Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive


Forgot your password?

Submission Summary: 0 pending, 26 declined, 5 accepted (31 total, 16.13% accepted)

Slashdot Deals: Cyber Monday Sale! Courses ranging from coding to project management - all eLearning deals 25% off with coupon code "CYBERMONDAY25". ×

Submission + - Duke Nukem Has Gone Gold (

wandazulu writes: According to Ars: " is a grand day: Duke Nukem Forever has gone gold.

"Duke Nukem Forever is the game that was once thought to be unshipppable, and yet here we are, on the precipice of history," said Christoph Hartmann, president of 2K. "Today marks an amazing day in the annals of gaming lore, the day where the legend of Duke Nukem Forever is finally complete and it takes that final step towards becoming a reality."


Submission + - Apple Kills XServe

wandazulu writes: According to a document provided by Apple, they will no longer be selling XServes after January, 31, 2011, recommending instead to buy a Mac Mini or a Mac Pro with Snow Leopard Server installed.

Submission + - SAP buys Sybase

wandazulu writes: German business software maker SAP AG has agreed to buy Sybase Inc. for $5.8 million dollars, as SAP continues its rivalry with Oracle.

I'll always have a fondness for Sybase; my first real programming job was working with Sybase System 10 on AIX.

Submission + - Google recovers all usage loss since spring (

wandazulu writes: If the last two months should be interpreted as Microsoft suggests, with Bing's gradual ascent in usage share against Google as a sign of Bing's inevitably catching up, then a similar interpretation of September's numbers from live analytics firm StatCounter should be taken as a sign of Bing's ultimate demise. A sampling of five billion or more US page views from Web sites accessed by StatCounter in September reveals that, of the world's top three search services, Google's usage share has climbed back just above 80%, and is flirting with last November's peak of 81.14% — meaning Google is back to serving four out of five US-based general queries.

Submission + - Autodesk vs Reseller: Autodesk loses

wandazulu writes: According to an article at OSNews, Autodesk cannot stop a user from reselling a legitimate copy of Autocad on eBay. The judge in the case said that software was a product to be sold, not licensed. The judge wrote in his opinion "Although Autodesk would no doubt prefer that consumers' money reaches its pockets, that preference is not a basis for policy."

Submission + - New C++ standard delayed until 2010 or later

wandazulu writes: At the end of an article written by the creator of C++ where he talks about removing a feature from the new C++ standard, he drops a bombshell: The new C++ standard (typically referred to as C++0x) has been delayed until 2010 or later. What does this mean? No new C++ features like threads, proper enum classes, or hash tables. C++0x is dead, long live C++1x!.

Submission + - Mama, they're taking my Kodachrome away 2

wandazulu writes: Kodak has announced that they will stop making the venerable Kodachrome film, after 74 years. While digital has clearly eclipsed the film industry, only Kodachrome was proven to be the medium that could keep its color for decades, while still being viewable to anyone who could hold the slide up to the light.

Submission + - Unix Turns 40

wandazulu writes: Forty years ago this summer, Ken Thompson sat down and wrote a small operating system that would eventually be called Unix. An article at ComputerWorld describes the the history, present, and future of what could arguably be called the most important operating system of them all.

Submission + - Microsoft Won't Offer SP1 of Vista to Everyone ( 1

wandazulu writes: If Vista detects that your system might have a problem with SP1, it won't offer to install it through Windows Update — but it won't tell you that the patch has been blocked either. APC Magazine asked Microsoft why the service couldn't be more informative, and the answer wasn't pretty

Submission + - Where are the C++ frameworks?

wandazulu writes: Objective C has Cocoa, C# has .NET, Java has its packages, and every scripting language has an extensive library of functionality for handling things like XML, HTTP, encryption, regular expressions, etc. So why is there no likewise unified library of functionality for C++? At this point I can pretty much count on having a standard template library for any C++ compiler I use on any platform, but that provides basic functionality, like containers and strings. Why is it that I have to write my own socket-based routines for getting a web page, or hashing a string, etc.? So why is there no unified framework for C++? Is it because it's not "owned" by a particular organization or person? Has anyone even attempted to create a library to rival Java's or Ruby's or Perl's or Python's....

We're living in a golden age. All you need is gold. -- D.W. Robertson.