Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

+ - NASA's JPL develops multi-metal 3D printing process->

Submitted by yyzmcleod
yyzmcleod (1534129) writes "The technology to 3D print a single part from multiple materials has been around for years, but only for polymer-based additive manufacturing processes. For metals, jobs are typically confined to a single powdered base metal or alloy per object. However, researchers at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory say they have developed a 3D printing technique that allows for print jobs to transition from one metal to another in a single object."
Link to Original Source

+ - Festo BionicKangaroo gets a jump on Hannover Messe->

Submitted by yyzmcleod
yyzmcleod (1534129) writes "German automation firm, Festo, announced that the company will be debuting another of its nature-inspired robots — the BionicKangaroo-- at the Hannover Messe industrial trade show in April. The 3D-printed, meter-tall robot can jump up to 80cm and is controlled via a armband remote that senses the operator's arm gestures."
Link to Original Source

+ - Canadian tech creates superior hockey stick->

Submitted by yyzmcleod
yyzmcleod (1534129) writes "While composite hockey sticks are favored for their light-weight and performance relative to wood, they tend to break under competitive play conditions. And at around $300+ a pop, the costs and annoyance can tally up quickly. At least it did for Daniel Lucchesi, whose start-up company, Toronto-based Colt Hockey, is creating a composite stick covered in nano-tech cladding that’s purported to make the sticks virtually unbreakable yet without making them heavier or inflexible. Source: Design Engineering Magazine"
Link to Original Source
Technology

+ - Festo to fly BionicOpter at Hannover->

Submitted by
yyzmcleod
yyzmcleod writes "Building on the work of last year’s bionic creation, the Smart Bird, Festo announced that it will literally launch its latest creation, the BionicOpter, at Hannover Messe in April. With a wingspan of 63 cm and weighing in at 175 grams, the robotic dragonfly mimics all forms of flight as its natural counterpart, including hover, glide and manoeuvring in all directions. This is made possible, the company says, by the BionicOpter’s ability to move each of its four wings independently, as well as control their amplitude, frequency and angle of attack. Including its actuated head and body, the robot exhibits 13 degrees of freedom, which allows it to rapidly accelerate, decelerate, turn and fly backwards."
Link to Original Source
Technology

+ - Canadian tech company shows off world's largest touchscreen->

Submitted by
yyzmcleod
yyzmcleod writes "Touchscreen maker, Baanto International of Mississauga, Ontario made a splash at the Ontario Centre’s of Excellence Discover 12 show this week by applying the company’s ShadowSense technology to what is believed to be the world’s largest multi-touch screen at 10.6 by 4-foot. According to Baanto, its ShadowSense technology has a response time of less than seven milliseconds and touch detection of up to 35 simultaneous objects down to 5 millimeters in diameter."
Link to Original Source

+ - Researchers create life-sized 3D hologram for videoconferencing->

Submitted by
yyzmcleod
yyzmcleod writes "A research team at Queen’s University has created a human-scale 3D hologram pod that allows people in different locations to videoconference as if they are standing in front of each other.

Called TeleHuman, the technology is the creation of professor Roel Vertegaal, director of the Human Media Lab, and his graduate team at the Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario.

Similar to the Star Trek holodeck, participants can walk around the 3D hologram of the remote person they’re talking to and view them from all sides. More importantly, the system captures 3D visual cues that 2D video miss, such as head orientation, gaze and overall body posture."

Link to Original Source
Data Storage

+ - Intel SSD 910 PCI Express SSD Benchmarked-> 1

Submitted by
MojoKid
MojoKid writes "With the traction PCI Express SSDs have gained in the market recently, it's about time Intel offered up a solution of their own. In this arena, though there have been a few high-end workstation-targeted solutions launched, the large majority of products in this class of SSD are targeted to the Datacenter and the Enterprise. The 800GiB Intel SSD 910 seen here is made up of four SSD modules, 200GiB for each module, though they're populated across two PCBs, each with 448GB of Intel 25nm NAND per card (over-provisioned). Each of the SSD arrays is managed by a co-developed Intel-Hitachi SAS/NAND controller. Providing a X8 Gen 2 PCI Express link to the card edge is LSI's LSISAS2008 PCI Express to SAS bridge. Performance-wise, with 2GB/sec sustained read and up to 1.5GB/sec sustained write bandwdith, the card competes well versus competitive solutions in the market and comes with a 7 to 14PB (400GiB and 800GiB cards respectively) lifetime endurance rating."
Link to Original Source
Iphone

+ - Your move, HTC->

Submitted by zacharye
zacharye (2330148) writes "There is a window, and it is open. HTC got a head start on Samsung’s Galaxy S III and its One-series smartphones have everything it takes to find success if wireless subscribers are made aware of their existence more effectively and aggressively. That window may slam shut this summer when the Galaxy S III launches, and it may have iron bars bolted over it this coming fall when Apple launches its next-generation iPhone. In the meantime, HTC has little time to spare if it hopes to seize this opportunity and become a smartphone leader once again..."
Link to Original Source
Math

+ - Deformable Liquid Mirrors for Adaptive Optics->

Submitted by eldavojohn
eldavojohn (898314) writes "Want to make a great concave mirror for your telescope? Put a drop of mercury in a bowl and spin the bowl. The mercury will spread out to a concave reflective surface smoother than anything we can make with plain old glass right now. The key problem in this situation is that the bowl will always have to point straight up. MIT's Technology Review is analyzing a team's success in combating problems with bringing liquid mirrors into the practical applications of astronomy. To fight the gravity requirement, the team used a ferromagnetic liquid coated with a metal-like film and very strong magnetic fields to distort the surface of that liquid as they needed. But this introduces new non-linear problems of control when trying to sync up several of these mirrors similar to how traditional glass telescopes use multiple hexagon shaped mirrors mounted on actuators. The team has fought past so many of these problems plaguing liquid mirrors that they produced a proof of concept liquid mirror just five centimeters across with ninety-one actuators cycling at one Kilohertz and the ability to linearize the response of the liquid. And with that, liquid mirrors take a giant leap closer to practicality."
Link to Original Source
Science

+ - 2PiR * Cycles/Sec = Gooooaaalll!!!->

Submitted by yyzmcleod
yyzmcleod (1534129) writes "As the World Cup finals kick off, the most talked about and controversial figure in the game isn’t a player but Jabulani, the new Adidas World Cup soccer ball (the name means “to celebrate” in isiZulu). Designed by researchers from Loughborough University, United Kingdom, the ball has drawn considerable criticism from players. Goalies in particular have described the ball’s in-air behaviour as “ridiculous”, “shameful” and even “supernatural”. Not only does it travel faster than previous World Cup models but players say the ball’s curve through the air or “bend” is erratic and unpredictable. Adelaide University physics professor, Derek Leinweber, explains why."
Link to Original Source

Bus error -- please leave by the rear door.

Working...