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Submission + - SF Says AdWare Bundled with Gimp Is Intentional (google.com) 5

tresf writes: In response to a Google+ post from the Gimp project claiming that "[Sourceforge] is now distributing an ads-enabled installer of GIMP", Sourceforge had this response:

In cases where a project is no longer actively being maintained, SourceForge has in some cases established a mirror of releases that are hosted elsewhere. This was done for GIMP-Win.

Editor's note: Gimp is actively being maintained and the definition of "mirror" is quite misleading here as a modified binary is no longer a verbatim copy. Download statistics for Gimp on Windows show SourceForge as offering over 1,000 downloads per day of the Gimp software. In an official response to this incident, the official Gimp project team reminds users to use official download methods. Slashdotters may remember the last time news like this surfaced (2013) when the Gimp team decided to move downloads from SourceForge to their own FTP service.

Therefore, we remind you again that GIMP only provides builds for Windows via its official Downloads page.

Note: SourceForge and Slashdot share a corporate parent.

Submission + - Bees prefer nectar laced with Neonicotinoids (rsc.org)

Taco Cowboy writes: Neonicotinoids are a class of neuro-active insecticides chemically similar to nicotine

Neonicotinoids kill insect by overwhelming and short-circuting the insects' central nervous system (See http://lee.ifas.ufl.edu/Hort/V... )

Shell and Bayer started the development of Neonicotinoids back in the 1980's and 1990's

Since this new group of pesticide came to the market the bee population have been seriously devastated in regions where the pesticide are been widely used

In 2008 neonicotinoids came under increasing scrutiny over their environmental impacts starting in Germany

In 2012, studies have shown that neonicotinoid uses are linked to crash of bee population (See http://usnews.nbcnews.com/_new... )

New studies, however, have discovered that bees prefer nectars that are laced with neonicotinoids, over nectars that are free of any trace of neonicotinoids (See http://www.rsc.org/chemistrywo... )

According to researchers at Newcastle University the bees may "get a buzz" from the nicotine-like chemicals in the same way smokers crave cigarettes

BBC also covers this case (See http://www.bbc.com/news/scienc... )

Submission + - Mozilla Teams Up With Humble Bundle To Offer Eight Plugin-Free Games

An anonymous reader writes: Mozilla and Humble Bundle today announced a new package that features award-winning indie best-sellers for which gamers can choose how much they want to pay. Naturally called the Humble Mozilla Bundle, the package consists of eight games that have been ported to the Web. The first five games (Super Hexagon, AaaaaAAaaaAAAaaAAAAaAAAAA!!! for the Awesome, Osmos, Zen Bound 2, and Dustforce DX) can cost you whatever you want. The next two (Voxatron and FTL: Faster Than Light) can be had if you beat the average price for the bundle. You can pay $8 or more to receive all of the above, plus the last game, Democracy 3. Previously, all of these indie games were available only on PC or mobile. Now they all work in browsers on Windows, Mac, and Linux without having to install any plugins.
Programming

Submission + - The Truth About 'Rock-Star' Developers (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "You want the best and the brightest money can buy. Or do you? Andrew Oliver offers six hard truths about 'rock-star' developers, arguing in favor of mixed skill levels with a focus on getting the job done: 'A big, important project has launched — and abruptly crashed to the ground. The horrible spaghetti code is beyond debugging. There are no unit tests, and every change requires a meeting with, like, 40 people. Oh, if only we'd had a team of 10 "rock star" developers working on this project instead! It would have been done in half the time with twice the features and five-nines availabilty. On the other hand, maybe not. A team of senior developers will often produce a complex design and no code, thanks to the reasons listed below.'"

Submission + - Selling used software licenses legal in Europe, even if downloaded

teslar writes: The Court of justice of the European Union has ruled that An author of software cannot oppose the resale of his "used" licences allowing the use of his programs downloaded from the internet (PDF). This follows a legal battle between German company UsedSoft (which does just that) and Oracle. From the press release: "By its judgment delivered today, the Court explains that the principle of exhaustion of the distribution right applies not only where the copyright holder markets copies of his software on a material medium (CD-ROM or DVD) but also where he distributes them by means of downloads from his website" (the principle of exhaustion of the distribution right means that "A rightholder who has marketed a copy in the territory of a Member State of the EU loses the right to rely on his monopoly of exploitation in order to oppose the resale of that copy").
Linux

Submission + - Linux blamed for 'leap second' embarrassment that humbled internet (techworld.com) 1

Qedward writes: The edition of a 'leap second' on Sunday — due to the miniscule slowing of the earth's rotation by 1.4 milliseconds per year — derailed the Amadeus Airline reservation system and resulted in delays of up to two hours for passengers.

"This incident was caused by the Linux bug triggered by the 'leap second' inserted into clocks worldwide on June 30th," read an Amadeus statement on the problem that beautifully understates a complex if predictable software issue affecting some Linux-based programs while leaving others untouched.

Which programs were left exposed? Anything with a Java component plus MySQL, Firefox, Thunderbird, and Debian, the latter causing server blades to 'go dark'.

Submission + - GlaxoSmithKline Pleads Guilty to HealthCare Fraud, Need to Pay $3B in Settlement

An anonymous reader writes: GlaxoSmithKline was forced to pay $3 billion for unlawful promotion of particular prescription drugs. They pled guilty to three counts of criminal information, two counts of introducing misbranded antidepressant drugs Paxil and Wellbutrin to interstate commerce and one count of failing to inform the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on the safety data regarding the diabetes drug Avandia.
Australia

Submission + - Australian Gov't Asks eBay To Name Sellers (abc.net.au)

beaverdownunder writes: In an effort to combat fraudulent claims lodged within its Centrelink welfare-payment agency, the Australian Government has asked auction-site eBay to name all Aussies who sold more than $20,000 worth of goods in the last year.

Should someone be found to have been doing such a high-volume of business on eBay while claiming Centrelink benefits but not declaring that income, they could potentially face prosecution.

However, the president of the Australian Council for Civil Liberties, Terry O'Gorman, says this action is a gross invasion of privacy.

"What we say should happen is that if police have probable cause for investigating someone, they go to a magistrate, they get a warrant and they access that person's eBay records that way," he said.

Censorship

Submission + - Politicians get 9 year old's blog shutdown, in retaliation for criticism (wired.com) 5

thej1nx writes: "Fed up of the frequently unhealthy lunches with limited salad options, provided by her School catering service/local council, nine year old Martha Payne from Argyll in Scotland started a cheeky blog, where she posted photos of her daily school meals and rated them. The blog gained quick worldwide attention, gathering over 2 million hits in just 2 months, with school children from around the world sending photos of their own lunches. The resulting public attention on its nutrition lacking food, shamed the local council into changing the skimpy unappetizing meals for healthier ones, after an initial month-long food fight with her.
Yesterday, the council finally retaliated by pulling her out of class and forcing her to shutdown her blog by informing her that she had been banned from taking photographs of the meals, due to the unflattering headlines appearing in the newspapers.
The 9 year old Martha had also started leveraging the blog by asking her followers to donate to a charity called Mary’s Meals that funds school food in Africa, and starting off herself by sending £50 that she got from a magazine that reprinted some of her photos. The effort which had raised £2000 so far, was also thus nipped down in its buds, by the vengeful council."

Security

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Is HTTPS snooping becoming more acceptable? 4

jez9999 writes: "I recently worked for a relatively large company that imposed so-called transparent HTTPS proxying on their network. In practice, what this means is that they allow you to use HTTPS through their network, but it must be proxied through their server and their server must be trusted as a root CA. They were using the Cisco IronPort device to do this. The "transparency" seems to come from the fact that they tend to install their root CA into Internet Explorer's certificate store, so IE won't actually warn you that your HTTPS traffic may be being snooped on (nor will any other browser that uses IE's cert store, like Chrome). Is this a reasonable policy? Is it worth leaving a job over? Should it even be legal? It seems to me rather mad to go to huge effort to create a secure channel of communication for important data like online banking, transactions, and passwords, and then to just effectively hand over the keys to your employer. Or am I overreacting?"
Robotics

Submission + - Paralyzed woman uses mind-controlled robot arm (extremetech.com)

MrSeb writes: "Using BrainGate, the world’s most advanced brain-computer interface, a woman with quadriplegia has used a mind-controlled robot arm to serve herself coffee — an act she hasn’t been able to perform for 15 years. BrainGate, which is being developed by a team of American neuroscientists from Brown and Stanford universities, and is currently undergoing clinical trial, requires a computer chip to be implanted in the motor cortex of the patient, which it then transmits to a computer for processing. Like all brain-computer interfaces, the user must train the software — but once this is done, you simply think of a movement, and the software moves the robot accordingly. Moving forward, the researchers would like to miniaturize the system and make it wireless — at the moment, BrainGate users have a box attached to their head, and they're tethered to a computer — which is OK for robot arm use at home, but obviously doesn't grant much mobility. The work was partly funded by DARPA, with the hope of creating more advanced prosthetics for wounded war veterans."

Submission + - US judge blocks indefinite detention of Americans (rt.com)

rastos1 writes: A US federal judge has temporarily blocked a section of the controversial National Defense Authorization Act that allows for the indefinite military detention of US citizens. In a 68-page ruling, US District Judge Katherine Forrest agreed on Wednesday that the statute failed to “pass constitutional muster” because its language could be interpreted quite broadly and eventually be used to suppress political dissent.
Canada

Submission + - Canadian Government Minister Thinks Ripping CDs Like Stealing Shoes (boingboing.net)

An anonymous reader writes: A Canadian government minister made an embarrassing analogy during debate over new copyright legislation, claiming format shifting was equivalent to stealing shoes when buying socks. Canada is trying to update copyright legislation again with Bill C-11 after previous attempts were thwarted through dissolution of the sitting parliament.
Security

Submission + - 100,000 DSL modems may loose their 'Net connection from Jul 9, says Paul Vixie (scmagazine.com.au) 1

Dante_J writes: Up to 100,000 DSL modems may loose access to DNS come July the 9th due to scripted web interface changes made to them by DNSChanger. This and other disturbing details were raised by respected Internet elder Paul Vixie during a presentation at the AusCERT 2012 conference.

Submission + - Julian Assange arrested in England (belfasttelegraph.co.uk)

SJ2000 writes: "Scotland Yard has confirmed that Julian Assange has been arrested by police in England... It is expected he will appear before an extradition hearing at Westminster Magistrates' Court today for a ruling to be made on whether or not he should be sent to Sweden."

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