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Comment: Spectrum (Score 3, Funny) 89

by wonkey_monkey (#48939745) Attached to: US Wireless Spectrum Auction Raises $44.9 Billion

Yellow everybody. Let's hope those who lost out in this auction aren't feeling blue about it. It'd be understandable to be green with envy, sure, but I hope no-one's seeing red, because the last thing we want is for things to turn violet. Orange you glad this hasn't happened? Best just to heave a cy-an move on.

Comment: Re:For all of you USA haters out there: (Score 1) 368

by wonkey_monkey (#48938009) Attached to: Why ATM Bombs May Be Coming Soon To the United States

Yes, the PIN part alone would be sufficient to protect against signature fraud.

As for skimming, you might be right about lightning, but that doesn't mean it's automatically nothing worth fixing. I found the following, although it's possibly a couple of years old:

ATM skimming costs U.S. banks almost $1 billion annually.
Cases reported to the Secret Service has grown 10% for the past 3 years.
Total annual loss of ATM and credit card skimming is $8 billion.

Remembering one news report certainly isn't any way to get a handle on the figures. In 2010 there was a case involving $1.8m taken from 1400 victims thanks to skimming. Anecdote Top Trumps!

Comment: Re:So can a flock of starlings (Score 1) 138

by wonkey_monkey (#48937943) Attached to: The Quantum Experiment That Simulates a Time Machine

When you're measuring properties of pool balls by bouncing other pool balls off them, why can't people just accept the limitations of what we're working with without turning to this strange philosophy that the particles wont "let" us look at them.

Because it's the "philosophy" which best explains what is observed. If you've got a better one, present it to the world (with evidence) and claim your Nobel prize.

Comment: Re:Meh. (Score 2) 138

by wonkey_monkey (#48932055) Attached to: The Quantum Experiment That Simulates a Time Machine

You can sort of simulate one. Build a device that flashes a light when you press the button - but slowly increase the delay from 0 to... well, I'm not sure exactly, 0.25s? Something like that.

Anyway, if you do this right, your brain will "edit out" the delay (something it does all the time to reconcile differences between the senses).

Then at some point, the device resets the delay to 0. Next time you press the button, your brain will convince you that the light came on before you pressed.

Comment: Re:So can a flock of starlings (Score 2, Insightful) 138

by wonkey_monkey (#48931991) Attached to: The Quantum Experiment That Simulates a Time Machine

Just because quantum mechanics doesn't make intuitive sense to you, doesn't mean you can come up with any old analogy and dismiss the work of people far more qualified in the field than you. Well, you can, obviously, but it doesn't make you right.

It's amazing, that if you know the starlings are flying east to west, and you can only detect a starling as a complete *flock* of starlings, and not see the individual birds, then the flock can jump back east, i.e. back in time, interacting with the previous version of itself.

How is "jumping back" analogous to "interacting with the previous version of itself"?

Gosh!

How about, instead of being condescending, you perform some experiments - or even just provide more than a half-baked analogy - to disprove the last 100 years of quantum mechanics? Obviously all the devices we've been able to create based on this hard-won understanding must be figments of our imagination...

So the thing you know as a photon, is actually a flock of something smaller that is sufficient in density to promote an electron.

Isn't that completely incompatible with the photoelectric effect? You know, the very phenomenon which lead to the concept of the photon in the first place?

Comment: Re:For all of you USA haters out there: (Score 1) 368

by wonkey_monkey (#48931587) Attached to: Why ATM Bombs May Be Coming Soon To the United States

because those chips are pure security theater, protecting only against the (quite rare) 'skimming' devices

Chip and PIN also protects you against having your card stolen and used in store, because the only verification is the signature - which is conveniently already on the back of the card for the thief to copy (and usually checked by a singularly uninterested human).

Secondly, how rare is "quite rare"?

How the authors conclude that this has anything to do with ATM bombings is a complete mystery.

Yes, that bit confuses me as well. The link that the Slashdot editors have added goes to a story about card data being hacked to allow unlimited withdrawals, and the like - not nicking someone's card and taking out their money.

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