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Comment Re:Who reads the manual? (Score 1) 457

MPEG-LA is producing a subassembly of the camera (video encoding), therefore they are a sub-manufacturer (like Delco for the alternator that goes in your car). Copying is illegal because of copyright; my refrigerator has a stipulation in the manual that it "isn't for commercial use", but that's not (and shouldn't be) legally enforceable - all it does is invalidate the warranty; American Electric Motors can't sue me for a share of the revenues if I use the fridge with their patented compressor technology in my ice cream stand. Their opportunity to get paid was dealing with the fridge manufacturer.

Comment Re:Who reads the manual? (Score 1) 457

Copying copyrighted material is a matter between you and the copyright owner - not the copier manufacturer. If a photographer uses his camera to take pictures of copyrighted paintings/statues (for example) and resell them, the camera manufacturer makes no difference.

Comment Re:The Cold Equations (Score 1) 673

Agree about the dangers of ash and erring on the side of safety - however, airplanes "falling out of the sky" is a common misconception. Most multiengine airplanes can land safely with 1 engine running, and even if all fail, pilots practice engine out approaches in basic pilot training - at high altitude, a jetliner can glide up to 100 miles if the optimum lift/drag airspeed (different for different airplane models and one of the important emergency numbers for pilots to know) is maintained. This is one reason that most airline accidents occur during takeoff/landing - stalls, etc (while more likely due to slower speeds) have less room to recover. Unfortunately, the presence of the cloud over the oceanic portions of the airline routes will cause problems even with the glide range, since an expert ditching in the North Sea still results in a lot of cold wet passengers.

To communicate is the beginning of understanding. -- AT&T