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+ - OpenStreetMap adds easier reporting of map problems

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "OpenStreetMap recently topped 1 million registered users. Now they are trying to make the barrier to entry for contributing to the project even lower. A new "notes" feature, announced on the project's blog, allows anonymous users to submit bug reports which will alert mappers in the area to incorrect or incomplete map information. The feature also allows for commenting on notes, potentially enabling two-way communication between a mapper and a bug reporter if more information is needed."

Comment: Re:Wikimapia (Score 5, Informative) 58

by yellowbkpk (#42549773) Attached to: OpenStreetMap Hits One Million Registered Users
Wikimapia does not distribute their data with an open license. Even if they did, every single drop of their data was derived from Google Maps satellite and map data, breaking the Google terms of use. I imagine if you tried to do anything serious with Wikimapia data you would get slapped by Google.

Comment: Re:OSM allows to hide your contributions behind DR (Score 1) 58

by yellowbkpk (#42549733) Attached to: OpenStreetMap Hits One Million Registered Users
This is incorrect. OpenStreetMap changed licenses midway through 2012 from CC BY-SA to Open Database License. Apple has not confirmed that they're using OSM data, but if they are they would most likely be using OSM data that was obtained before the license change and is thus CC BY-SA. As far as I understand it both licenses allow data to be distributed "behind DRM".
Image

Microsoft Exec Says, "You'll Miss Vista" 273

Posted by samzenpus
from the cold-day-in-hell dept.
Oracle Goddess writes "'Years from now, when you've moved on to Windows 7, you'll look back at Windows Vista fondly. You'll remember its fabulous attributes, not its flaws.' That's the opinion of Steve Guggenheimer, vice president of the OEM division at Microsoft. 'I think people will look back on Vista after the Windows 7 release and realize that there were actually a bunch of good things there,' Guggenheimer said in a recent interview. 'So it'll actually be interesting to see in two years what the perception is of Vista.' A dissenting opinion comes from Bob Nitrio, president of system builder Ranvest Associates, doesn't believe organizations that skipped Vista will ever regret their decision. 'I don't think for a second that people are suddenly going to love Windows 7 so much that they will experience deep pangs of regret for not having adopted Vista,' said Nitrio. If I had to bet, I'd go with Bob's take on it." My first thought was, Steve meant Windows 7 is designed to be virtually unusable as payback for all the complaints about Vista, but I might be biased.
Image

Your Browser History Is Showing 174

Posted by samzenpus
from the wasted-days-and-wasted-art dept.
tiffanydanica writes "For a lot of us our browser history is something we consider private, or at least not something we want to expose to every website we visit. Web2.0collage is showing just how easy it is (with code!) for sites to determine what sites you visit. When you visit the site it sniffs your browser history, and creates a collage of the (safe for work) sites that you visit. It is an interesting application of potentially scary technology (imagine a job application site using this to screen candidates). You can jump right into having your history sniffed if you so desire. While the collages are cool on their own merit, they also serve as an illustration of the privacy implications of browser history sniffing."
Government

+ - Secret Visit by SF Mayor Spurs Password Confession

Submitted by Mz6
Mz6 (741941) writes "The San Francisco computer engineer accused of withholding access codes to the city's network surrendered the password during an unusual jailhouse visit by Mayor Gavin Newsom, authorities said Tuesday. Newsom came away with the access codes Monday night after talking with Terry Childs, 43, of Pittsburg, who has been held since July 13 on four felony counts stemming from what prosecutors describe as an effort to block administrative access to the network that handles 60 percent of the city's information, including sensitive law enforcement, payroll and jail booking records. Childs had given officials what turned out to be bogus passwords and then had refused to give the correct ones, even when threatened with arrest, authorities say. But Monday, Childs' defense attorney Erin Crane contacted the mayor's office, setting in motion the secret visit."
Slashdot.org

+ - What do we think of the Opinion Center?

Submitted by DuncanE
DuncanE (35734) writes "In case any (all?) of you didn't notice the slashdot opinion centre recently switched from AMD to INTEL. You may have also noticed as a logged in user some subtle and not so subtle javascript thingys (technical term) promoting this change over. I for one would prefer to see the so called "opinion centre" pieces posted as articles in the main window. Sure highlight them in the nice lime(y) green, make um clear they are ads and then we can all tell Intel exactly what we think about their articles. Plus slashdot can probably charge a heap more to Intel for the privilege.

The weird think is I'm not joking. As long as its kept to a reasonable level and maybe its not exclusive to Intel, I think it could actually be a interesting experience for both us, the slashdot community, and them, the IT vendors. So what do you think?"
Handhelds

+ - Are Mobile Phones Wiping Out Bees?

Submitted by Mz6
Mz6 (741941) writes "It seems like the plot of a particularly far-fetched horror film. But some scientists suggest that our love of the mobile phone could cause massive food shortages, as the world's harvests fail. They are putting forward the theory that radiation given off by mobile phones and other hi-tech gadgets is a possible answer to one of the more bizarre mysteries ever to happen in the natural world — the abrupt disappearance of the bees that pollinate crops. Late last week, some bee-keepers claimed that the phenomenon — which started in the US, then spread to continental Europe — was beginning to hit Britain as well. The theory is that radiation from mobile phones interferes with bees' navigation systems, preventing the famously homeloving species from finding their way back to their hives. Improbable as it may seem, there is now evidence to back this up."
The Internet

+ - Social networking sites opening up

Submitted by
prostoalex
prostoalex writes "Business Week magazine is looking at social networking sites opening their APIs to third-party developers to enable social applications not supported by the network itself. Facebook is setting an example by releasing their API from beta into 1.0, and many others are expected to follow the suit, since Facebook API now serves as a backbone to 100 or so applications: "Since Facebook, a network of 17 million college students, started a pilot program last summer, third-party developers have created some 100 new applications. Now a Facebook user name and password can be used to log in to content-sharing and chat site Mosoto, and to automatically import Facebook friends into Mosoto's buddy list for chat. Facebook itself does not offer a chat function""
Privacy

UK Propose Registering Screen Names with Police 282

Posted by samzenpus
from the in-england-you-only-get-one-online-name dept.
Oxygen99 writes "In a series of kneejerk suggestions following this online rape plot, the UK Home Secretary, Dr John Reid has suggested that offenders on the Sex Offenders Register should register their online identities with the police. According to a home office spokesman this means that offenders, 'online identities would be treated in exactly the same way as their real name'. So, just how misguided is this and who's going to be the first to tell him?"

How many hardware guys does it take to change a light bulb? "Well the diagnostics say it's fine buddy, so it's a software problem."

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