population. Most people are sheep. That may be cynical but it rings true. There will always be "wingnuts" who hop on a boat to the New World and most of their neighbors will wish them God Speed and Good Ridance. And expect them to not survive the experience.

Comment: Reports ++ Mainframe tapes (Score 1) 179

by zauberberg51 (#47995037) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Is Reporting Still Relevant?
I helped install an MRP system at a defense contractor back in the 1980's. The Director wanted his "Tapes". Which were 2 boxes of greenbar paper with the allocation report from midnight on it. And it was obsolete 60 minutes after the morning shift started. Consider training the people who need reports on how useful dashboards are for identifying trouble spots.

Comment: Re:Ya, but... (Score 2) 392

by zauberberg51 (#47919615) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Any Place For Liberal Arts Degrees In Tech?
My daughter has a liberal arts degree with very little math. She would not be a good hire for an IT company. On the other hand, she is managing a group of sales reps selling consulting. She can easily handle the numbers game in this business and has very good critical thinking skills that make her very valuable in her current role and in her previous positions. I suspect that a liberal arts degree with enough STEM/programming experience is what companies really need, not another STEM who can't write.

Comment: Re:Automate them (Score 1) 228

Yeah, my last boss wanted a spreadsheet every couple of months on all of the development databases ( I was in the DBA group for a SQL Server shop), what size were they, what version of the two parts of the application were installed. It would take half a day to run through all 60+ development databases. After I did it the first time, I started writing scripts to gather the data from the data dictionary for each database and storing in a few of tables in each database. I had another script that ran every week that collected the data from each database and wrote it to a schema on my local database and to a schema on one of the newer systems. He stopped asking for the spreadsheet after the second request because I pointed him to the repository where he could export the data into a spreadsheet or query the data to ask questions about the weekly history of changes. All of the jobs ran under my network id, so when they laid me off, all of the jobs had to fail. I still wonder if they remembered to changed the ownership of those jobs or if they are continuing to fail because my id is inactive.

Comment: Re:I believe it because.. (Score 1) 291

by zauberberg51 (#47107751) Attached to: Parenting Rewires the Male Brain
I would agreed completely after my first child. I would add some caveats after my second child. He was much more difficult to deal with. But my wife and I learned how to cope. For example, #1 was a great traveler. #2 had ear issues and couldn't fly in an airplane without screaming until he was 7. #1 was always easily entertained if we were out for a meal. We learned after the 4th or 5th attempt that #2 needed to move around after 15 minutes. All it took was a short walk around the restaurant and he was good for another 15 minutes. I learned how to read the signs that he was getting restless. When he was 12, our lunch was very slow, so I had him go outside and run around the parking lot twice. Our friends thought we were crazy. but it worked. So it is not so much being a better person as learning what your child can handle at different stages of their development and how to make the necessary adjustments without ceding any more control and authority than is required. My son still remembers that lunch as one of his favorites.
XBox (Games)

Modded Xbox Bans Prompt EFF Warning About Terms of Service 254

Posted by Soulskill
from the by-reading-this-you-bequeath-me-all-your-possessions dept.
Last month we discussed news that Microsoft had banned hundreds of thousands of Xbox users for using modified consoles. The Electronic Frontier Foundation has now pointed to this round of bans as a prime example of the power given to providers of online services through 'Terms of Service' and other usage agreements. "No matter how much we rely on them to get on with our everyday lives, access to online services — like email, social networking sites, and (wait for it) online gaming — can never be guaranteed. ... he who writes the TOS makes the rules, and when it comes to enforcing them, the service provider often behaves as though it is also the judge, jury and executioner. ... While the mass ban provides a useful illustration of their danger, these terms can be found in nearly all TOS agreements for all kinds of services. There have been virtually no legal challenges to these kinds of arbitrary termination clauses, but we imagine this will be a growth area for lawyers."

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