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Submission Summary: 1 pending, 240 declined, 61 accepted (302 total, 20.20% accepted)

+ - RIP Paul Schenkeveld->

Submitted by walterbyrd
walterbyrd writes: Posted in open-bsd mic list:

It is very sad to have to communicate that our friend, Paul Schenkeveld, has passed away.

Just recently Paul held a tutorial at AsiaBSDcon 2015; as we know he enjoyed — or rather lived for — BSD conferences. He was particularily proud of the 2011 EuroBSDcon in Maarssen, for which he was the prime organizer. The Stichting EuroBSDcon (the Foundation behind every EuroBSDcon since then) came to life in the aftermath of the 2011 con, Paul was the driving force. He always wanted to create a community event for everybody involved with the BSDs, in particular, he always wanted EuroBSDcon to be a conference for ALL the BSD-derived Operating Systems, in a fair and balanced way. This desire last not least led him to get me on the foundation board.

Let us remember him for his enthusiasm, his warm and open nature, his endless desire to help where possible, and his accomplishments.

Just two weeks ago I had a very long, private conversation with him in Tokyo. I can't believe this should have been the last time to talk to each other. I've lost a great friend.

Rest in peace, Paul.

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+ - The systemd Project Forks the Linux Kernel->

Submitted by walterbyrd
walterbyrd writes: Now it appears as though the systemd developers have found a solution to kernel compatibility problems and a way to extend their philosophy of placing all key operating system components in one repository. According to Ivan Gotyaovich, one of the developers working on systemd, the project intends to maintain its own fork of the Linux kernel. "There are problems, problems in collaboration, problems with compatibility across versions. Forking the kernel gives us control over these issues, gives us control over almost all key parts of the stack."
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+ - Windows 10 to make the Secure Boot alt-OS lock out a reality->

Submitted by walterbyrd
walterbyrd writes: At its WinHEC hardware conference in Shenzhen, China, Microsoft talked about the hardware requirements for Windows 10. The precise final specs are not available yet, so all this is somewhat subject to change, but right now, Microsoft says that the switch to allow Secure Boot to be turned off is now optional. Hardware can be Designed for Windows 10 and can offer no way to opt out of the Secure Boot lock down.
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+ - Here's Why Patents Are Innovation's Worst Enemy->

Submitted by walterbyrd
walterbyrd writes: Patents did serve an important purpose during the days when technology advances happened over decades or centuries. In today’s era of exponentially advancing technologies, however, patents have become the greatest inhibitor to innovation and are holding the United States back. The only way of staying ahead is to out-innovate a competitor; speed to market and constant reinvention are critical. Patents do the reverse; they create disincentives to innovate and slow down innovators by allowing technology laggards and extortionists to sue them.
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+ - Behind the White House's claim of 545,000 unfilled IT jobs->

Submitted by walterbyrd
walterbyrd writes: The data comes from Burning Glass Technologies, which analyzes help-wanted ads.

This means that the administration's 545,000 unfilled IT jobs figure is based on the Burning Glass analysis. It arrived at this by counting the number of jobs over a 90-day period leading up to President Barack Obama's State of the Union address on Jan. 20, according to Dan Restuccia, chief analytics officer at Burning Glass.

Burning Glass's approach draws concerns from Hal Salzman, a professor of planning and public policy at Rutgers University, who studies the science and engineering workforce. "They claim they deduplicate, but they don't publish their methodology; there is no external verification," he said.

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+ - The White House's $100M, H-1B funded tech job plan comes under fire->

Submitted by walterbyrd
walterbyrd writes: The White House has established a $100 million program that endorses fast-track, boot camp IT training efforts and other four-year degree alternatives. But this plan is drawing criticism because of the underlying message it sends in the H-1B battle.

The federal program, called TechHire, will get its money from H-1B visa fees, and the major users of this visa are IT services firms that outsource jobs.

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+ - ISIS militant 'Jihadi John' believed to be a computer programmer from London-> 1

Submitted by walterbyrd
walterbyrd writes: The Islamic State militant known as "Jihadi John," who has appeared in several videos depicting the beheadings of Western hostages, is a British man from West London.

His name is Mohammed Emwazi, according to Washington Post and Guardian reports. He was known to British security services, which chose not to disclose his name earlier for operational reasons.

Emwazi graduated from college with a degree in computer programming, according to friends who spoke to the Washington Post. He was a quiet man in his mid-20s who was raised in a middle-class part of London, the paper reports.

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+ - How Congress connives in the offshoring of American IT jobs->

Submitted by walterbyrd
walterbyrd writes: The H-1B visa program is not really about finding scarce talents to fill crucial jobs, but about creating a young, cheap, and indentured labor force. Matloff and other experts say Indian outsourcing firms such as Tata and Infosys aren't the villains of the H-1B saga, but the scapegoats. The parties driving demand for this mess of a program are the Googles, Intels, Microsofts and SoCal Edisons, who reap all the benefits.
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+ - Hedge fund shorts biotechs, then sues those same biotechs to drop share price->

Submitted by walterbyrd
walterbyrd writes: A hedge fund is shorting biotechs, then suing those same biotechs over patent disputes The hedge fund is betting that the lawsuits will cause the biotech share price to drop. This is being done in the name of lowing drug prices for the public good.

Part of that push is a desire to lower drug prices, said the Texan, but it could also be a significant money maker for Bass, whose shorting strategy only makes money if companies fail. "This will change the way pharma companies [manage] their BS patents," Bass said. "The beautiful thing is this will lower drug prices for everyone."

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+ - Apple is reportedly in talks to build its own web TV service->

Submitted by walterbyrd
walterbyrd writes: Apple is in talks with TV programmers to put together its own over-the-top pay TV service, Recode says. According to the site's industry sources, Apple's proposed service would comprise of bundles of programming, secured through deals with content providers and sold direct to consumers, rather than a full TV lineup. Apple has reportedly already shown demonstrations of the proposed service to people in charge of TV programming, but Recode says the talks "seem to be in early stages," with the pricing and release date still yet to be set.
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+ - Patent troll hits major pharma company->

Submitted by walterbyrd
walterbyrd writes: We often hear of patent trolls in the tech industry, but rarely see this from major pharma companies. However, the term applies perfectly to AbbVie's strategy to either prevent Gilead from selling Harvoni or compelling royalties. . .

AbbVie cannot commercialize Harvoni since they do not own any patents to the individual drugs that make up the combination, sofosbuvir and ledipasvir. However, it is perfectly legal to apply for and obtain "method of use" and "utility" patents for products that a company does not own and this is what ABBV has accomplished with its five patents.

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+ - Verizon, AT&T tracking their users with 'supercookies'->

Submitted by walterbyrd
walterbyrd writes: Verizon and AT&T have been quietly tracking the Internet activity of more than 100 million cellular customers with what critics have dubbed “supercookies” — markers so powerful that it’s difficult for even savvy users to escape them.

The technology has allowed the companies to monitor which sites their customers visit, cataloging their tastes and interests. Consumers cannot erase these supercookies or evade them by using browser settings, such as the “private” or “incognito” modes that are popular among users wary of corporate or government surveillance.

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e-credibility: the non-guaranteeable likelihood that the electronic data you're seeing is genuine rather than somebody's made-up crap. - Karl Lehenbauer

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