Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:SOP for Test Equipment makers (Score 1) 273

by x0 (#47622331) Attached to: Hack an Oscilloscope, Get a DMCA Take-Down Notice From Tektronix

So when will this magical free market fix things and have someone sell a fully featured out of the box scope at the base model price?

Why are you expecting a 'fully featured' box for base model pricing? What is fully featured? What needs fixing? Products have tiers, and while the HW (sometimes) is the the same across those tiers, the software is not. Expecting that software for free is unrealistic.

As for the market driving prices down, it's happening all of the time. Rigol released the DS1052 5-6 years ago for cheap, and that drove Agilent to release the DSOX2000 at a pretty good price. The Rigol DS2000A is very competitive with the low end Agilent and Tek scopes, and will further drive down the costs.

On this site, I'd expect more people to call for an open architecture where OSS analysis software could be loaded to fully utilize the hardware versus complaining about 'fixing' things to make the high end models cheap.

I

Comment: SOP for Test Equipment makers (Score 4, Interesting) 273

by x0 (#47613177) Attached to: Hack an Oscilloscope, Get a DMCA Take-Down Notice From Tektronix
All of the manufacturers now ship devices fully kitted and use licenses to unlock/enable additional features. It's less expensive to manufacture one SKU, and then differentiate models by selectively enabling features.

At least one of the Chinese manufacturers has know about these hacks for quite a while and apparently isn't doing much about it. I expect that they are allowing this to obtain more market share from the hobbyists as I doubt most commercial operators would void warranties.

Tek is essentially selling a software package as a value add, and they'll charge what they can until Agilent/Keysight one ups them with less expansive software.

+ - Which is better, Adblock or Adblock Plus?->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Wladimir Palant is the creator of the Adblock Plus browser extension, but he often gets asked how it compares to a similar extension for Chrome called Adblock. In the past, he's told people that they're achieve largely the same end in slightly different ways, but recent changes to the Adblock project have him worried. "AdBlock covertly moved from an open development model towards hiding changes from its users. Users were neither informed about that decision nor the reasons behind it." He goes through the changelog and highlights some changes that call into question the integrity of Adblock. For example, from an update on June 6th: "Calling home functionality has been extended. It now sends user’s locale in addition to the unique user ID, AdBlock version, operating system and whether Google Search ads are being allowed. Also, AdBlock will tell getadblock.com (or any other website if asked nicely) whether AdBlock has just been installed or has been used for a while — again, in addition to the unique user ID." Of course, Palant has skin in this game, and Adblock Plus has dealt with fallout from their "acceptable ads policy," but at least it's still developed in the open."
Link to Original Source

+ - Senate Bill Would Ban Most Bulk Surveillance->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Today Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT) introduced a bill that would ban bulk collection of telephone records and internet data for U.S. citizens. This is a stronger version of the legislation that passed the U.S. House in May, and it has support from the executive branch as well. "The bill, called the USA Freedom Act, would prohibit the government from collecting all information from a particular service provider or a broad geographic area, such as a city or area code, according to a release from Leahy's office. It would expand government and company reporting to the public and reform the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, which reviews NSA intelligence activities. Both House and Senate measures would keep information out of NSA computers, but the Senate bill would impose stricter limits on how much data the spy agency could seek.""
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Already been done. (Score 1) 214

by x0 (#47449867) Attached to: Economist: File Sharing's Impact On Movies Is Modest At Most

The logic is that if all of those things cost $50 (in reality KC's book was like $30 signed and everything and Dark Souls was $40 with a bunch of pre-order discounts) each, whichever one I pick wins the competition for my money. At that point, I no longer have the money to spend, and thus can't buy either of the other things. Even if I pirate KC's book and the film, they still haven't lost a sale because I wouldn't have been able to buy it anyway. ,That was more or less how I remember the study's logic going.

Wait... What?

I'm not sure about your final sentence saying that you paid KC back later. Are you saying you DLd KCs book, then later purchased it, or you purchased the book, then DLd one of the other two items on your list?

If it's the latter, your logic is that you bought one item due to budget constraints, and being short of cash, you pirated^W downloaded a copy of something else you wanted. Since you didn't have any additional cash (after the first purchase), the other folks haven't lost a sale. No harm, no foul.

If that is what you are saying, then I have to call BS on that. The original artist/producer/manufacturer provides a product with the expectation that people who want to enjoy that product should pay a fee. You are saying that, since you don't have the 'fee' available, downloading harms no-one as there wouldn't have been a sale anyway.

However, you benefited from the product without paying the fee, so you got something for nothing. How is that not theft?

m

NOTE: If you want to argue that data wants to be free and that you should have to right to DL anything, from anywhere, at any time, the line for limitless free shit forms over there --->

Comment: Re:Puppet. (Score 1) 265

by x0 (#47434051) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Unattended Maintenance Windows?

I NEVER do late at night or weekend maintenance anymore. Servers are dirt fricking cheap to not have redundants always running and ready to drop in.

Sure, hardware is cheap - software licenses, not so much. (An no, I don't have the option to use free/oss replacements.) When it costs my company $25,000 per license, deploying a primary and two 'backup' servers is not really an option.

m

Comment: Bad assumption... (Score 1) 399

by x0 (#46858869) Attached to: Japanese and Swiss Watchmakers Scoff At Smartwatches
For those who like Swiss watches - or even high end Japanese watches (Seiko Spring drives..), a smart watch is not necessarily an 'upgrade'. I choose to wear a mechanical watch because I like mechanical watches.

Sure, I have a G-Shock for when I'm going somewhere a Swiss timepiece isn't a good idea, but for the most part, I wear a Swiss automatic - usually a stainless Rolex GMT Master II. (pepsi bezel, baybee!) Why? Because I like the way it looks, and it's about as close to jewelry as I'll ever get.

A smart watch with an LCD/OLED display just isn't going to rival the look of a decent mechanical watch...

If I want a smart device, that is why I have a Galaxy S4.

Comment: Re:Redesign the body too... (Score 2) 398

by x0 (#46816593) Attached to: Will the Nissan Leaf Take On the Tesla Model S At Half the Price?

It's an odd looking car because every design decision was made to decrease drag, which has a huge impact on range at highway speeds. The most notable feature on the front is the big bug eye headlight covers. They push air out of the way and create low pressure bubbles around the rear view mirrors- decreasing drag.

No doubt the design was done that way for a purpose. It's still a highly unattractive car. The tesla, on the other hand has a CD of .30 compared to the Leaf's .28.

I'll give up the .02 for a better looking car.

m

Never test for an error condition you don't know how to handle. -- Steinbach

Working...