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Comment: Re:I've hired people with misdemeanors before (Score 1) 717

by yog (#48543181) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Can a Felon Work In IT?

I was implying nothing of the sort. I was just asking a yes-no question.

In fact I believe in giving people a second chance. However, there's a big difference between a felony and a misdemeanor, depending on the crime. A felony could be car theft (although it's classified as a misdemeanor in some states) or rape or assault.

A misdemeanor might mean a threat of violence that was not carried out. A felony might mean a threat of violence that was carried out. Would you want to hire someone who was convicted of violent assault?

I'm not discounting every possible person, but when you compare someone who has no record of violence with someone who has a record of violence, there's a clear distinction and an obvious preference to go with the non violent person.

Drugs frankly are a completely different category from what I consider real crimes. We should just decriminalize or legalize drugs completely, and stop wasting time and resources on it.

That said, if someone is a cocaine addict I definitely wouldn't want him or her in my organization, especially if he had access to valuable information or resources that he could sell to pay for his next week of fixes.

Comment: Start your own business. (Score 4, Insightful) 717

by yog (#48542737) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Can a Felon Work In IT?

You really have very few choices. There are employers out there who actually seek out people with priors, but for the most part you're going to be frustrated in your attempts to land a job.

Your best bet is to start your own business, for example web design or outsourced PC network maintenance. There are lots of people making a good living as free lancers.

Once you have gotten established, which admittedly may take a couple of years of networking and marketing efforts, you may not wish to be an employee again anyway. You can set your own hours, choose your own customers, and take full charge of your life. It's not easy, and requires more skills than just showing up and doing a specific task from 9 to 5, but much more fulfilling in the long run, and few will run background checks.

You're still going to have trouble getting loans; just work hard and build up equity, and the rest will follow. Best of luck.

Comment: Why California? (Score 1) 172

by yog (#47500935) Attached to: California In the Running For Tesla Gigafactory

I'm surprised California would even be in the running. Land is expensive, taxes are high, and cost of living is among the highest in the country.

By contrast, Arizona and Nevada have cheap land, low taxes, and low cost of living plus low labor costs.

California's main asset is its technology population, plus access to sea ports.

Should be interesting to see who wins. I would have thought that Mr. Musk would prefer to place his plant in a low cost region like Malaysia or south China, but I guess there are logistical and political reasons to keep it in the home country.

Comment: Re:I think this is bullshit (Score 1) 1746

by yog (#46660067) Attached to: Brendan Eich Steps Down As Mozilla CEO

Eich (and a majority of the voters in California) advocated defining marriage in the California constitution as a union between a man and woman. This would prevent same sex marriages from having the same legal standing as trad marriages, at least with regard to hospital visitation rights, next of kin status, and taxation. Neither Eich, nor the majority of people who voted yes, said anything about opposing the gay lifestyle or seeking to limit the human rights of gay people, discrimination in the work place, etc. Eich has stated that he opposes such discrimination, but obviously that wasn't sufficient for the thought police.

The fact is, if someone like Eich can be forced to resign, then anyone is vulnerable. Some dirt digger can find something on you or me, expose it to the world virally, and you or I would be out of a job and branded for life. Be careful what you wish for.

Comment: Re:I think this is bullshit (Score 1) 1746

by yog (#46659701) Attached to: Brendan Eich Steps Down As Mozilla CEO

I am a lesbian and I still think hounding Eich for standing for Prop. 8 and threatening to boycott a cornerstone of the internet and internet development if he was CEO of the Mozilla foundation is complete and utter intolerant bullshit. I am very disappointed with people doing such things and disappointed he caved to such.

I agree with Samantha. They hounded a good man out of their organization and now the entire community suffers, not just from the loss of his knowledge and experience but also the loss of moral high ground. This had nothing to do with gay rights. No one is against gay rights. This is about political correctness.

I'm not likely to donate any money or time to Mozilla in the future. Lots of luck to them; they're going to need it.

Comment: Every boy used to do this (Score 5, Interesting) 1078

by yog (#43608483) Attached to: Florida Teen Expelled and Arrested For Science Experiment

When I was in school, it was basically a full time job for many of us boys to figure out ways to make ever larger and more dramatic explosions happen. We used to fill trash bags full of methane from the lab, seal them with tape, then release them with a lit fuse and watch this huge fireball in the sky (I stopped before the principal took notice, so I didn't get caught:). I mean, kids just do stuff like that.

The difference today is the zero-tolerance rules in many public schools where even a little 6-year-old boy making a shape of a gun with his hand and going "bang!" at another kid is grounds for suspension.

As usual, bureaucracy gets it wrong. That girl should be reinstated and an apology should be issued, otherwise she'll be barred for life from many professions (albeit, as a minor theoretically her record is sealed, but in reality she's screwed).

And racism? That was just an extra little tidbit the OP added to spice things up. Ridiculous.

Comment: It's a pretty neat little gadget (Score 2) 74

by yog (#43205639) Attached to: Review: Make: Raspberry Pi Starter Kit

I got one about a month ago from Newark. I got a ($12) case too, and that came much sooner; the Pi took about two weeks to arrive.
Setting it up was pretty straightforward. I installed the Raspbian image to an 8gb Sd card (about $7 from Amazon), plugged the Pi directly into my router, and powered it up using one of my various microUSB chargers I have lying around.

Then I was able to get in easily using ssh. I updated the OS, added a few utilities, and started vncserver. From that point, I could access the graphical UI from a window on my Suse desktop. SSH is faster, however; the board isn't that fast.

I plugged in a spare bluetooth dongle that was not recognized by my Suse desktop, but the Pi recognized it properly and could see other bluetooth devices around the house. Neat!

I then plugged in a USB wireless dongle that I had lying around, and it came right up. Now it's completely portable around the house, no longer tied to the router. I attached a cheap webcam I had gotten a while back on ebay, and I installed motion, as per a nice how-to, and immediately the Pi became a surveillance system.

I was going to set it up in front of the house, but then I got the idea I wanted to interface it to my electronic piano in the living room. I got a $6.75 MIDI-to-USB cable and attached the Pi to the piano. Previously I had an identical cable working nicely with a midi keyboard and my Suse desktop. This one did not seem to register as a midi device; I'm going to have to find a driver, or else write some software of my own. My goal is to have a tablet-controlled midi sequencer, so that I can record midi to the Pi and play it back through the piano. A bigger project than I've had time for up to now, but I hope to get to it soon.

It's a fun little board and I highly recommend it to anyone who enjoys hacking around with Linux and automating things around the house. There's probably fifty other uses for it that I haven't thought of yet.

To avoid criticism, do nothing, say nothing, be nothing. -- Elbert Hubbard

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