Become a fan of Slashdot on Facebook

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment Re:You must be new here (Score 5, Insightful) 1825

NO NO NO NO NO NO NO

I have mod points right now. I could easily have downvoted this. BUT there are enough people who think you are insightful to mod you up and simply modding people DOES NOT add to the conversation.

If you disagree with a comment
Post. A. Reply.

Do NOT stifle discussion just because you disagree with someone. I've modded people up who I think are horribly wrong about something but they make a good point and are adding to the discussion in a meaningful and non-toxic way so they are free to hold different opinions.

I cannot say this strongly enough. DO NOT DOWNMOD JUST BECAUSE YOU DISAGREE! We need to be free to disagree with each other and hold opinions that differ from the norm so that we can talk about this stuff. If we just downmod people we disagree with this whole site becomes an echo chamber of whatever the predominate pre-held opinion is. We should never encourage people to mod IN ANY DIRECTION (up or down) simply because of agreement or the lack thereof. Mod based on the informative nature, the insightful nature, the funny nature, etc. of the post. NOT HOW MUCH IT COMPLIES WITH YOUR WORLDVIEW!

Comment Re:Web Split (Score 2) 61

American living in Mozambique (country to the immediate east of S.A) here.

We didn't notice at all. I had no idea this had happened until I saw this story here on slashdot.

It's funny, Mozambique is FAR less developed than our neighbors to the west (South Africa). Enough so that I routinely make trips there to purchase cheaper/better goods than can be found here and/or to relax and find some comforts that are unavailable here. Yet our internet connection is MUCH faster, more reliable, and cheaper than anything I've seen there in S.A. We have plenty of failing infrastructure but, luckily, our internet fiber is holding up.

Comment Re:Cost vs Benefit (Score 2) 386

It's hard for me to believe what I'm reading from so many commenters on this article.

Can we pause for a minute and try a different perspective on this?

Imagine a group of Thai media personalities/scientists/NGO-Creators (this appears to be what most of these "experts" are) sitting around a table with video cameras on them discussing "Look at that big 'Mississippi river' running right down that big continent. How's about we build a bunch of hydroelectric damns along that thing and generate energy for ourselves. I mean, it's just sitting there."

Now imagine ANYONE taking them seriously.

WHY THE HELL DO PEOPLE ACROSS THE ENTIRE WORLD HAVE ANY RIGHT TO BE TALKING ABOUT USING LAND WITHIN SEVERAL DIFFERENT SOVEREIGN NATIONS FOR THEIR OWN PURPOSES AS IF IT'S JUST THERE FOR THE TAKING???

Now back to the actual situation. It's breathtaking how arrogant it is to talk about the Sahara as if Europe could just go in there and use up that land because "it's just sitting there". Would the Swiss be OK with someone from Chad talking about going into the Swiss Alps and just harvesting all that snow/ice to ship back to Chad all casual like they have every right to just go use that?

Seriously???

You don't talk about using up Canada's vast Yukon wilderness for wind turbines and sending all that energy off to China and then just say "It's politically complicated". IT'S SOMEONE ELSE'S FSKING LAND YOU HALFWIT. OF COURSE YOU CAN'T JUST GO BUILD YOUR OWN DAMNED INFRASTRUCTURE IN THE YUKON AND SEND ALL BENEFITS BACK TO YOUR OWN COUNTRY.

My GOD. Sometimes it looks like people don't realize that Africa actually has PEOPLE here who THINK, FEEL, SENSE LOSS, HAVE FAMILIES, TRADITIONS, FAITHS, HOPES, and actually wish there weren't crumudgeonly old men talking about their homelands as if it's just there for the taking as long as we bribe the local asshole who has the most guns.

Comment Cancer Martial Metaphors (Score 5, Insightful) 35

died Sunday after a battle with brain cancer.

For people who live with cancer, it's actually been found that's it's better to not use martial metaphors. For many cancer patients, the emotional journey is hard enough without feeling like they are "losing a battle" or "losing a fight" etc. with cancer. Even family members of those who've died with cancer often struggle with the emotions of feeling like someone "lost" or they "didn't fight hard enough". Living with cancer is not always something that has to be fought, especially brain cancer.

More on topic, Wes Craven was an artist and we will miss his art. Go well Mr. Craven.

Submission + - Buzz Aldrin publishes moon expenses form

An anonymous reader writes: Proving once again that the government has a form for everything, Buzz Aldrin has unveiled his Apollo 11 documentation on social media over the past few days, including a travel voucher detailing his expenses on his trip to the moon. The papers listed him as having been on a "work trip" from his home in Houston, Texas that had taken him to the moon and then back again with a total expenses claim of just $33.31. The report notes : "Government meals and quarters [were] furnished for all of the above dates.”

Comment Re:Instilling values more important (Score 1) 698

I'm wasting mod points to agree here.

I have a bit of experience in this area. I live in a developing country and house cancer patients in my home. When they are terminal and the hospital cannot help anymore I help them get back to their families (often 1000+ miles away) or offer them a comfortable place to die and bring families to them (resources permitting). The biggest thing that I've found that these families need is to know and be known by their dying father/mother/etc. before the end. The "life advice" is a nice part of that but when I can encourage and facilitate a father opening up to his son or daughter about his past, his failures, his thoughts, his pain, his love, his adventures, his first kiss, his best friends in grade-school, his favorite games of soccer in school, how he met his wife (the child's mother), and any number of other stories... THESE things are what the grown child treasures. OP: I would advise making individual videos that each tell a story from your past. Talk about times you were disappointed. Talk about the humbling secrets that others cannot tell because no one else knew the story but you. If you list off your achievements it means little. Your wife and family members know those. Tell her about when you first learned about science and what joys it brought. Tell her how you felt when you started educating others and the way your heart flipped when you met your wife. Tell her how your almost dropped her when she was born because you were so emotional. Tell her that you knew so little about being a father that you put the diaper on wrong the first few times. Tell her about watching her grow and how frustrating and hard it was to be self-sacrificial for those years and how much it took out of you to do that. Tell her that she was worth so much more than the years you've been given to be self-sacrificial.

These stories and emotions will, I believe, be treasured far more than encouragement to pursue understanding differential equations, elliptic curve encryption, chemical biology, Linux kernel contributions, or any number of geeky things.

Well done for caring about how you leave your family. That is rare and you are to be commended for it. I like to tell my patients that they are not running out of time. They are running into eternity. You don't have to drag your feet in this. There will be tremendous pain and there will be devastating days and nights as your body weakens. You are running into eternity OP. I hope you run your race well.

Spartacus

Submission + - Researchers Block HIV Infection In Monkeys With Artificial Protein (sciencemag.org)

An anonymous reader writes: Immunologists have developed a synthetic molecule that's able to attach to HIV and prevent it from interacting with healthy cells. "HIV infects white blood cells by sequentially attaching to two receptors on their surfaces. First, HIV’s own surface protein, gp120, docks on the cell’s CD4 receptor. This attachment twists gp120 such that it exposes a region on the virus that can attach to the second cellular receptor, CCR5. The new construct combines a piece of CD4 with a smidgen of CCR5 and attaches both receptors to a piece of an antibody. In essence, the AIDS virus locks onto the construct, dubbed eCD4-Ig, as though it were attaching to a cell and thus is neutralized." The new compound was tested in monkeys. After successively higher injections of HIV, all four monkeys who received the compound beforehand stayed from free infection. Any potential treatment is still a ways off — the researchers plan more trials in monkeys before bringing humans into the test.

Comment Re:The science is great (Score 1) 396

I live in Mozambique. Check my posting history. This is my home. I'm an American but have lived here for about 5 years and don't have plans to go anywhere.

There are VERY LARGE CORPS that do massive scale farming here. These corps receive large subsidies from the government here, mostly because they negotiated freakishly one-sided deals many years ago when the government was a baby and prone to being taken advantage of. These corps get "free and unimproved seeds" from the government and it is important that those policies change so these large corps actually start having to buy their seed and so that they sell quality food to Mozambicans.

I work and spend every day with very poor Mozambicans. They do not buy their seed. By the way, the time frame on that co-operation policy was to do that by November 2012. Again, I am with poor, subsistence farmers in Mozambique every day. They are not buying expensive seeds and being locked into some expensive cycle. They harvest their crops, replant what they can from their crops, purchase from each other the seed they don't have from their own crops.

Also, it's worth noting that the report The Guardian is quoting from has a bullet point RIGHT BELOW the one you bolded and hyped. Here it is: Implement approved regulations governing seed proprietary laws which promote private sector investment in seed production (basic and certified seed).

This is just to point out that the government here is thinking about making sure that proprietary seed DOESN'T lock poor farmers into some expensive cycle. I know it makes for a shocking story to pretend like things are black and white/good and evil but, at least here in Mozambique, there is more than just "ZOMG, THINK OF TEH POOR AFRICANS AND THEIR FARMS!"

Comment Flying Cars (Score 2) 75

Could this tech finally solve the "everyone would need a pilots license" problem of consumer level flying cars? Maybe cars could be developed that rely on the person inside the to drive on roads but as soon as liftoff is initiated an auto-pilot like this one DARPA is making could take over completely removing the human factor from the flying hunk of metal.
Not saying it's imminent but perhaps this is a step in the direction of ubiquitous personal flying vehicles that could solve a lot of transportation problems and get people/things to places "as the crow flies" instead of "as the wolf runs". It would just be an automated crow instead of a human one.

Comment Re:"Unfair"? (Score 5, Informative) 362

It bothers me too. In my opinion it's part of a subtle temptation and accidental attitude that is very common in humanitarian/NGO/missionary work.

Let me explain.

I am a missionary working in Sub-Saharan Africa trying to fill a hole in the medical care here. In a developing country there are expected and predictable shortcomings in the medical system and I find myself trying to help cancer patients where the State cannot. Now, the tempting mindset is to hope that the State never actually develops enough to do what I do, thus, I never find myself redundant and always feel needed and like I’m filling a purpose. That is, of course, a horrible thing to hope. Of course I hope my service is redundant soon and of course I hope that what I do won’t be needed soon. That would mean fewer people were suffering! That would be great! It would also mean I’m no longer needed and I could find myself and my family in some trouble looking for a new place to serve.

The “I hope the problem never goes away so I never find my cause pointless” mindset is what is likely going on here. Erin McElroy of the SF Anti-Eviction Mapping Project likely dedicates her (his?) entire life or, at minimum, most of his (her?) emotional energy on this project and so any progress Google and others make to help things get better means Erin is more and more redundant and less and less needed. That is a scary thing for someone who lives for a cause and therefore, while fighting for their cause, there is often a self-defeating hope that the cause never actually succeeds.

That’s just what I’ve noticed in the “I have a cause” field at least. YMMV.

Comment Slashdot linking to Slashdot (Score 4, Insightful) 108

Why the hell is this here? There have already been like 50 other stories about how important Snowden was/is and now /. feels it's important to post a ridiculously redundant story of their own that is JUST A BUNCH OF OTHER LINKS to other news sites? WTF /.?

Seriously...

wtf???

Slashdot Top Deals

I have a very small mind and must live with it. -- E. Dijkstra

Working...