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Submission + - Particle Physics Experiment Determines Proton's Weak Charge (

wdconinc writes: At Jefferson Lab, a particle physics lab in Virginia, physicists have determined for the first time the weak charge of the proton. Similar to the electric charge of electromagnetism, the weak charge describes how strongly protons interact through the weak interaction responsible for many radioactive decays. Precise predictions for the weak charge have been around for decades, but this is the first time that its value has been measured! The value agrees with the prediction, but the experimenters have 25 times more data to analyze. With that data they could be sensitive to the same supersymmetric particles that the Large Hadron Collider is searching for. The full paper can be found on the arxiv.

Comment EVO, developed at CalTech for physics community (Score 2, Interesting) 170

You should take a look at EVO . It was developed by CalTech for use in the high-energy physics projects at CERN. It is a Java application, no installation required, but works surprisingly well even with consumer webcams in mac and linux. You can use it for free by just registering and organizing a meeting in the 'universe' group, or you can request that your own organization is added (and still use it for free). It has all necessary features: multiple video streams, collaborative white board, recording and replay, file storage,... At particle physics labs around the world the meeting rooms are basically built around EVO, and polycom has virtually disappeared. It helps if you are close to one of those labs, or on an educational backbone.

Submission + - Utah Cop Tases Man for Speeding

An anonymous reader writes: It's a disturbing trend lately. People are getting tased by cops for just about every infraction imaginable. We're all familiar with most of them, as they have made their way to YouTube, but a recent incident in Utah is especially disturbing. Not only was the man tased for a trivial "crime" (speeding), but the officer in question also refused to read him his rights as he was arresting him, despite being asked repeatedly to do so. From the article:

The victim of police brutality was a motorist named Jared Massey. Mr. Massey was pulled over on a Utah highway for allegedly speeding. When Mr. Massey asked the officer why he was being pulled over, and then to help him understand why he was accused of speeding before he signed the ticket, the officer ordered him to exit the vehicle. Mr. Massey was then asked to turn around and put his hands behind his back. Mr. Massey began walking back towards the car, obviously confused as to why he was being ordered to put his hands behind his back, and less than 10 seconds later was tased.
A video of the incident is available, from the records of the police vehicle.

Submission + - Obama Pledges Support for Open Document Formats (

Andy Updegrove writes: "ODF first made the headlines in Massachusetts when presidential hopeful Mitt Romney was its governor. Now, another presidential candidate has pledged his support for them as well. On November 14th, Barack Obama revealed his detailed IT plan for a more open and technically enabled government in a speech at Google's Mountainview campus. In that speech, he said: "It's no coincidence that one of the most secretive Administrations in history has favored special interests and pursued policies that could not stand up to sunlight. As President, I'll change that. I'll put government data online in universally accessible formats." In calling for open formats, Obama has introduced an IT hot potato into the presidential debate that has already riled the waters in multiple state legislatures and been the subject of heavy lobbying by vendors. Whether other candidates in general — and Mitt Romney in particular — will respond in kind or opt to keep their distance remains to be seen."
Operating Systems

Submission + - Linux kernel v2.6.23 released ( writes: "After 3 months, Linus has released Linux 2.6.23. This version includes the new and shiny CFS process scheduler, a simpler read-ahead mechanism, the lguest 'Linux-on-Linux' paravirtualization hypervisor, XEN guest support, KVM smp guest support, variable process argument length, SLUB is now the default slab allocator, SELinux protection for exploiting null dereferences using mmap, XFS and ext4 improvements, PPP over L2TP support, the 'lumpy' reclaim algorithm, a userspace driver framework, the O_CLOEXEC file descriptor flag, splice improvements, a new fallocate() syscall, lock statistics, support for multiqueue network devices, various new drivers and many other minor features and fixes — see the changelog for details"

Nothing will ever be attempted if all possible objections must be first overcome. -- Dr. Johnson