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Submission + - Bradley Manning Pleads Guilty ( 1

Entropy98 writes: "Army Pfc. Bradley Edward Manning pleaded guilty Thursday to 10 charges that he illegally acquired and transferred highly classified U.S. government secrets, agreeing to serve 20 years in prison for causing a worldwide uproar when WikiLeaks published documents describing the inner workings of U.S. military and diplomatic efforts in Iraq, Afghanistan and around the globe.

The 25-year-old soldier, however, pleaded not guilty to 12 more serious charges, including espionage for aiding the enemy, meaning that his criminal case will go forward at a general court-martial in June. If convicted at trial, he risks a sentence of life in prison at Ft. Leavenworth, Kan."


Submission + - 3D Printer Could Transform Moon Dirt Into Lunar Base (

puddingebola writes: Researchers at Washington State University have found a new application of 3D printing. From the article, "With 10 pounds of simulated lunar dirt (or regolith) in hand, NASA officials approached researchers at Washington State University and challenged them to melt and resolidify the fake moon rock using 3D laser printing technology, which produces objects layer by layer based on a computer model." Using a simulant of the regolith, or powdery material found on the moon, the researchers "fed the raw simulant powder into a 3D printer, heating the material to high temperatures and printing it out in smooth half-millimeter (0.02 inches) layers to form small cylindrical shapes with no visible cracks. The structures that came out of the printer were about as hard as typical soda lime glass, the researchers explain in a study detailing the recent experiments in the Rapid Prototyping Journal. [10 Cool Moon Discoveries]"

Submission + - Korean operators warn Europe of "curse" of 4G networks ( 1

SternisheFan writes: "By Kate Holton and Leila Abboud, Feb 26 (Reuters) — South Korean telecom executives have a message for European cousins who have long looked on in envy at the highly connected Asian market: Be careful what you wish for.

South Korea, the world's most wired country with 30 percent of its 50 million mobile users on superfast networks, has inspired many European operators ahead of their own rollout of networks based on LTE, or fourth-generation technology. But SK Telecom Co Ltd, the country's largest operator with more than half of the market, and second player KT Corp, told Reuters that although the rollout of faster networks had been good for consumers, they were still struggling to make money on the technology 18 months after launch.

"Our European colleagues complain that the explosion in data has not fully happened for them, that it did not come to reality," Suk-Chae Lee, the head of KT Corp, told Reuters at the Mobile World Congress on Tuesday. "In Korea, they are data crazy. We have unprecedented demand. We cannot handle it. But the issue we have is that they are not willing to pay enough. So, the fundamental problem is, can we make any money out of it?" South Korea is often held up by European governments as the model they would most like to replicate, with superfast networks enabling millions of people to shop online, communicate and become more productive. The country has three operators who have been forced to fight for every consumer, spending heavily on marketing and handset subsidies and continually offering more for less to lure in and keep their subscribers. "The traffic increases but the revenue does not necessarily follow," SK's chief technology officer Jae W Byun said in an interview."


Submission + - Physicists still confused over how to interpret Quantum Mechanics ( 3

quax writes: Feynman famously quipped that "nobody understands" quantum mechanics. But after almost a century shouldn't there be at least some consensus on how to interpret this theory? Ever since the famous argument between Bohr and Einstein over the EPR paradox, conventional wisdom was that Bohr's Copenhagen Interpretation will carry the day, but when surveying 33 leading experts at a quantum foundation conference, less than half voted that way.

Is it time for yet another paradigm change?


Submission + - How H-1B Visas Are Screwing Tech Workers (

hessian writes: "To be sure, America's tech economy has long depended on foreign-born workers. "Immigrants have founded 40 percent of companies in the tech sector that were financed by venture capital and went on to become public in the U.S., among them Yahoo, eBay, Intel, and Google," writes Laszlo Bock, Google's senior VP of "people operations," which, along with other tech giants such as HP and Microsoft, strongly supports a big increase in H-1B visas. "In 2012, these companies employed roughly 560,000 workers and generated $63 billion in sales."

But in reality, most of today's H-1B workers don't stick around to become the next Albert Einstein or Sergey Brin. ComputerWorld revealed last week that the top 10 users of H-1B visas last year were all offshore outsourcing firms such as Tata and Infosys. Together these firms hired nearly half of all H-1B workers, and less than 3 percent of them applied to become permanent residents. "The H-1B worker learns the job and then rotates back to the home country and takes the work with him," explains Ron Hira, an immigration expert who teaches at the Rochester Institute of Technology. None other than India's former commerce secretary once dubbed the H-1B the "outsourcing visa.""

Submission + - NASCAR Tries To Squelch Video of Spectators Injured by Crash 1

An anonymous reader writes: Dozens of fans attending a NASCAR race at Daytona Speedway were injured when a crash during the last lap triggered a chain reaction, culminating in the front section of Kyle Larson's car ricocheting into the fence in front of the stands (Larson escaped injury). While the footage accompanying the Fox News story is dramatic enough, an even more riveting clip showing the chaotic scene in the stands from up close was posted on YouTube, but was taken down after NASCAR claimed it violated their copyright . YouTube has since restored the fan's video. A NASCAR spokesman has issued a clarification, saying that the takedown request was done out of respect for those injured. The race was an opening act for the main event, the Daytona 500, which officials say will proceed as scheduled. "With the fence being prepared tonight to our safety protocols, we expect to go racing tomorrow with no changes," Speedway President Joie Chitwood told CNN.

Submission + - Homeland Security Stole Michael Arrington's Boat ( 2

An anonymous reader writes: Michael Arrington, founder of TechCrunch, lives near Seattle and bought a boat there. He ordered it from a company based near him, but across the border in Canada. Yesterday, the company tried to deliver it to him, and it had to clear customs. An agent for the Department of Homeland Security asked him to sign a form. The form contained information about the bought, including its cost. The price was correct, but it was in U.S. dollars rather than Canadian dollars. Since the form contained legal warnings about making sure everything on it is true and accurate, Arrington suggested to the agent that they correct the error. She responded by seizing the boat. 'As in, demanded that we get off the boat, demanded the keys and took physical control of it. What struck me the most about the situation is how excited she got about seizing the boat. Like she was just itching for something like this to happen. This was a very happy day for her. ... A person with a gun and a government badge asked me to swear in writing that a lie was true today. And when I didn’t do what she wanted she simply took my boat and asked me to leave.'
Hardware Hacking

Submission + - The Patents That Threaten 3-D Printing (

An anonymous reader writes: We've watched patents slow down the smartphone and tablet markets. We've seen patent claims thrown against Linux, Android, and countless other software projects. Now, as 3-D printing becomes more capable and more affordable, it seems a number of patents threaten to do the same to the hobbyist and tinkerer crowd. Wired has highlighted some of the most dangerous ones, including: a patent on soluble print materials that support a structure while it's being printed; a ridiculously broad patent on distributed rapid prototyping, which could affect "every 3-D printing service that has launched in the past few years"; and an 18-year-old patent on 3-D printing using a powder and a binding material, held by MIT.

Submission + - Hobby vs Job (

Nassim Amar writes: "There is a growing stigma, at least with the people I hang out with about “work”. The activity is seen as something that you “give-up” everything else for. An attitude that is quite common on the human collective’s consciousness today and I’m very interested in it’s implications. In order to become skillful and create great things, you need to maximize your time doing that said activity. Hence it’s never a sprint but a marathon. Now, how can we enjoy this marathon?

I once read that, once you stop seeing work as work but as a default state then it stops being work altogether, mind the paraphrasing if you can.

I love programming for example. I spent most of my younger years lost in the jungles of computers and circuits. It was definitely “play” at the time and hence devoid of any obligations to anyone, schedule and other “stress” factors, essentially a hobby."

Submission + - Supreme Court Approves Search Warrants Issued by Dogs (

Entropy98 writes: "Today the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously ruled that "a court can presume" an alert by a drug-sniffing dog provides probable cause for a search.

The Supreme Court has not yet issued a ruling in Florida v. Jardines, the other drug dog case it heard last October. Jardines raises the question of whether police need a warrant to use a drug-sniffing dog at the doorstep of a home.

The police can now search anyone anywhere as long as their dog "alerts". Soon coming to your front door as well."


Submission + - Researchers Say Temporary Tattoos Could Enable Electronic Telepathy (

MatthewVD writes: "Noninvasive means of controlling machines via the mind, in the form of stick-on electronics that look like temporary tattoos, could soon enable people to talk over smartphones with only their minds, according to Todd Coleman at the University of California, San Diego. It's become increasingly viable to control devices, such as robotic arms, with brainwaves, but it still requires invasive implants. The new devices can detect signals linked with brain waves through the skin — though with less accuracy. The possibilities are almost limitless."

Submission + - Obama proposes amnesty for illegal aliens (

Examiner News writes: On Sunday, President Barack Obama's plans for immigration reform was leaked to USA Today and discloses an amnesty plan for illegal aliens. The White House plans would allow illegal immigrants to become legal permanent residents within eight years. There are currently between 11 and 13 million illegals in the United States, or roughly 3.8 percent of the total population.

Submission + - Trouble for Microsoft contracts in France by Free Software zealots (

Seeteufel writes: On 5 February 2013, an ongoing renegotiation around Microsoft's "Open Bar" agreement with the French Ministry of Defence became public. A first contract had been concluded in 2009 without any call for tender, and it was not in full compliance with WTO procurement principles. Concerned about national security Free Software Group APRIL wrote to its political contacts, to the Minister of Defence, to Members of Parliament, and to the Senators from the Defence Commission. They hope to raise their awareness and demand utmost transparency.

Submission + - The electric car mistake (

walterbyrd writes: "President Obama repeatedly declared that, with enough federal aid, we can put a million electric vehicles on the road by 2015. His administration has invested about $5billion in grants, guaranteed loans — including $465 million for Tesla — and tax incentives to buyers. . . . Federal billions cannot overcome the fact that electric vehicles and plug-in electric hybrids meet few, if any, of real consumers’ needs. Compared with gas-powered cars, they deliver inferior performance at much higher cost. As an American Physical Society symposium on battery research concluded last June: “Despite their many potential advantages, all-electric vehicles will not replace the standard American family car in the foreseeable future.”"

"I've seen the forgeries I've sent out." -- John F. Haugh II (jfh@rpp386.Dallas.TX.US), about forging net news articles