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Comment Re:Does it matter? (Score 1) 380

"My computer runs well, does everything I want but I can't put the latest bells and whistles on it. Waaaaaahh."

The fact that you say that since you have an Intel Processor you should be able to run the latest OS means you don't know what you're talking about. Apple doesn't want your late night, drunken support calls, that's all.


Open Sarcasm Fighting Copyrighted Punctuation 155

pinkushun writes "SarcMark is a copyrighted punctuation mark, that claims 'It's time that sarcasm is treated equally!' Pretty damn cheeky while they're charging for their software, which only inserts their punctuation through a hotkey. Open Sarcasm is destroying SarcMark by advocating a new punctuation mark (not displaying here properly — alt+U0161) as the new open and free sarcasm symbol. Either way, this will be one interesting turnout. With bad unicode support across the web, displaying the characters properly might be an issue. PS Left out sarcastic end sentence as Slashdot doesn't display the U0161 character."

Comment Re:Sunflowers aren't so bad (Score 1) 247

Overdue? Does my wallet have memory?

But I take your point: some people are just that dumb. But MOST people aren't, and for them, jotting down a password or password mnemonic and keeping it in their wallet is way better than making a sunflower. Combine that with a strategy that limits the number of passwords and login names, and you have a pretty robust situation.

Check out Bruce Schneier's commments on this subjct if you haven't already.

Comment Re:Sunflowers aren't so bad (Score 1) 247

I'm 52 and haven't had my wallet stolen since 1969. Not a big security risk. In any case, you can obfuscate them, or simply not complete them or any other relatively straightforward way of not writing out "Bank of America, acct # xxxxxxxx, pw=asdf". Most pickpockets will simply take the money and dump the wallet in the nearest trashcan.

And if your wallet is stolen, you'll know about it, presumably. Then you have to figure out some new passwords, not before.

Work expands to fill the time available. -- Cyril Northcote Parkinson, "The Economist", 1955