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Comment: Re:Wow. (Score 4, Informative) 279

by xianthax (#33692550) Attached to: CIA Drones May Have Used Illegal, Inaccurate Code

i don't think you understood the article or didn't read it.

The software wasn't the guidance system for the drone, control it in anyway, or even run on the drone itself. Its running in some data center some where tracking where people are when they use a cell phone or an ATM, etc.

Its just a mapping package for laying out data thats correlated to geography, its just "google earth - government edition".

I doubt the 13m really mattered, your not getting 13m accuracy anyway when tracking a cell phone via tower transitions.

The CIA was using it to find potential targets so they could send a drone toward them, they'd have to get more specific information as to the exact target location elsewhere.

Comment: Let em use whatever they want, catch em. (Score 2, Insightful) 870

by xianthax (#33569318) Attached to: Preventing Networked Gizmo Use During Exams?

Let em use whatever device they want and lay out the rules for no communication or internet access.

Be vigilant, Make it a goal to catch the cheaters.

At the end of the day the college degree you get is just your ticket in the door at a company, If you really know your stuff your performance will take you far.

If you know how to find the answer to a problem by tapping your network of contacts you will likely go farther. (the cheating your worried about)

If you can't figure out how to cheat on a physics test in college your probably going nowhere so weed these people out.

In all seriousness i would rather hire the person who found some elaborate way to cheat while avoiding detection than the person who worked for 3 weeks to get a B on the test. The enterprising cheater is probably far more inventive but was just bored by the material, thats a skill set that I can work with. Working for 3 weeks to pass a basic physics test isn't.

Comment: Re:Multicore ARM and suboptimal instruction sets (Score 2, Informative) 283

by xianthax (#33535958) Attached to: ARM Unveils Next-Gen Processor, Claims 5x Speedup

What i assume he means is:

CAS - Compare and Swap

LL/SC - Load-Link/Store Conditional

Without getting into too much detail both are design concepts/operations that are critical components of any system that requires atomic operations. For example, implementing semaphores/mutexes which are in turn critical components of most symmetric multi-processing systems such as the linux kernel (when so configured), or windows. While these operations are most critical in multi-core systems, single core systems also have a large need for such operations.

Because these are such critical operations in modern operating systems, there are specific instructions in processors to handle them, for instance CAS is implemented in the CMPXCHG instruction in x86. In ARMv6 and above atomic operations are built using LDREX/STREX.

I'm guessing he's saying that LDREX/STREX aren't capable, are slow, or something, never really looked at the issue.

Comment: Re:Three drinks a day is "heavy"? (Score 1) 470

by xianthax (#33428792) Attached to: 3 Drinks a Day Keeps the Doctor Away
I call bullshit on your statistics, for reference i fall into the 2-3 per day camp, averaged over a week. The WHO lists the US at 8.6 liters per capita per year of pure alcohol consumption. Since alcohol is so heavily controlled in this country, i'll tend to believe this data more than what people say they drink as sales figures are more reliable. Especially considering the stigma around alcohol in this country which will certainly impact what people say they consume. That figure comes out to ~363, 5% 16oz beers per person, per year. Or ~605 watered down crappy beers. If 35% are abstaining and only 10% have more than 1, those 10% are seriously killing it, to the tune of 5 - 8 drinks a day. Probably more as i imagine many who answered as 1 a day probably drink only a couple a week. I seriously don't believe 10% of the population is throwing back ~8 beers a day on average, thats creeping up on hammering down a fifth of booze a day, an area reserved for those with real alcohol problems.

Comment: Cool photos, Standard RF Testing Chamber (Score 2, Interesting) 229

by xianthax (#32942884) Attached to: Inside Apple's Anechoic Testing Chambers

good job on the photography but these are pretty standard anechoic RF testing chambers. The only news worthy thing is that Apple is main-steam enough that people actually looked at these photos.

Any company doing serious RF development will either have their own and rent time in a dedicated testing facility.

Search google for "anechoic chamber" and you'll find hundreds of photos of such facilities.

The US Air Force has one big enough to park a C-130 in :)

Comment: The Science Behind This (Score 1) 561

by xianthax (#32919152) Attached to: Sound As the New Illegal Narcotic?

Beyond all the 'states of consciousness' debates and how stupid it is that anyone is worried about this (people have used it to meditate for years) this is very scientific.

What they are really doing is just building a poor mans sensory deprivation tank.

Your mind generally keeps track of where your body is by a few things, effects of gravity, vision, and most importantly your body's 'gyroscope' is the inner ear.

By laying down on something soft and not moving you partially remove gravity (true sensory deprivation tanks suspend you in a liquid to do this and thus are far more effective).

By covering your eyes completely you remove vision as a positional reference.

Bi-aural sound effects can induce certain types of brain waves, but they also throw your inner ear gyroscope all out of wack.

Combine the 3 and you've removed your brain's ability to understand where your body is and in what position its in.

This is where the 'out of body' feeling comes from, without a grounding reference the rest of your brain is free to introduce sensations of movement. If you imagine your flying like a bird your brain no longer has a grounding point saying 'you know man, your not REALLY flying'.

The rest of the audio in these tracks in there to 'guide' you into a mental state, induce certain types of brain wave usually with the goal of inducing a lucid dreaming type of state.

Some people tweak out because of this, generally people that hate feeling out of control. Sensory Deprivation tanks have even been used a form of torture. You can also purchase time in them commercially to relax, some spa's have them.

Some people love it, and the people that love it probably are more likely the ones who are also into other forms of mind altering (drugs or whatever). Not that i'm saying its a 'gateway' to anything, if your the type of person that loves this type of experience you don't need a gateway, your already wired to enjoy these things, which is good in my opinion. Everyone needs to let go sometimes.

Comment: Did anyone actually read the paten (Score 4, Insightful) 144

by xianthax (#32705822) Attached to: USPTO Grants Bezos Patent On '60s-Era Chargebacks

Did anyone actually read the patent?

The summary author is an idiot and clearly doesn't understand the patent or simply didn't read it.

They didn't patent measuring and charging for computer resources.

They patented predicting resource utilization at a particular point in the future and varying charging at that time.

They basically patented the ability to charge users hosting services with them based on response time and performance, they implemented this capability by predicting loads at a point in the future.

Sounds like they don't want to charge by the RAM/disk usage/CPU time etc anymore but would rather charge based on guaranteed performance.

Also this isn't a software patent at all. They effectively patented a business model.

If you want to argue the merits of that, fine, lets at least stick to the real issue.

Comment: Re:I love moderates (Score 1) 1318

by xianthax (#32618572) Attached to: Pakistani Lawyer Wants Mark Zuckerberg Executed

your history of the bible is slightly misleading. The original Greek manuscripts that, some of which, would eventually be known as the new testament were written in the first century AD.

It wasn't till 315AD till the was really decided which of the manuscripts written would be part of 'The New Testament' so in many ways what picture the new testament paints wasn't created till several hundred years after the supposed events and the picture wasn't chosen by the original writers.

The king james bible wasn't printed until 1611AD and still included the Apocrypha. Even this version has some rather comical changes made in the process of translation compared to the original greek manuscripts.

TL;DR your right that the original manuscripts were written in the first century AD, your very wrong if you think the modern, common translations are accurate to the original and have not been tainted by thousands of years of corrupt church influence.

(i'm an atheist for the record btw)

Comment: Re:Snow Job (Score 1) 467

by xianthax (#32582796) Attached to: The South Carolina Primary and Voting Machine Fraud

More like this:

*Poly Sci Degree from USC
*Intelligence Specialist in Air force
*Unit Supply Specialist in Army (how do you get busted out of an intelligence job in the air force to being a lowly 'supply specialist' in the army?)
*Gets kicked out of the Army (involuntary honorable discharge)
*Guy with a poly sci degree and experience as a 'intelligence specialist' remains unemployed for 9 months and lives with daddy.
*Randomly writes a $10,000 check to run for seat.
*Raises 0 money, runs word of mouth campaign driving around in his '03 automobile.
*Gets hit with a felony pornography, gets public defender because hes broke.
*Wins Primary when polls indicated hardly anyone knew who he was.

How, on earth, is this entire situation NOT suspect to you?

"The vast majority of successful major crimes against property are perpetrated by individuals abusing positions of trust." -- Lawrence Dalzell

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