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Oracle

Submission + - Oracle Database Now On Amazon Web Services (computerworld.com)

CWmike writes: Oracle's database is now available for deployment on Amazon Web Services, the companies announced Tuesday, but with some key limitations. Customers can choose from 'license included' and BYOL (bring your own license) pricing. The first model is priced starting at 16 cents per hour, while the latter starts at 11 cents per hour. Only Oracle Standard Edition One, a feature-limited version of the database, is available under the license-included model. Standard Edition or the flagship Enterprise Edition customers must bring their own licenses. Database replication, which is key for fault tolerance, isn't available yet for Oracle on Amazon, but will be added at some point, Amazon said. 'Mainly, this isn't for production usage," analyst Curt Monash said in a blog post Tuesday. But there might be exceptions, such as with applications that are intended to have a short lifespan in support of a specific project, as well as when 'an application is small enough, or the situation is sufficiently desperate, that any inefficiencies are outweighed by convenience.'
Businesses

Submission + - Mama, they're taking my Kodachrome away 2

wandazulu writes: Kodak has announced that they will stop making the venerable Kodachrome film, after 74 years. While digital has clearly eclipsed the film industry, only Kodachrome was proven to be the medium that could keep its color for decades, while still being viewable to anyone who could hold the slide up to the light.
Data Storage

Submission + - Why are tape drives not scaling with hard disks? 4

An anonymous reader writes: Every 3-6 months, we see an announcement about something adding to hard disk storage. However, tape drives don't seem to be improving on anywhere near the scale of hard disks.

Why is this? Both are magnetic media, and with a tape drive, a manufacturer has far more space to put data on than the platters of a hard disk, and still leave plenty of space for error correction data. Tape drives also don't spin nearly as fast as hard disks, so tolerances involved can be less.
Security

Submission + - Preventing Bike Theft - Innovative Suggestions? 1

victorhooi writes: "I recently (read: 2 days ago) lost a bike to theft, after locking it up with a $30 lock at a bike rack at my local train station.

For my next one, I thought I would canvas the collective wisdom of Slashdot =), for opinions on effective ways of securing a bike.

I've had people suggest U-locks are the best, and others that a heavy-duty chain from a hardware store with a padlock would do it better.

One person suggested somehow welding a car-alarm to the seat post, but I'm not exactly sure how this would work.

Alternatively, one idea I tossed us was using a GPS/GSM module (e.g. one from the Telit range) glued under the seat to send me the coordinates of the bike.

Finally, some people suggested sabotaging the bike somehow. Removing the seat seems to be a common option, but it is ultimately still rideable. Is there perhaps some way of making it so that it won't actually spin? (Most of the elements in the drivechain are tightened down fairly well, for obvious reasons, I can't think of anything that could easily be removed yet still be essential to the bike's operation).

Any thoughts on these ideas, or other suggestions?"
User Journal

Journal Journal: Help Stop BP from Dumping in Lake Michigan

The following is from an e-mail I received from Senator Dick Durbin concerning BP and Lake Michigan...If you haven't already, please go to the link below and let your voice be heard...British Petroleum wants to dump 1,584 pounds of ammonia and 4,925 pounds of industrial solids into Lake Michigan every single day. Their plan represents a massive setback to decades of work to clean up the lake. Over 5,000 people -- including you -- have already emailed BP CEO Bob Malone to ask him to stop this te

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