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Comment: Re:i don't understand the premise of the post (Score 1) 52

every freedom has limitations, natural limitations dictated by logic and reason, not big bad government arbitrarily limiting your freedom

namely, when you use your freedoms to infringe on other peoples's freedoms

such as their freedom to live, and live free of threats

it is illegal to to threaten lives. it's the only logical position. to *preserve* freedom, you see

there's a certain kind of selfish moron who thinks freedom means "i can do anything i want, damn the consequences." of course, true freedom only exists with true maturity and responsibility, which understands freedom to mean "i can do anything i want, as long i don't infringe on the freedom of others"

Comment: Re:Remeber (Score 1) 93

yup, well said

many of us also remember our youth fondly. when the teenage years are the most psychologically painful periods of a human life

we all have it. we forget the bad, and remember the good. it's also why people think things should be "like the good old days," to mythologize the past and always think things are getting worse. the truth of course that the past was more violent, poorer, and unhappier

it's a fundamental human conceit. historical myopia

Comment: Re:Sanders amazes me (Score 1) 361

by circletimessquare (#49608687) Attached to: Bernie Sanders, Presidential Candidate and H-1B Skeptic

you want to take away the government?

you want to magically remove corruptibility from the human race?

you don't want to go after the slimy assholes doing the corrupting?

you're a moron, really. not a baseless insult, an objective evaluation of your thinking. you want to ignore corruptors and focus only on the corrupted. fucking stupid

Comment: Re:Sanders amazes me (Score 1) 361

by circletimessquare (#49608531) Attached to: Bernie Sanders, Presidential Candidate and H-1B Skeptic

yes, absolutely, political corruption is a crime with a corruptor and a corrupted

why do you want to focus all blame on only one side of a deal that is the fault of two sides?

why do you focus zero blame on the guy who is paying for and often initiating the corruption? you think it's only innocent corporations being reached out to by sleazy politicians? seriously?

Comment: Re:human overpopulation (Score 1) 117

by Kjella (#49608117) Attached to: Empty Landscape Looms, If Large Herbivores Continue to Die Out

Essentially, we need Africa to become more economically developed as soon as possible, and when that happens, it's almost certain that they'll follow the same trends that we've seen in happen in other developed countries: stabilizing populations and more serious efforts to protect their natural resources and environment. Unfortunately, we can only encourage these countries to protect their natural assets, but there's really nothing we can do short of that.

1. Well large land animals are an important source of tourism. Tourism is a huge source of income for many poor countries in Africa, like for example it's 12% of the GDP in Kenya. Most governments want to protect them and is willing to accept aid, it's individuals that want to poach them for personal gain. Which basically means they'll take funding, equipment, personnel, anything you're willing to give really. Granted, they'll probably not care so much about CO2 emissions or whatever. Then again, neither do Americans.
2. The reason the poachers are being so successful is because they're well funded from abroad, they're not fighting against the poor man in the street but heavy criminals propped up by first world technology. We can do a lot to try cutting off this supply, catch the smuggling, prosecuting the buyers, tear down the organizations and so on. It's organized crime, just not in a shape we see much of in the western world.

Comment: Re:Remeber (Score 3) 93

i see it as a similar conceit to anti-vaxxers

anyone who grew up when it was common for children to die at a young age due to common diseases would vaccinate wholeheartedly. but, distant those horrors, the effort necessary to maintain the status quo of healthy children becomes all you see: vaccinations, sticking needles in children, strange concotions i don't understand...

likewise, you have these similar fools who see the benefits of a regulated marketplace, but only see the onerous regulations, and not the horrors of what an unregulated marketplace is really like. so they react to the regulations as if they are the actual evil, just like anti-vaxxers

anyone who survived (broke) one of the many banking panics of the 1800s would claim the FDIC the greatest godsend. but, now that we don't have runs on banks, we just have this "evil" "world domination" "freedom destroying" scheme called the FDIC: morons think the FDIC is the actual evil

it's a conceit of lack of experience, lack of education, no awareness of history, prideful ignorance

Comment: Re:bad statistics (Score 1) 189

by Kjella (#49606387) Attached to: Chrome Passes 25% Market Share, IE and Firefox Slip

Maybe because Net Applications is the only counter that tries to correct for known skewed sampling. Net Applications uses CIA internet usage data (how much of the population in each country has access to the Internet) to estimate absolute numbers for each country based on the measures distribution and the "Internet" population number. Net Applications is perfectly honest and upfront about this.

And yet if I look at StatCounter's map function, showing the leading browser in each country Chrome leads in most of the world. IE only leads in Japan, South Korea, Swaziland (pop. 1.1mio), Greenland (pop. 55000) and Antarctica (5000 visitors). Firefox has a few strongholds like Germany, Indonesia, Myanmar, Bangladesh, Iran and a bunch of countries in Africa, but the only place IE is ahead of Chrome in second place is Iran (pop. 78mio). With Chrome winning on walkover in Europe, South America, North America, Africa and Oceania and taking massive wins in China, India and Russia I don't see how any possible weighting of StatCounter's numbers would put IE on top.

Comment: Re:Not exactly a hack (Score 3, Interesting) 72

by ColdWetDog (#49605567) Attached to: Hacking the US Prescription System

Your pharmacist has sold your prescription data to some shady third party for advertising purposes. Somehow they managed to loophole that out of HIPAA - it's a 'service' for your own good - or something along those hallucinatory lines.

Supposedly you can opt out but you first have to know if you got opted in.

I'm actually surprised that this hasn't generated much flack, but there are so many things to get angsted at I think that most people are just overwhelmed. Personally, I ran out of extra angst a long time ago.

Comment: Re:Pretty much no service providers catch things.. (Score 1) 225

They finally kicked me over to another department (tech guys I think) who found that a previous tenant, years earlier, had the emergency only (life-line) service. It had been "disconnected" in the system in every way as far as billing and such were concerned, but wasn't actually physically disconnected. The tech guys were finally able to fix it. (...) This is a case where you'd think their system would be able to detect that calls were being placed by a residence that had no service. Nope.

I don't know how it is in the US, but here in Norway you can dial our equivalent of 911 from any cell phone, connecting to any tower in range regardless if it has service or even a SIM card and I assume landlines work on the same principle. That the service was "disconnected" just means they don't have any obligation to keep it working, but they're not going to block any 911 call ever, I don't know if there's a law but the bad publicity would be a disaster. So this is probably by design and a feature, not a bug but customer service was probably not aware of this.

They might not even have access to the raw call log, since their user interface probably revolves around services and calls tied to a service. After all how often do you have a phone line with no service dialing 911 - because that's the only place you can reach - then calling customer service complaining that the call came through? This was a 0.01% corner case and I'm not surprised they thought it "impossible" and had to escalate to someone with real knowledge of the inner workings of the physical network.

Comment: Re:Interesting... (Score 1) 503

by ColdWetDog (#49604015) Attached to: Tesla Announces Home Battery System

While I don't hold myself out as an expert in rack mounted UPS systems, I can safely say that APC is pretty bad after tossing a bunch of them out shortly after they're purchased.

I have found the folks at Don Rowe helpful for power inverter stuff. In my case for marine applications. I really like the KISAE inverters / UPS - have three of them that have been running for over a year in some fairly tough conditions.

But there has to be a better professional vendor than APC. Even their mid range stuff is put together like typical Chinese consumer electronics. The KISAE units are much better finished and have beefier PCB boards, mountings and hardware.

Comment: Re:Sanders amazes me (Score 2) 361

by circletimessquare (#49603599) Attached to: Bernie Sanders, Presidential Candidate and H-1B Skeptic

plenty of those wealthy only get their wealth by warping the laws of the land to bring more wealth in their direction. we're not talking about hard working small business owners here, we're talking about parasites

additionally, i am not sure why we should worry about these "patriotic americans" fleeing the country being that doing so would give us more leverage to seize the means of their ill gotten gains, which is the real problem

so good fucking riddance should they flee

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