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Submission + - Apple Censors Dalai Lama iPhone Apps in China (

eldavojohn writes: Google and Yahoo! have relinquished any sort of ethical integrity with regards to free speech in China but Apple appears to be following suit by blocking Dalai Lama applications in the Chinese iPhone app store. An official Apple statement reads, 'We continue to comply with local laws. Not all apps are available in every country.' A small monetary price to pay for the economic boon that is the blooming Chinese cell phone market but a very large price to pay for that in principals.

Submission + - openbsd 4.6 released

pgilman writes: "the release of openbsd 4.6 was announced today. highlights of the new release include a new privilege-separated smtpd, numerous improvements to packet filtering, software RAID, routing daemons, and the tcp stack, a new installer, and lots more too. grab a cd set or download from a mirror, and please support the project (which also brings you openssh and lots of other great free software) if you can."

Submission + - 70% Of Banks Say Their Employees Committed Fraud (

yahoi writes: The financial crisis appears to be exacerbating fraud by bank employees: a new survey found that 70 percent of financial institutions say that in the last 12 months they have experienced a case of data theft by one of their workers. Meanwhile, most banks don't want to talk about the insider threat problem and remain in denial, says a former Wachovia Bank executive who handled insider fraud incidents at the bank and has co-authored a new book called Insidious — How Trusted Employees Steal Millions and Why It's So Hard for Banks to Stop Them that investigates several real-world insider fraud cases at banks.

Submission + - The Value of Digital Downloads Hit Zero?

Hodejo1 writes: Despite the fact that iTunes can still hawk a tune for $0.99 the prevailing wisdom is that overall the value of a digital track is approaching zero dollars. Almost every artist gives away a track or two these days, hoping the music itself will help them rise above the white noise of obscurity as described by the likes of Michael Geist and Cory Doctorow. But a whole body of work? This week Mojo Nixon, who retired from the biz in 2004, announced his comeback. On Wednesday, October 7th the self-proclaimed psychobilly artist will release in it's entirety his new album titled Whiskey Rebellion as a free digital download on Amazon. Not only will all of those tracks be made free, but everything in the artist's 25 year oeuvre — 150 tracks in all — will be "sold" for the princely sum of $0.00. Needless to say, Nixon figures it's better to give up the digital pennies if it will serve to draw new and old fans to his concerts. ""What do I have to lose? I'll make more money off of this in the long run." Of course, all of this music has been available for free on P2P for years, so if the digital tracks aren't selling anyway why not give them away officially and save fans a letter from the RIAA.
Data Storage

Optimizing Linux Use On a USB Flash Drive? 137

Buckbeak writes "I like to carry my Linux systems around with me, on USB flash drives. Typically, SanDisk Cruzers or Kingston HyperX. I encrypt the root partition and boot off the USB stick. Sometimes, the performance leaves something to be desired. I want to be able to do an 'apt-get upgrade' or 'yum update' while surfing but the experience is sometimes painful. What can I do to maximize the performance of Linux while running off of a slow medium? I've turned on 'noatime' in the mount options and I don't use a swap partition. Is there any way to minimize drive I/O or batch it up more? Is there any easy way to run in memory and write everything out when I shut down? I've tried both EXT2 and EXT3 and it doesn't seem to make much difference. Any other suggestions?"

Make it right before you make it faster.