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Comment: Re: the Qt is vastly superior to .net (Score 2) 223

by walshy007 (#49411467) Attached to: Mono 4 Released, First Version To Adopt Microsoft Code

As you point out, Qt 4 broke source compatibility in a major way -- so obviously it is not the kind of showstopper you suggest it should be.

The transitional period was quite painful for a great number of projects. It was only done because it was a necessary evil at the time.

Compatibility is not something people should jump at the chance to break if it can be avoided unless there is sufficient benefit. It has been judged that there is insufficient benefit to doing so currently.

Comment: Re:Full benefits & Full responsibility (Score 1) 227

by walshy007 (#49367543) Attached to: Nation's Biggest Nuclear Firm Makes a Play For Carbon Credit Cash

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rv-mFSoZOkE> Anything that is radioactive enough to be of a concern can be re-used as fuel.

This whole "but the nuclear waste!" propaganda is nothing but a farce. Let us reprocess the fuel, and we will get every joule of energy out of it we can, and the "waste" becomes rare and expensive elements we current dig up whole swathes of country to find.

Comment: Re:Nothing important. (Score 1) 203

by walshy007 (#49134221) Attached to: What Happens When Betelgeuse Explodes?

as well as being more motivated to do more with her life then being a housewife.

Education without allowing people to question things is otherwise known as indoctrination. If a woman highly values being a housewife, I see no reason to not let her do so.

A lot of people seem to have this mentality of "if they knew what I did/ if they were more enlightened they would make the same choices as me" people are allowed to make different choices in life. There are trade-offs to every decision. What people truly value can be arbitrary.

Comment: Re:Time for men's liberation (Score 1) 369

by walshy007 (#49071287) Attached to: Two New Male Birth Control Chemicals In Advanced Stages

That means we are more likely to be expected to make career and life sacrifices in order to have a family.

Career sacrifices fair enough, but life sacrifices? To many people being a wage slave is not necessarily a good life, and it has been shown repeatedly that a lot of women prefer having a healthier work-life balance than men do.

Managers will expect women with children to take off more time for things like doctor's appointments and will (perhaps unwittingly) take that into consideration when doling out promotions etc.

A majority of women tend to put their children as a higher priority than work (there is more to life than work). If managers notice this tendency in an employee, how is it a problem putting the person more dedicated towards work first?

Raising kids is hard work, sacrifice, expensive and life-long. If you can't even hack the process of finding the person who wants to try to do it with you, what does that say?

A lot of guys are willing to take the time and effort. But the risks and lop-sidedness if the woman decides to leave at a whim can be too high. A growing number of men are becoming aware of the increasing risks involved in partnering with a woman, and after a certain point the risks are not worth the reward.

Quite a few men are willing to try regardless of the risks of course, but in the cases where it doesn't pan out they are often left destitute to the point of suicide. To some people that risk is worth the reward, to others, it's not worth their life.

Comment: Re:Pulseaudio misconceptions (Score 1) 755

by walshy007 (#49064543) Attached to: Removing Libsystemd0 From a Live-running Debian System

and the default of 350hz timer, and pulse works just fine for that.

Funnily enough, jack works just fine too for consumer grade setups.. and you're willing to have 4milliseconds latency like most people use, no kernel recompilation is necessary, just permissions for realtime threads needs to be enabled.

Comment: Re:Pulseaudio misconceptions (Score 2) 755

by walshy007 (#49064525) Attached to: Removing Libsystemd0 From a Live-running Debian System

Jack existed prior to, and has superior functions for (except for one use-case, high latency low power) everything that pulseaudio does.

When pulseaudio was in development I observed some conversation between poettering and a lead jack developer. It became quite clear that poetterring had little to no idea why some of the design decisions being made at the time were quite crazy. Admittedly some aspects were fixed over the years since pulseaudios adoption, but the immense pain they created from the beginning was unnecessary.

It really did come down to a combination of "not invented here" and "tablets are the future! fuck desktops" when pulseaudio was being made.

Comment: Re:That's why the Nintendo PlayStation died (Score 1) 60

by walshy007 (#48882115) Attached to: The Untold Story of the Invention of the Game Cartridge

I don't see how. There isn't enough bandwidth over the Super NES cartridge bus to refill video memory every frame.

There is, but not quite at the full frame size. This is why starfox has borders, it actually does this.

Another cartridge that did this was the Super Gameboy. There is a literal entire gameboy chipset in there, and it is copying the video output to the snes in realtime (again, not the full screen though, there's a border)

Comment: Re:Crop + correction makes this pointless (Score 4, Informative) 192

by walshy007 (#48854033) Attached to: Samsung's Advanced Chips Give Its Cameras a Big Boost

but fixing these effects in the lens is pointless now. The computer can do it better.

You can't fix spatial frequency response with software.

Your picture quality is limited by the worst of the sensor and lens.

There is no use having a kick-ass sensor with shitty optics, and no use having great optics with a shitty sensor.

In regards to the small cameras like on the iphone 6, there are serious limitations in having a sensor so physically small. Having such a small sensor makes lens design for it a great deal easier, but you're paying the price in light collection ability and overall resolution as the system will be limited by diffraction effects far sooner.

Large sensor sites are beneficial in many circumstances, if you have the same amount of pixels in a full 35mm frame and a 1/2.3" system, the 35mm will come off looking far better with a lens to suit.

Comment: Re:What an amazing professor (Score 1) 416

by walshy007 (#48578891) Attached to: MIT Removes Online Physics Lectures and Courses By Walter Lewin

It is rare to find someone so enthusiastic about such content, which in turn makes me want to check out the lectures.

Don't have time until the weekend, and I've seen some of the lower quality links here to videos, but I hear they aren't anywhere near the quality of the 720p rips mit had.

Does anyone have a reliable link to the higher quality clips? Torrent or otherwise?

Comment: Re:dropped that fool and the systemd it rode in on (Score 1) 106

by walshy007 (#48563319) Attached to: Fedora 21 Released

Note that PulseAudio and Jack serve different purposes. Use whichever one supports your needs at that moment. PA happily gets out of Jack's way when you need to do some real-time audio processing.

Jack serves all purposes except one really, low power consumption and massive/varying buffers.

Having multiple devices and multiples streams is an awesome feature that brings Linux a little bit more feature parity with Windows.

We've had that with jack long before pulseaudio was even a thought

There were serious design issues with pulseaudio when first released, I'd seen some of the discussions between poettering (pulse) and davis (jack) it was pretty clear that poettering was winging it without anywhere near as much of a clue about the various design considerations of it all.

Overall the project screamed of "not invented here", there were far better ways to go about the goals without dragging the community through that shitfest.

Now it is certainly a lot better than what it was, but that is not to say that there aren't better ways to go about it, or that the pain it made everyone endure was worth it.

Comment: Re:Yep (Score 1) 450

by walshy007 (#48343279) Attached to: Joey Hess Resigns From Debian

You do realize that not all problems are the same.. right?

And that to different problems, the different properties of different choices can have varying suitability to that task.

tl;dr. systemd is not some omniscient "I will solve every problem" solution. There will be times where it is less suitable than a different option. People who recognize this don't want to have to throw the baby out with the bath water (from dependencies in other software that aren't really necessary) when choosing to use a more suited option to their task.

The anti-systemd integration people seem to still want to be able to choose the best tool for the task, not be forced along a certain path without necessity. Systemd may have plenty of good uses, but to assume it is the best tool for the task no matter the task is just folley.

I think this whole thing would be a non-issue if you could swap out systemd with another system and still have everything function easily.

The pro systemd people seem to never realize that other people may have differing requirements than they do, and dismiss anyone who does as making "a technically inferior choice". I find it very presumptuous to assume that you know every detail of someone elses criteria for a task you've never heard of.

Programmers used to batch environments may find it hard to live without giant listings; we would find it hard to use them. -- D.M. Ritchie

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