Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Who's saying it is a warp drive? (Score 2) 158

by wonkey_monkey (#49616223) Attached to: No, NASA Did Not Accidentally Invent Warp Drive

While some are claiming this means things like warp drive [...] are right on the horizon

Who are these "some"? The article linked to by the sentence makes no mention of any claims of it being a warp drive.

And then this from the Forbes article:

When you come across an announcement like the one made by NASA Spaceflight a week ago: that NASA has made a successful test of the EM Drive — a propulsion engine that uses no propellant, seemingly violating one of the most fundamental laws of physics, while warping space in the process — you’d better make sure you aren’t fooling yourself.

The linked announcement makes no mention of warping space, so the bolded section seems inaccurately disparaging.

It sounds to me like the guy who wrote the article has fooled himself into believing that someone has claimed it's a warp drive for the purpose of being able to find something to write indignantly about.

Come to think of it, the writer doesn't even seem to be sure of who's who in this scenario. "When you come across an announcement [...] you'd better make sure you aren't fooling yourself." Why would I be fooling myself by simply reading an announcement? Surely it's the people who make the announcement that should make sure they're not fooling themselves. Which I might think they were, if they'd said anything about warping space. Which they didn't.

So just who are these apparently imaginary people that the summary/article is railing against?

Comment: Re:The question is (Score 5, Insightful) 158

by wonkey_monkey (#49616139) Attached to: No, NASA Did Not Accidentally Invent Warp Drive

If I understood correctly,

You don't.

it allows you to pre-warp some space ahead in your journey

No-one - that is to say, no-one with an ounce of scientific credibility - is claiming it's a warp drive. There's no reason to even start to consider the idea that it might be a warp drive. The article linked to by the summary with the words "some are claiming this means things like warp drive..." doesn't even mention any claims that it's a warp drive.

The Forbes article links to another article with these words:

When you come across an announcement like the one made by NASA Spaceflight a week ago: that NASA has made a successful test of the EM Drive — a propulsion engine that uses no propellant, seemingly violating one of the most fundamental laws of physics, while warping space in the process — you’d better make sure you aren’t fooling yourself.

And that linked article also doesn't even mention warp drive. Seems to me like some journalists need to calm down a little. "ZOMG! It's not a warp drive!!!" - yes, thanks, but no-one seems to saying it is.

It's a thing that appears to produce thrust by unknown means. That's all. It's very interesting, but it has nothing to do with anything that anyone would call a warp drive.

Comment: Re:Nonsense (Score 1) 147

by wonkey_monkey (#49613355) Attached to: Why Scientists Love 'Lord of the Rings'

Nonsense

It's precisely why I can't stand these books. I can't suspend my disbelief that middle earth exists, that magic exists, not the way they use or describe it.

You do know there are other people on this planet who aren't you, right?

I would imagine more scientists get into comics

And I imagine that... well, you can make your own joke there. But it doesn't make it true.

Comment: Same with people (Score 1) 80

Microsoft's AI Judges Age From Snapshots, With Mixed Results

The same mixed results you'd probably get with people doing it.

Just look at those two photos of Obama - he really does look older in one than the other. If you didn't know who he was, or if you found similar looking images of two distinct people, those age guesses would not seem wildly inaccurate.

Comment: It's Doctor Who, not Dr. Who... (Score 2) 33

by wonkey_monkey (#49601853) Attached to: Free Comic Book Day Event Features Neil Gaiman, the Simpsons

as well as Dr. Who

Nuh uh. Doctor, not Dr.

And that's not quite just pedantic nerdrage talking. Dr. Who is similar-but-different character from a separate fictional universe.

So there.

Interesting nerdfact: they were planning to refer to the Dr. Who films in the 50th anniversery episode as having been inspired by the real Doctor, but they couldn't afford the rights to use the posters.

Comment: Isn't it a poor test image anyway? (Score 5, Funny) 597

by wonkey_monkey (#49600793) Attached to: My High School CS Homework Is the Centerfold

From a purely technical POV, it's never seemed like a great test image to me. It's soft, the red channel is washed out, the blue channel is noisy, there's absolutely no green or cyan (in the sense of pixels where green is the strongest channel, or red is the weakest channel) and very little blue.

Also, they cropped out her knockers and bum.

Comment: It didn't go entirely to plan (Score 1) 76

by wonkey_monkey (#49595367) Attached to: Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin Launches Its First Rocket

The summary fails to mention that it didn't all go to plan:

The booster that took the capsule up is said to have failed on the way down.

It is supposed to land vertically and softly, ready for another flight, but a hydraulic problem meant this part of the mission did not go as planned.

I read "did not go as planned" as "ended in a spectacular fireball," but they haven't released any images or video of that.

Incidentally the BBC's headline was:

Jeff Bezos conducts New Shepard flight

which sounded to me like he'd gone up in the thing.

The fancy is indeed no other than a mode of memory emancipated from the order of space and time. -- Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Working...