Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: THE SPAMMER - EPISODE ONE (Score 1) 42

by MillionthMonkey (#47722763) Attached to: Couchsurfing Hacked, Sends Airbnb Prank Spam

The police kicked down the door, breaking the glass and maneuvering through the room with guns drawn. The living room was empty. They searched the kitchen. Nothing. One of them kicked in the bedroom door and swung his assault rifle in a wide angle as he crashed through.

Immediately he saw that the floor was covered with spam. A computer's hard drive had exploded under pressure and was oozing a liquid discharge of strange attachments and cryptic URLs across the desk and onto the floor. " Couchsurfing sucks... here's a better couch!" they yelled, one after another. Then the fumes struck him.

Overwhelmed, he stumbled backward, spraying vomit across the living room as he fell. He lay on the spammy floor unconscious, convulsing, muttering the same thing over and over. "Delete... delete... delete... delete..." The other officers quickly ran out of the front door, dragging him along by the legs as they struggled to cover their eyes which were lachrymating upon exposure to the spam. One of the units outside called for backup and unwound a yellow tape labeled "POLICE LINE - DO NOT EMAIL" around the residence. A forensics van pulled up, and several officers strapped rubber gloves onto their hands and Pentagon-surplus armored spam filters on their faces. They reentered the building, treading lightly, taking flash photographs, and laboriously stuffing individual spam emails into each of 10,000,000 Ziploc bags.

About twenty minutes later, Detective Protagoniste and the Commissioner arrived at the scene in their unmarked car.

"Well, what do you make of this mess, Detective?" asked the Commissioner, as they approached the building. Protagoniste picked up one of the bags, and held it up to the light, and replied, "Commissioner, as of now, the spam's been caught... but not the Spammer!"

Comment: Re:"Great minds think alike"... apk (Score 1) 169

by metlin (#47722387) Attached to: Professor Steve Ballmer Will Teach At Two Universities This Year

I would characterize those areas as IT and software engineering, and not necessarily Computer Science.

I would perhaps state that some areas of computing (e.g., systems design, architecture) are better grouped under software engineering, given their nature.

I almost feel that there needs a distinction between software engineering and computer science. To paraphrase David Parnas, computer science studies the properties of computation in general while software engineering is the design of specific computations to achieve practical goals.

Muddling the two disciplines causes heartache because you have people who are great at designing software, but cannot grok advanced math; and on the other hand, you potentially limit your solutions to what's within the realm of current applicability, without exploring other possibilities (e..g, reinventing new algorithms for quantum computation).

Comment: Re:"Great minds think alike"... apk (Score 1) 169

by metlin (#47722065) Attached to: Professor Steve Ballmer Will Teach At Two Universities This Year

I would add a nuance to your point and state that real world experience matters in IT, but not in CS.

Computer Science is more about algorithms, systems architecture, and a lot of math. I did very little programming when I did CS in grad school and a whole lot of pretty awesome math (computational complexity, graphics, optimizations etc). Not sure about undergrad, since I did ECE, which, once again, was a whole lot of math (DSP, control systems, engineering electromagnetics, circuit theory, VLSI etc).

In any event, real-world relevance is more important to IT than it is to CS. I would say that it is however somewhat important in engineering, which, once again, is a professional degree.

Comment: Re:Is he a scientist? (Score 3, Informative) 169

by metlin (#47719907) Attached to: Professor Steve Ballmer Will Teach At Two Universities This Year

B-schools often hire people who are not in academia per se, but have rich real world experience in solving business problems.

For instance, you will often find senior partners from top consulting firms teaching classes, because they bring to bear not just academic knowledge but also practical experience.

People who do their MBA are not there to just learn the latest and greatest management technique from academia -- they also seek to apply that to the real world.

And this is not just true for MBAs -- it is also true for law schools, medical schools, and many other professional degrees. You'll find former judges and lawyers teaching classes, and you'll find doctors and surgeons with real world experience tempering your academic knowledge with their real world experience.

Public policy is another area where you former civil servants often teaching classes.

Transportation

Berlin Bans Car Service Uber 340

Posted by samzenpus
from the not-here dept.
An anonymous reader is just one of many who have pointed out that things don't look good for Uber in Berlin. Berlin has banned car service Uber, which allows users to summon a ride on their smartphone, for not offering drivers and vehicles licensed to carry passengers, or full insurance cover, the German capital said. The ban takes immediate effect and Uber risks fines of up to 25,000 euros each time it violates the city's Public Transport Act, Berlin authorities said in a statement. Uber said on Thursday it would appeal against the decision, accusing Berlin of denying its people choice and mobility. "As a new entrant we are bringing much-needed competition to a market that hasn't changed in years. Competition is good for everyone and it raises the bar and ultimately it's the consumer who wins," said Fabien Nestmann, German General Manager at Uber. Undaunted by the setback in Berlin, Uber has launched uberTAXI in Hong Kong.

Comment: Remove the Bloat (Score 2) 151

by Hamsterdan (#47674121) Attached to: Can Our Computers Continue To Get Smaller and More Powerful?

As we're nearing the size limit for IC manufacturing technology, what about reducing bloat and coding in a more efficient manner.

Let's look at the specs of earlier machines

Palm Pilot. 33Mhz 68000 with 8MB of storage, yet it was fast and efficient.
C=64 1Mhz 6510 with 64k RAM (38 useable), also fast and efficient, you could run a combat flight simulator on it (Skyfox)
Heck, even a 16MB 66Mhz 486 was considered almost insane in early 1994 (and it only had a 340 *MB* HDD, and everything was fine. (I bought that in high school for AutoCAD)

Go back to the same efficient and small code, and our devices will seem about 10 times faster and will last longer.

Comment: Haven't they read The Stand??? (Score 0, Redundant) 213

by Hamsterdan (#47671119) Attached to: How to Maintain Lab Safety While Making Viruses Deadlier

Why are they doing this? there is absolutely *nothing* to be gained from this, except weaponization. (which is against the convention)

Let's say someone does the same in MIddle East, they would be carpet-bombing the place in the name of "but terrorists".

Seriously, could someone explain to me what could be gained from creating a deadlier critter?

While we're at it, let's add anthrax,HIV and Ebola into it, just to be sure it's deadly enough. Hey, let's bring smallpox back (altough I wouldn't be surprised if there was still some in test tubes somewhere)

Comment: Re:But we ain't gonna have a Big Cruch, right ? (Score 1) 35

by MillionthMonkey (#47670215) Attached to: Historians Rediscover Einstein's Forgotten Model of the Universe
Heat death is scheduled to happen a googol years from now. If the Big Rip hypothesis is true then the universe's life is already a half over. Then dark energy expansion will successively disintegrate galaxies, then solar systems, planets, humans, atoms, and protons in a cataclysmic disaster.

Every successful person has had failures but repeated failure is no guarantee of eventual success.

Working...