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Comment: The S in scientist stands for... (Score -1, Offtopic) 96

by xTantrum (#40256313) Attached to: CERN: Neutrinos Respect Cosmic Speed Limit
...sheeple...too bad it didn't start with a P. smh. It was a sad day when I learned that for all their training to think logically and to seek out truth...Scientist were just like everyone else. They want to stay in line, they don't want to buck trend...god forbid someone proves the great god Einstein wrong. That would be blasphemous! I'm not saying neutrinos don't follow the cosmic speed limit, I'm just asking: would any of them have the balls to step up and claim it? Every day that passes I lose more respect for my fellow natural philosophers. every day.
Yes, I'll be modded down, yes some will think this is flamebait but the next generation wont.

Comment: NDA Much..? (Score 0) 139

by xTantrum (#39483385) Attached to: Kim Dotcom Alleges Studios Wanted to Work With Megaupload
Maybe dotcom was approached by studios...maybe he wasn't. What I do find hard to believe though is that these studio execs - if they did contact megaupload - didn't have a standard Non-Disclosure agreement between them before they started talking. This would prevent Kim from talking about this stuff or sharing it with anyone else. Find that very hard to believe...

Comment: Right Tune...wrong lyrics... (Score 4, Interesting) 277

by xTantrum (#39137277) Attached to: Interrupted Sleep Might Be the Best Kind
I think Ekirch's research is obviously correct but his conclusions might be a little off. it's well known already people tend to lose productivity during the afternoon in the modern day workplace. This is why the Europeans have their siesta . Prior to the industrial era and the advent of lighting yes, we may have had our circadian clocks synced to this pattern prof. Ekirch talks about. However, it is Post-Industrial now, many countries around the world have constant non natural light and many individuals work around the clock and have varying shifts. As a result, the need for sleep - or "power naps" - hasn't changed, our clocks have just synced to a different schedule. Where you are in the world and the personal schedule you have will determine the optional time for that cat nap needed to recharge.
Again, it's not that we don't need to "sleep" twice in a day, more than likely we do. there is evidence that points to its benefits, however as we are finding out with medicine today, it would be and should be tailored to the individual and their schedule.
Google

Internet Giants To Honor the 'No' In 'No Tracking' 118

Posted by timothy
from the mighty-gracious-of-them dept.
theodp writes "The WSJ reports that a coalition of Internet giants including Google has agreed to support a do-not-track button to be embedded in most Web browsers — a move that the industry had been resisting for more than a year. The new do-not-track button isn't going to stop all Web tracking. The companies have agreed to stop using the data about people's Web browsing habits to customize ads, and have agreed not to use the data for employment, credit, health-care or insurance purposes. But the data can still be used for some purposes such as 'market research' and 'product development' and can still be obtained by law enforcement officers. Meanwhile, after Google got caught last week bypassing privacy settings on Safari, and was accused of also circumventing IE's P3P Privacy Protection feature, CBS MoneyWatch contacted Mozilla to see if it had noticed Google bypassing Firefox's privacy controls. After reports that Google ponied up close to a billion dollars to Mozilla to beat out a Microsoft bid, this seems to be one of those have-you-stopped-beating-your-wife type questions that has no good answer. Anyway, according to a statement attributed to Alex Fowler, global privacy and public policy lead for Mozilla: 'Our testing did not reveal any instances of Google bypassing user privacy settings.'"

Comment: Re:This is why we need China.... (Score 1) 191

by xTantrum (#39004949) Attached to: NASA To Drastically Cut Mars Mission Funding
Only time will tell my fellow canuck. The recent census put us at 33.5 million but give us a few more years and increase in population. Our politicians btw are just as corrupt as the states and civil liberties erroding just as fast. U can keep your face in that beer and ignore the reality of the situation: canada is just as bad as the states, with as much ambition. We march lockstep with them, for now though we're content to let them be the bad guys while we work on our own nefarious goals. Just ask Harper :)

Comment: I'd love to see some numbers on this... (Score 1) 297

by xTantrum (#38974359) Attached to: If You're Fat, Broke, and Smoking, Blame Language
but it's still interesting. FTFA

while English and Greek speakers are statistically poorer and in worse health than Germans.

Greece is in serious financial trouble and Quebec (primarily french) is going the same way and has been called the Greece of Canada.....interesting....and of course Germany is a economic powerhouse of the EU.

Comment: Re:Objective-C growth (Score 1) 356

by xTantrum (#38693546) Attached to: 2011's Fastest Growing Language: Objective-C

Of course, if you don't take the Tiobe rankings seriously [timbunce.org], than all of this is moot, but I guess it's something to talk about on a Friday.

It's so funny to see so many taking the Tiobe index as an actual indication of a language's true popularity. I remember a few years back as a noob, when the site hackers.com was still around. I used Tiobe to show just how popular C was... circa 2002 - and I was laughed off the board. One senior member just systematically tore me a new one and why Tiobe was a crock of ish....sigh. sure wish that site was still around. :/

Comment: Re:Manan Kakkar could be less of an idiot (Score 3, Interesting) 582

by xTantrum (#38629754) Attached to: Leaked Memo Says Apple Provides Backdoor To Governments

I think it highlights the importance of a common labelling for software in the same way that other consumer products have. In the past I thought it was important to have software labelled for "phones home", "displays adverts", "closed source", now this would require "has government mandated backdoors".

Yes, but you're still trusting the goverment to do this and the point that should be seen here is we can no longer depend on elected officials to look out for the people. All this simply reaffirms is what Richard Stallman has been preaching for awhile now. It is up to the people to educate themselves and take the proper precautions. Of course the 99% won't and cannot and thus this is the reason we will soon see an event like Arab Spring spreading to the west. Sounds a bit crazy but the revolution will be here...soon.

Top Ten Things Overheard At The ANSI C Draft Committee Meetings: (9) Dammit, little-endian systems *are* more consistent!

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