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Comment: Re:And cheaper, right? (Score 1) 323

by yacc143 (#48456823) Attached to: LinkedIn Study: US Attracting Fewer Educated, Highly Skilled Migrants

Well, and after how many days as unemployed do you get deported. Don't know about H1B in detail, but e.g. the preferential work visas for Aussies mean that you have to leave the country after being 7 days unemployed.

And your comment about "2 weeks and 2 months" is not a very correct observation, California is like most US states a at-will state. That means, if your employer does not like you, http://www.business.ca.gov/Sta... you are gone today. And the legal thing to do at this moment is not look for new work, it's looking for a ticket and moving your home back to a country where you are allowed to stay.

Comment: Re:Well of course (Score 1) 323

by yacc143 (#48456199) Attached to: LinkedIn Study: US Attracting Fewer Educated, Highly Skilled Migrants

Well, the problem is that most jobs don't require an on-site presence. (Cynically put, a doctor remotely on-demand plus a nurse practitioner can handle most doctor's work. Most trade can be delivered remotely. Administration can done easily enough from everywhere as long as your internet connectivity is good enough, and don't start me on IT.)

Comment: Re:Well of course (Score 1) 323

by yacc143 (#48456177) Attached to: LinkedIn Study: US Attracting Fewer Educated, Highly Skilled Migrants

Well, if Norway is protectionist, that's really new to me.

Norway, while not politically member of the EU is member of the European Economic Area, meaning that for all practical purposes (beside sending representatives to the European Parliament, Commission, and so on), it's member of the EU.

As such it's clearly in the free trade camp.

OTOH, as Americans might mix it up, yes they have a more communal society, which is a common for Scandinavian countries. But at the same time it's clearly free trade oriented. The fascinating part here is naturally, because they have a high technology industry, some natural resources and so on, so yes they can make the great benefits work, because overall their products remain competitive on the global market.

Hint: Even US companies tend to treat certain employees well (e.g. the ones that produces revenue, are hard to replace, ...).

The problematic employees are the one that are easy to replace, don't produce a great deal of money => these tend to end up outsourced. The big issue here is that there is no solution for these parts of the population, Norway seems to handle this with trying to maximize their human capital (Hint: Scandinavian schools, despite tiring sometimes with their continuous quest for improvement [I have a colleague there with kids], tend to be good, and not good just for a tiny slice of the pupils), and allowing the not so productive part of the population a somewhat dignified life.

Btw, while the free trade argument that every body does what he can do most effectively is usually accepted, free trade DOES have a number of issues that are starting to pop up in literature, e.g. Free Trade does not work for developing countries (probably mostly because of the same reason why it does not work for easy-to-replace workers), and then there are these ecological costs (transport costs are currently artificially kept low, as being taxed lower or completely exempt).

Comment: Re: Huh (Score 1) 136

by yacc143 (#48371935) Attached to: Apple Releases iMessage Deregistration Utility

Ok, I want to know when person X (any person using a mobile phone) is reachable, so I can voice call him.

Some fascinating observation, just because you have GSM service, that does not mean you have data service (especially when one is at the edge of network coverage, or e.g. while roaming).

With SMS, you send a nice message with "delivery report" enabled, and the next time that teenager with behaviour problems is reachable, your phone will notice you via the delivery report. Next step, call said teenager (that sadly happens to be related to this parental unit), and discuss your concerns.

Basically, SMS is standarized part of the GSM standard for decades now. With rather exact semantics. Apple tried to implement a short circuit this with their own service, and by doing so broke the semantics of this (in some way nowadays very simplistic looking) service.

So it's absolutely correct that they get sued. The sad reality is that repeated inability to receive and/or send messages can cause significant damage.

(send: "Hi Boss! My kid is in the hospital, will contact you in a couple of hours" => depending upon the boss you might find yourself out of work if you disappear for a couple of hours, and hospitals tend to have poor reception. Same thing the other way: "Hi John! We do have an issue here with VIP customer, please call me ASAP".)

I know, that might sound over the top, but I have lost a contract in a similar scenario (you only need to have a team lead with a bad temper, that has a bad day).

+ - Silkroad 2.0 shutdown->

Submitted by yacc143
yacc143 (975862) writes "On Thursday, the FBI announced that it has done it again, seizing Silk Road successor Silk Road 2.0 and detaining 26-year-old Blake Benthall in the same city. Silk Road 2.0s seizure comes amid reports of various other anonymous narcotics marketplace shutdowns on Thursday as global authorities look to be cracking down on illegal dark web operations."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Time for a revolution (Score 1) 424

by yacc143 (#48259105) Attached to: Law Lets IRS Seize Accounts On Suspicion, No Crime Required

Well, Nazi Germany did it too.

Interestingly, not even the evil Communists did this, they might have issued passports (with the note that they do not authorize the holder to return to their country), but even in the Cold War period, if you managed to emigrate legally, they let you take your property with you.

Comment: Re:Time for a revolution (Score 1) 424

by yacc143 (#48259093) Attached to: Law Lets IRS Seize Accounts On Suspicion, No Crime Required

Which btw is atypical, most other countries link "paying taxes" to "residency". The US also have an "exit tax" which you pay if you want to get rid of the US citizenship. The only other occurrence of such a sick thing that comes would be how the Nazis treated emigrating Jews.

One really has to wonder how this civil forfeiture thing managed to survive without being challenged as unconstitutional, I mean the protection of property is rather spelt out in the US Constitution.

Let's organize this thing and take all the fun out of it.

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