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Comment Re:This is only true (Score 2) 354

When what's legal and what's sustainable for the society are not aligned, there are likely one of two results: 1) Law is changed to be more sustainable or 2) the society suffers.

But hey, more power to those who can screw over everyone else for their tax free money!

If what the company is doing is not sustainable, the company will fail, as it should. If what society is doing is unsustainable, it will fail, as it should. It's called capitalism and if you leave it alone, you'd be surprised at how good it works.

What would you propose? We block companies from doing these kinds of inversions? They'd just transfer their entire operation overseas and then the US would see zero percent of that income. There are any number of other countries that would LOVE to have them, as is evidenced by their lower tax rates and success in luring said companies.

The stupidity is the assumption you can somehow control these companies, or punish them for their actions. Controlling them is impossible so long as there are other places to do business. Punishing them does nothing but punish those who consume their products or services. Putting them out of business adds to unemployment. Banning their products or services from the US market would damage consumers *and* employees. You know...employees...those people who work hard every day to take home a paycheck to their families. Not everyone at a corporation is Scrooge McDuck burning hundred dollar bills to warm their gold-plated mansion.

No, the answer is to lower our corporate tax burdens and win this business back to US shores and the US tax system. It doesn't take a genius to realize that 15% of something is better than 26% of nothing.

Comment Re:Heinlein quote. (Score 1) 378

I hate to sound obtuse or unimaginative, but I'm wondering WHY anyone would want to colonize the Kuiper Belt? Other than scientific curiosity -- which is best served by robot probes -- what's to be gained by living there that you can't accomplish elsewhere in our solar system for much less cost and risk?

I can think of only two immediate reasons: those desiring the ultimate in autonomy and those fleeing population pressure. The former would be pretty extreme and would somewhat depend upon the latter happening first. The latter would have to be extreme indeed to the point where all the reasonably-habitable areas inside Pluto's orbit are already filled up, probably requiring hundreds of billions if not trillions of human beings assuming high population densities in, on, and orbiting every available planetary body and moon in the solar system.

Of course there's always the "because it's there" option for adrenaline junkies, but again you'd have to deplete all the other slightly-less-extreme objectives within the solar system before you'd need to hit the Kuiper Belt. And the expense involve would be beyond the reach of even the most intrepid adrenaline junkie.

Comment Re:After RTFA (Score 1) 157

Funny, I read it as incomplete review which wasn't very forthcoming (or accurate) on details: "The public inquiry was poorly conducted and did not allow people to get the full information," said Ms Sageloli. " The published notice was hard to understand and did not clearly indicate that it concerned a data center. "

Please note the passage you quote is being mouthed by the person leading the charge against the data center...hardly an unbiased source. What did you expect her to say? That she utterly failed to look into the project during the review period and thus wants to retroactively punish the data center for her laziness and apathy?

This is PRECISELY why public reviews are held in the first place. Only seven people even SHOWED UP to the review, yet 424 now complain about the data center.

I've dealt with data centers for a good chunk of my IT career. It strains the imagination to think they failed to disclose they'd have chillers and stored diesel, as one or both are pretty much standard fare for any data center anywhere on the planet. The site layout would've REQUIRED them to have these items outside the data center in plain view, which means the space planning would've show where they needed to go, which means the official proposed plans DID include them during the review.

Comment After RTFA (Score 3, Informative) 157

After RTFA, I made this translation:

"Back in 2012 this company asked for a permit to build this data center. We, the local residents, didn't bother reading much of anything regarding it, didn't do any research whatsoever into what would be involved, and didn't show up at any of the hearings where these things were discussed. Now, after abdicating all personal responsibility years ago, we suddenly want to hold the data center owners responsible for our negligence. We've organized a squeaky-wheel-gets-the-grease campaign and co-opted local politicians and judges into doing our bidding because it gets them free publicity. In the end, the only losers will be the data center owners (and, of course, their clients) who, after all, are probably wealthier than we, the local residents, are and therefore we hate them."

Comment Another toy... (Score 0) 323

Another toy for the liberal elite to spend money on to somehow absolve themselves of all the guilt they feel for having money to spend on such toys, whilst simultaneously allowing them to look down their nose at the rest of us 'proles who have to drive these nasty, earth-killing, bunny-murdering cars that run on fossil fuels.

Get back to me when I can drive something that will carry me, my wife, and five kids 300 miles without have to stop for a 12-hour "refill" and costs under $40K.

Comment It's useful to consider the source. (Score 5, Insightful) 445

Look up Donna Ford's bio at Vanderbilt and you get this as her "Research Area":

Gifted with emphasis on minority children and youth; recruitment and retention of diverse students in gifted education; underachievement among diverse students; equity issues in testing and assessment; multicultural education; issues in urban education.

So basically Ford's entire area of expertise depends on FINDING bias in these programs. Perhaps she should acquaint herself with Confirmation Bias. If you look hard enough for anything, you'll find it whether it's there or not.

Further, the bias is explained by Ford as a fault of the gifted program, but she completely neglects CULTURAL FACTORS that also bias gifted involvement. There is, generally speaking, a cultural bias in the black community AGAINST academic excellence. It even has a name: "acting white." Blacks who use proper spelling and grammar are called "Oreo's," a derogatory term indicating they're "black on the outside but white on the inside." This is especially bad in poorer neighborhoods where "leaving the hood" is considered akin to being a racial traitor. Act like a thug, dress like a thug, eschew education in favor of "hanging out" and you're accepted. Anything else and you're ostracized.

Don't believe it? Ask around. It's common knowledge. Nobody wants to say it but everyone knows it's going on.

Comment Re:Mission accomplished (Score 1) 399

Right, and Germany is sunnier than the USA

Strawman. I never said anything of the sort. That said, Germany is spending heavily to IMPORT power from neighboring countries. You might've missed that fact.

No they don't because in today's world, unless you are right on the grid path, it is often cheaper to just run solar or wind turbine. The grid isn't all that any more.

Remind me again what portion of the INDUSTRIALIZED FIRST WORLD runs off of local wind turbines and/or local solar? Oh, that's right: not much. There's a perfectly good reason for that: it's not reliable power like grid power. Solar doesn't work when it's cloudy, at night, or when panels are covered by snow. Wind doesn't work unless it's windy. Grid power works all the time, every time. Power that isn't there when you need it most is rather useless.

Solar/wind is a good solution SOME OF THE TIME IN CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES. But only a fool -- and a obsessive fool at that -- maintains that it's a practical alternative to grid power in places where grid power is available.

Oh, and nice dig at Fox News, not that it's remotely relevant to the discussion. But it does show your bias.

Comment Uber isn't stupid (Score 3, Interesting) 230

Uber isn't stupid. They know the existing transport monopolies are maintained due to political connections aka lobbying. Uber knows there is no way it will be able to upset this status quo without support from local politicians. That, unfortunately, means lobbying. Love it or hate it, it's how things get done these days.

Comment Do you want a diversity hire? (Score 5, Insightful) 287

Google hires people based on talent. Women and minorities are under-represented in the technical and engineering community. That is a fact of life. Until more women and minorities CHOOSE to enter this field, getting a "diverse workforce" would have to mean you exclude more qualified white males in order to hire less qualified minorities and women.

Think about that for a moment. Suppose hospitals did things this way? If you need critical brain or heart surgery, do you want your surgeon to be one of the best in his or her field, or one that was a "diversity hire"?

Until you're comfortable with the second option, this "diversity" idiocy needs to stop. It's one thing to exclude perfectly qualified candidates because they're female or minority. It's another thing to make that the primary reason you're hiring them instead of making sure they're the best qualified for the job.

Comment Re:You don't have to go faster (Score 2) 226

How exactly is space expanding, and what exactly is expanding into?

This is difficult to answer without getting into a long discourse on spacetime. However, you have to get away from the notion that there is some kind of "edge" to the universe and space is somehow expanding that edge into infinite nothingness. There is no "edge" to the universe anymore than there is a definable "edge" to our planet (i.e. a flat earth).

Comment Poorly written (Score 2) 226

Poorly written article and misleading summary. Basically the article says you can "travel faster than the speed of light" without violating relativity...but neglects to mention which "speed of light" you're beating. Light speed is different in depending upon what medium -- or lack thereof -- it's traveling through. It's possible to slow light down to the point where you can walk faster than that speed of light. But you're not violating relativity by doing so because you're moving through a different medium.

So, hyperdrives...not so much.

You know you've landed gear-up when it takes full power to taxi.