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Comment: Re: Do users really care? (Score 1) 197

by khellendros1984 (#48687029) Attached to: Snowden Documents Show How Well NSA Codebreakers Can Pry
Judging from the responses to your posts, your opinion isn't as popular as you might have expected. It's certainly a more extreme position than I'd take.

I don't consider sacrificing privacy for convenience to such a degree and enabling Facebook's behavior by using it to be a very principles move.

To which degree? Providing a fake name, birthdate, and other information, blocking image tags, and posting untagged text information? I suppose that they can extract a fair amount of info about me from information that my friends post, but if I didn't have an account, Facebook has algorithms that would infer most of those connections anyhow.

Facebook is a tool that encourages incorrect use. Kind of like a bank, or a credit card. Still, I enjoy the conveniences of direct-deposited paychecks, not carrying around the amounts of cash that would encourage the police to seize it, and paying for things that are difficult to get by cash. Facebook has less utility than a credit card, of course. Therefore, they have less information about me. Although they've done things that I consider annoying, I haven't actually been harmed in a way that I can measure. Part of that is because I haven't given them sufficient leverage to do so.

Comment: Re: Do users really care? (Score 4, Insightful) 197

by khellendros1984 (#48686637) Attached to: Snowden Documents Show How Well NSA Codebreakers Can Pry

That's just a fact.

You keep using that word. I don't think it means what you think it means. That's an opinion.

Facebook is intolerable to anyone with actual principles.

"Actual" principles being the principles that you hold, and no one else's principles being "actual", No True Scotsman style.

Social networking is an option for socialization. Almost no one uses it to the exclusion of more traditional social activities, although I agree that Internet socialization is a mere shadow of in-person socialization.

You've either got an oversimplified black-and-white view of the world, or you're just getting a kick out of trolling everyone. Either way, I hope it works out for you. The way I'm living my life is working out wonderfully for me, in spite of our differences of opinion.

You can continue being all "stop liking what I don't like!" I'm gonna get back to talking to my friends and spending time with my wife.

Comment: Re:Lesson goes unlearned (Score 1) 66

by khellendros1984 (#48686215) Attached to: Sony PlayStation Network Back Up Now, Supposedly
Depends on the plan. I've got unlimited texts and data, don't pay to send or receive calls from mobile devices, and have 10x more minutes for landline calls than I've ever used in a given month. I don't know about payment models for pay-as-you-go plans, because I've never used one, and almost no one that I know has ever had a plan like that.

Comment: Re:Lesson goes unlearned (Score 1) 66

by khellendros1984 (#48686081) Attached to: Sony PlayStation Network Back Up Now, Supposedly

If Americans are stupid enough to pay to receive SMSes, that's just them being silly

Most plans include unlimited SMS services, but some cheaper ones charge per-message sent or received. There's no reason to insult a nationality over something as stupid as having different phone plans. There are plenty of worthier things to insult America and Americans over, after all.

Comment: Re:This should be free (Score 2) 170

I know that for most GSM calls, there are a few stream ciphers in common use, and most or all of them can be cracked in realtime. That just covers the connection between your phone and a cell tower, anyhow. It's meant to protect you from eavesdropping, and not much more.

Comment: Re:Hmmmm ... legality? (Score 1) 138

by khellendros1984 (#48603225) Attached to: Amazon UK Glitch Sells Thousands of Products For a Penny
Doesn't it already work the other way? A seller is offering a product at a stated price. A buyer states that they will pay that price for the product. The sales contract is in effect when the seller ships the product (implicitly accepting the deal), and charges the buyer. If the buyer realizes before the product ships that they'd like to back out of the transaction, they can do so.

At least, that's the theory. In practice, a seller may not be completely honest about whether the product has already shipped or not. And in theory, a seller would check that their price was as it was intended, but in practice, they might not for every transaction.

Comment: Re:Read one, write other (Score 1) 567

by khellendros1984 (#48574999) Attached to: The Case For Flipping Your Monitor From Landscape to Portrait
Browsing the web often involves a fair amount of typing on the web, which isn't comfortable on a tablet. And that I'll often be chatting with one or more friends at the same time, possibly watching a video in another window, etc. If I've got a PC available, it's always going to be my machine of choice, over a tablet. Now, if I'm reading the news before bed or something, a tablet's just fine. But not for much more than the most casual of uses.

Comment: Re:Can it run Flash? (Score 1) 140

by khellendros1984 (#48568999) Attached to: $35 Quad-core Hacker SBC Offers Raspberry Pi-like Size and I/O
I found some information that implies that the Android version will be 4.4, and I think you can sideload Flash on Android devices, even though it's not supported by Adobe any more. (In fact, I just tried it, and it'll run on my Android 5.0 phone just fine)

For desktop Linux, I don't think that Adobe has ever released an ARM port of the plugin, so you'd be out-of-luck if you wanted to run a "real" OS, rather than a mobile one. Well, unless Gnash has gotten good enough to be usable for your purposes. It's been a number of years since I tried it, and it didn't impress me then.

Comment: Re:One good turn... (Score 4, Interesting) 235

by khellendros1984 (#48568711) Attached to: James Watson's Nobel Prize Medal Will Be Returned To Him
Racism is a belief. Facts can't hold beliefs, although they can be used to support someone's belief. Unreasonable conclusions and unreasonable interpretations of facts can be racist. Facts cannot, and logic cannot.

Say that a bullet-proof study came out saying that blond-haired people are, on average, far less intelligent than brown-haired people (assuming some specific, concrete definition of and way of measuring "intelligence" were to be discovered). In and of itself, that would be a fact. If you add the opinion that "more intelligent is better than less intelligent", then you might come up with the prejudiced opinion that "brown-haired people are better than blond-haired people". That doesn't make the fact itself "colorist". It's only the combination of fact and preconceived opinion that makes the thought colorist.

Comment: Re:Also, (Score 1) 140

by khellendros1984 (#48566965) Attached to: $35 Quad-core Hacker SBC Offers Raspberry Pi-like Size and I/O

Hoping this new little ARM board is ARM v7

TFS states that it's a Cortex-A5. That family of chips implements the ARMv7 instruction set. Cortex-A5 looks like it's a little less powerful per-MHz than a Cortex-A8, but the higher clock and core count should mean that it's much more powerful than the Beagleboard XM. I don't get the focus on Ubuntu, though. There's no real benefit to running that instead of Debian.

Comment: Re:No, it's not crazy (Score 1) 205

by khellendros1984 (#48560451) Attached to: The Failed Economics of Our Software Commons
Well, they could provide a marketing benefit via word-of-mouth, of course. But what software do you know that's really bug-free? And anyhow, you can't say that a user like that isn't *more* of a freeloader than someone who at least gives some kind of positive feedback to the developer (well, you can, but I'd disagree with you).

Comment: Re:No, it's not crazy (Score 1) 205

by khellendros1984 (#48552235) Attached to: The Failed Economics of Our Software Commons
The "freeriders" in the summary don't include those that "test it, and give feedback, find bugs, suggest improvements". If someone's doing that, then they're a helpful part of the development process. The text in the summary that describes freeriders/freeloaders is:

A huge number of people and businesses ostensibly benefit from these projects, and the vast majority are freeriders that contribute nothing to their development.

Obviously, that can't be talking about people that submit bug reports and suggestions.

User Journal

Journal: DB Cooper lives? 1

Journal by tqft

Sorry for the clickbait. Just a write up from a book coming out soon.

I think I just like how the story won't die.

http://dailyreview.crikey.com.au/rundle-the-43-year-old-legend-of-d-b-cooper/16590?utm_source=The+Rundown&utm_campaign=503d1bd720-The_Rundown_Tuesday_2_December2_12_2014&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_33b9e8bf4f-503d1bd720-81103281

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