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Comment Re:I live in the Puget Sound area (Score 1) 506

I recently left Seattle after 4 years, and I hail from Ottawa. I remember about 10 years ago Seattle/Vancouver had something like 60 days of overcast weather-- highest suicide rates that year. I really didn't think the weather was affecting me significantly until I moved to Salt Lake City. Almost immediately my energy level went up, I was sleeping better, my focus was through the roof. Now I know it's also situational (going from a cube farm to start up as well as a change in my personal life), but under no circumstance am I moving back to Seattle.

Comment Re:That's nice, and all (Score 5, Interesting) 128

A couple of months ago, I noticed that Facebook started telling me that I needed to turn on Javascript, even though I had in my allow list in NoScript. I noticed that there was now a second server required, (I checked CIRA's WhoIs and was snatched up by someone else in 2005). I was recently in the states, so I disallowed in NoScript (just to see), and there were no complains about my Javascript setting until I returned north of the border.

This seems to imply that there are separate servers running for Canadians accessing Facebook, so at a minimum, that would give some leverage into forcing them to follow Canada's rules. Now, if those servers are physically located in Canada (no, I haven't bothered doing a traceroute to find out where ends up), that would definitely force them to follow those rules.

Slightly OT, but in my current job and we recently went looking for a new hosting company to host our database (which has a fair amount of private data in it). Because my company gets a large amount of our budget for the federal and provincial governments (it's a non-profit) we like to abide by as many of the federal government rules when it comes to IT and data privacy. One of those rules is any private data must only be hosted in Canada and it can not leave the country. A few companies came to us as "the Canadian branch of hosting company X". The conversations went like this:
Me: Where are your datacenters?
Them: We have them all over the world.
Me: Ok, but in which of those datacenters is our data going to be physically hosted?
Them: We can do distributed hosting so it's in many different datacenters
Me: Yes or no, Are these datacenters in Canadian territory?
Me: So, I'll take that as a no, which means that you know we can't host with you because of the government ruling about hosting private data outside the country.

More and more Canadian companies are taking the approach of hosting only in Canada, if only to ensure that they know the rules for data privacy and know there won't be a conflict between Canada's and the other country's.

You have a massage (from the Swedish prime minister).