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Comment: Re:If true. If. (Score 3, Insightful) 169

We have a well-organized political-action group in this country, determined to destroy our Constitution and establish a one-party state

There has clearly been success in creating a one-party state. The party just happens to have two faces, but inside, there is no significant difference.

Comment: Re:It's systemic (Score 1) 231

by whoever57 (#47566891) Attached to: Comcast Confessions

Comcast has two mantras. Increase sales and cut costs.

Comcast is cr*p at doing the latter. Why did it take a callout to my house in order to get my cablecard working? The online system and their attempt to authorize the cablecard when I called in both failed, but why? All that happened during the callout was that the technician called his buddy to send the signal to authorize the cablecard. Then he changed a few connectors in the wiring -- probably to justify the callout.

Comment: Re:City of London Police =/= British Police (Score 3, Informative) 159

by whoever57 (#47557397) Attached to: London Police Placing Anti-Piracy Warning Ads On Illegal Sites

They are a police force specific to a small area, that doesn't mean they are governed by corporations.

Apparently you failed to read the section on elections in the City of London:

The City has a unique electoral system. Most of its voters are representatives of businesses and other bodies that occupy premises in the City.

So, yes, they are governed by corporations.

Comment: Expect many years before approved in USA (Score 2) 63

by whoever57 (#47555329) Attached to: UK Team Claims Breakthrough In Universal Cancer Test

Like many medical advances, this will likely take years before it is approved for use in the USA. Apart from the FDA being very slow, this would cut into revenues from colonoscopies.

Even things like better and safe sunscreen are available in other developed countries but not in the USA. Improved treatments for tooth decay took years before approval in the USA.

+ - The world of fan fiction->

Submitted by whoever57
whoever57 (658626) writes "The UK's Daily Telegraph has an interesting and somewhat balanced view of the world of fan fiction, providing an historical perspective, the different types of audiences and how different authors and publishers react to fan fiction. Of particular note, is how the author of Fifty Shades of Grey (originally a fan fiction based on the Twilight series) reacts to parties themed around the novel (not well). The article notes how some publishers and authors welcome fan fiction because it enables the original author to make more money."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Australia Deserves it. (Score 1) 125

Looks like Ozzy politicians are even more short-sighted and dumber than the sorry bunch of venal no-hopers currently running Westminster.

I wouldn't be too sure of that: Tory MP says astrology is good for the health "David Tredinnick, a member of Commons committees on health and science, says Britain should look to the stars to improve the nation's health"

Comment: Look over there, not here .... (Score 1) 77

by whoever57 (#47536067) Attached to: Compromise Struck On Cellphone Unlocking Bill

Meanwhile, the really important issues, such as the NSA spying on everyone are being ignored.

This is just a sop, aimed at geeks to get them to forget about Snowdon and many other important issues for a while, perhaps to make people think that the politicians actually care about what people think.

Comment: Re:Postal is an Ideological Fanatic (Score 1) 454

by whoever57 (#47505663) Attached to: MIT's Ted Postol Presents More Evidence On Iron Dome Failures

Sometimes it simply breaks the incoming missile or rocket into segments or destroys its ability to follow its planned ballistic path. According to Lloyd and Postol, if the warhead isnâ(TM)t destroyed the interceptor failed.

That assumes that a certain degree of accuracy is needed by the incoming missile. If the target is "somewhere within a 10 mile radius" and the missile is knocked off course by a couple of miles, then the missile is likely successful.

Comment: Re:I was in the same situation once (Score 1) 282

I was in the same situation once. Laid off by Northern Telecom in the late '80s, I started work as a contractor at their head office three weeks later for double what I'd been paid as an employee. :)

I was once part of a site closure, which resulted in some employees (unfortunately, not me) getting both early retirement (pension payments) and re-hired as contractors at significantly higher rates than their salaries had been.

Comment: Re:Just another reason not to fly..... (Score 1) 217

My wife and I decided, the next day that, short of an emergency situation, we were done flying commercial. If we couldn't drive to get there, we didn't need to go. It's not because we were afraid of terrorists, but we saw what a hassle and invasion of privacy it would became.

Some of us have families the other sides of oceans. It's not so easy to give up flying.

+ - Drone Search and Rescue Operation Wins Fight Against FAA-> 1

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Back in February, officials at the Federal Aviation Administration told a Texas search-and-rescue team that they couldn't use drones help locate missions persons. The team, which is called EquuSearch, challenged the FAA in court. On Friday, the court ruled (PDF) in favor of EquuSearch, saying the FAA's directive was "not a formal cease-and-desist letter representing the agency’s final conclusion." EquuSearch intends to resume using the drones immediately. This puts the FAA in the position of having to either initiate formal proceedings against EquuSearch, which is clearly operating to the benefit of society (as opposed to commercial drone use), or to revisit and finalize its rules for small aircraft entirely. The latter would be a lengthy process because "Congress has delegated rule making powers to its agencies, but the Administrative Procedures Act requires the agencies to provide a public notice and comment period first.""
Link to Original Source

+ - Enraged Verizon FiOS Customer Seemingly Demonstrates Netflix Throttling-> 1

Submitted by MojoKid
MojoKid (1002251) writes "The ongoing battle between Netflix and ISPs that can't seem to handle the streaming video service's traffic boiled over to an infuriating level for Colin Nederkoon, a startup CEO who resides in New York City. Rather than accept excuses and finger pointing from either side, Nederkoon did a little investigating into why he was receiving such slow Netflix streams on his Verizon FiOS connection, and what he discovered is that there appears to be a clear culprit. Nederkoon pays for Internet service that promises 75Mbps downstream and 35Mbps upstream through his FiOS connection. However, his Netflix video streams were limping along at just 375kbps (0.375mbps), equivalent to 0.5 percent of the speed he's paying for. On a hunch, he decided to connect to a VPN service, which in theory should actually make things slower since it's adding extra hops. Speeds didn't get slower, they got much faster. After connecting to VyprVPN, his Netflix connection suddenly jumped to 3000kbps, the fastest the streaming service allows and around 10 times faster than when connecting directly with Verizon. Verizon may have a different explanation as to why Nederkoon's Netflix streams suddenly sped up, but in the meantime, it would appear that throttling shenanigans are taking place. It seems that by using a VPN, Verizon simply doesn't know which packets to throttle, hence the gross disparity in speed."
Link to Original Source

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