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Security

Submission + - RIAA Virus

johkir writes: "A recently discovered worm called "Deletemusic" travels via removable disks and spreads to every disk on a machine. When you restart, all files ending in ".mp3" — whether you ripped them from your CDs, purchased them from iTunes or eMusic, or download them via BitTorrent — are deleted. The worm is spreading, albeit modestly, causing a small number of infections. You pretty much have to have no security measures active on your computer, and currently it only travels by disk, but I'm sure an internet transmitted (bittorrent/email/etc) version will be around soon. The authors of Deletemusic remain unknown. Who suspects the RIAA? Or someone who accepts everything the RIAA has said as unbiased truth."
Input Devices

Submission + - The death of the trackball? 2

Loconut1389 writes: I've been an avid mouse user for years, but lately all of the wrist movements have added up and combined with a desire for some added precision when not using my tablet in photoshop, I decided to purchase a large trackball. Logitech makes a few with a small, thumb controlled ball, but it looked like you'd get a tired thumb and have no added precision. After searching around, it seems that the only large one really available is a Kensington for about $90. Only CompUSA seemed to even carry the kensington in-store (and had none in stock).

After ordering one online and using it for a few days now, I don't know how I ever lived with a mouse. The trackball has better precision, less wrist movement, and even gaming is pretty cool/easy with it (can spin it to whip around real quick, etc). All that said, it seems like trackballs have all but vanished except in medical fields (sonograms, etc) and perhaps graphic arts. I'm left insanely curious why trackballs haven't resurfaced now that optical technologies have fixed the main problems of old trackballs (and mice). Do you use a trackball? If so, are you in graphic design?
Security

Submission + - Hacked E-Passports crash readers (wired.com)

Cain writes: "Lukas Grunwald, an RFID expert who has served as an e-passport consultant to the German parliament, says he's succeeded in sabotaging two passport readers made by different vendors by cloning a passport chip, then modifying the JPEG2000 image file containing the passport photo. Reading the modified image crashed the readers, which suggests they could be vulnerable to a code-injection exploit that might, for example, reprogram a reader to approve expired or forged passports."
Windows

Submission + - Windows Vista fixes leaked to net

warpwhistle writes: Microsoft's upcoming Performance and Compatibility packs for Windows Vista have been leaked to the Internet two weeks before their expected release. While it isn't the Service Pack 1 release that Vista users were hoping for, it does take some steps to correct some of the mass-reported performance issues, and adds some extra functionality as well. According to AeroXperience, the service packs fix the serious file transfer slowdowns that occurred in previous revisions of Vista. The site claims that the new fixes improve transfer times by 120%.

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