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Comment: Bad Idea (Score 1) 160

by wisnoskij (#49330315) Attached to: Energy Company Trials Computer Servers To Heat Homes
Sure using the heat is great, but then use it to heat the corporate building it is housed in. A server needs a regulated environment not 110 degrees in the summer and -10 in the winter. It needs humility and dust control. And most of all it needs a room not filled with 5 yos and hot choco, and a teenager bouncing a ball off the outside of it. No competent insurer would even give insurance for commercial server in a residential house. There is no economical way to distribute servers into residential houses. If you want to distribute your servers and cut down on restate than find a why to house them in the back of Starbucks or some other business.

Comment: Re:Seems somewhat myiopic (Score 1) 213

by wisnoskij (#49317551) Attached to: Finland's Education System Supersedes "Subjects" With "Topics"
By subject separates the distinct skills. If you suck at math and are still trying to pass grade 9 mathematics you can still take grade 12 English and history. This method would means that if you are slightly slower than the average at any subject you are floundering and cannot progress. And everyone has a subject they are slower at than the rest.

Comment: Re:I fail to see how this is a bad thing (Score 1) 213

by wisnoskij (#49317529) Attached to: Finland's Education System Supersedes "Subjects" With "Topics"
There is a difference. Economics, geography, and history are intertwined and dependent on eachother. You need to understand the one to understand the other. Knowing the physics of trebuchets offers no further insight into history. In-fact since most of the people of those times did not understand them themselves it might actually make understanding that age harder. At the very least there is no benefit whatsoever in teaching projectile physics then as any other time before or after.

Comment: OK (Score 2) 213

by wisnoskij (#49317509) Attached to: Finland's Education System Supersedes "Subjects" With "Topics"
It makes a lot of sense to merge "economics, history, languages and geography" and talk about a slice of all of this while talking about really any event, organization, or nation. History is linked to all of these. But when do you teach calculus and chemistry? Even if you could find some reasonable time to intersperse them, it would never work. Some fields require current and indepth understanding of a whole host of concepts. Courses in Chemistry and mathematics are a constant ramping up of concepts. You cannot break it up without reteaching past concepts every time you do so.

Comment: Re:IBM selling Mainframes to the Nazis? (Score 2) 107

by wisnoskij (#49309557) Attached to: A Sucker Is Optimized Every Minute
You might be surprised. From Google:

Mainframe computers (colloquially referred to as "big iron") are computers used primarily by corporate and governmental organizations for critical applications, bulk data processing such as census, industry and consumer statistics, enterprise resource planning and transaction processing.

A computer is a general-purpose device that can be programmed to carry out a set of arithmetic or logical operations automatically

By those definition I think the stuff they had by WWII would of qualified. " used primarily by corporate and governmental organizations for critical applications, bulk data processing such as census, industry and consumer statistics" is the perfect way to describe the products IBM put out well before and well after WWII. The only thing we are missing is where they computerized mainframes? And I think they were pretty close. They definitely carried out arithmetical operations. And they definitively would of been customizable/programmable to a large extent; I am sure the same machine could be programmed to track a bunch of different data types and perform different arithmetic operations.

Comment: Re:IBM selling Mainframes to the Nazis? (Score 1) 107

by wisnoskij (#49309363) Attached to: A Sucker Is Optimized Every Minute
Well data tracking devices. Some of the first "computer" technology came about because of the governments wanting to track their populations (censuses). If I am remembering correctly IBM was founded by the guy who designed the "computer" capable to tabulating the yearly census at 1000x the speed of by hand (the population of America had grown at such a rate that it took considerably longer than the period between censuses to add up all the data). I think it is fair to label them mainframes, in reality it was something halfway between an abacus and a mainframe computer. It was of course even more important to keep track of the undesirables and their movements than of your entire population. So Head office (America) IBM did send the greenlight to produce some population tracking devices for the Nazis.

If you can't understand it, it is intuitively obvious.

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