Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Why do people listen to her? (Score 1) 584

by wagnerrp (#46748615) Attached to: Jenny McCarthy: "I Am Not Anti-Vaccine'"
No. Ignorance is the ability to learn, combined with the lack of knowledge. I suppose you could claim some genetic trait for motivation that prevents you from going out and acquiring knowledge, but that's a bit of a stretch. Stupidity, on the other hand, is the simple inability to learn, and can be inherited, thus the statement, "Ignorance can be fixed, but stupid is forever."

Comment: Re:Producing them is one thing (Score 1) 88

by wagnerrp (#46710971) Attached to: Samsung Claims Breakthrough In Graphene Chip Design
That is correct. When you excite the outer shell of electrons, causing them to jump to a higher energy state, and allow conduction, you have added energy (heat) to the system. However you want to go about supplying that heat to the system, you have heated it up, and heating it up has in turn make the semiconductor conductive. It is a thermally regulated electric device.

Comment: Re:Producing them is one thing (Score 1) 88

by wagnerrp (#46701915) Attached to: Samsung Claims Breakthrough In Graphene Chip Design
Yes. That is how a semiconductor functions. At low temperatures, you're below the band gap, requiring energy be supplied to excite the atoms, bump electrons to a higher shell, open holes, and increase conductivity. At high temperatures, you're above the band gap, and you can't function because you're always a conductor.

Comment: Re:Producing them is one thing (Score 1) 88

by wagnerrp (#46701869) Attached to: Samsung Claims Breakthrough In Graphene Chip Design

What controls the band gap? Supplying energy to excite atoms and cause electrons to jump to the next shell, opening up holes that increases electrical conduction. What defines the amount of energy in an atom? Heat. What is the measurement for bulk heat density? Temperature. So, as temperature goes down, the heat content goes down, and energy state goes down. The semiconductor becomes an insulator. As temperature goes up, heat content goes up, energy state goes up, and you're now a conductor. Hence, semiconductors are fundamentally thermally controlled electric (thermoelectric) devices.

If your chip's temperature brings the energy level above its band gap, your semiconductor will simply not function, and this temperature is well below your semiconductors functional mechanical limits. If your chip's temperature means the energy level is well below the band gap, your semiconductor will need to run at a high core voltage and consume a large amount of power to bring the energy level (and temperature) of the gates up such that they will conduct and switch.

Comment: Re:Producing them is one thing (Score 3, Insightful) 88

by wagnerrp (#46698121) Attached to: Samsung Claims Breakthrough In Graphene Chip Design

The problem is that transistors are thermoelectric devices. You switch them on and off by heating them up to change their conductivity. Silicon chips can withstand temperatures well beyond the point at which the plastic packages they are mounted to break down, but that temperature is also well beyond their switching point, making them useless as a computational device.

If you could produce a semiconductor that was useful at 3000F, then that would be its normal operating temperature, and you would need to feed it a high enough core voltage to allow it to heat itself up to that temperature to switch.

Comment: Re:here's how stupid this is (Score 1) 146

by wagnerrp (#46696159) Attached to: AMD Unveils the Liquid-Cooled, Dual-GPU Radeon R9 295X2 At $1,500

In fact, heatpipes being a form of phase change cooling, are much more efficient than pumped water at short and medium ranges. The only issue with heatpipes is that the average hobbyiest can't make them themselves, and they require static routing.

There's no problem with convecting your heat near the thing you actually want to cool, so long as you can get enough airflow there.

"The most important thing in a man is not what he knows, but what he is." -- Narciso Yepes

Working...