Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Not surprising (Score 3, Interesting) 381

You haven't worked much as a developer. Having built systems used by tens of millions of users I guarantee you that every time Amazon rolls out an update to the store or cloud software there's an ops person biting their nails hoping the system doesn't die. When Google released Gmail they only allowed each user to invite a certain number of friends in order to slowly ramp up the system. Writing any software that is made to have millions of users on day one is really fucking hard.

On top of that steps 2 and 3 require interacting with external systems who may also not be able to handle load well, and probably use a combination of buggy and poorly documented interfaces, and step 5 requires reading a bill so long that the people who voted for it didn't bother to read it. You're grossly trivializing the problem.

Comment: Re:Standards (Score 1) 152

by w_dragon (#47822331) Attached to: Can ISO 29119 Software Testing "Standard" Really Be a Standard?
It's worse than that. Large companies will lobby government to make sure that not only government contractors must be certified on the standard, so must anyone who sells to certain regulated industries. Want to sell to airlines or food processors, even if it's non-critical software? Hope you're certified.
United Kingdom

UK Prisons Ministry Fined For Lack of Encryption At Prisons 74

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the not-like-prisoners-are-people-anyway dept.
Bruce66423 (1678196) writes The Guardian reports that the UK Information Commissioner has levied a fine of £180,000 on the Ministry of Justice for their failure to encrypt data held on external hard drives at prisons. The fine is nominal — one part of government fining another is rather pointless, but it does show that there's a little bit of accountability. Of course it's interesting to consider the dangers of this hopefully old way of storing backups; but the question of whether we do a lot better now is quite pointed. To make matters worse, one of the unencrypted backup hard drives walked away.

Comment: Re:And how long does it take... (Score 3, Informative) 190

by w_dragon (#47725529) Attached to: How Does Tesla Build a Supercharger Charging Site?
The only places you need quick-charge station are places where people will be traveling long distances. Most of the time people will charge overnight at home. Most highways have areas where you could easily build a huge lot with rapid chargers. I suspect the larger issue most places will be finding and transporting enough power to charge perhaps hundreds of cars at one time.
Power

EPA Mulling Relaxed Radiation Protections For Nuclear Power 230

Posted by Soulskill
from the one-new-member-of-the-x-men-per-100,000-normals dept.
mdsolar sends this news from Forbes: Both proponents and opponents of nuclear power expect the Environmental Protection Agency in coming months to relax its rules restricting radiation emissions from reactors and other nuclear facilities. EPA officials say they have no such intention, but they are willing to reconsider the method they use to limit public exposure—and the public's level of risk.

At issue is a 1977 rule that limits the total whole-body radiation dose to any member of the public from the normal operation of the uranium fuel cycle—fuel processing, reactors, storage, reprocessing or disposal—to 0.25 millisieverts per year. (This rule, known as 40 CFR part 190, is different from other EPA regulations that restrict radionuclides in drinking water and that limit public exposure during emergencies. Those are also due for revision.) "We have not made any decisions or determined any specifics on how to move forward with any of these issues. We do, however, believe the regulation uses outdated science, and we are thinking about how to bring the regulation more in line with current thinking," said Brian Littleton, a chemical engineer with EPA's Office of Radiation and Indoor Air."

Comment: Re:What about on the ground? (Score 1) 468

On the ground this could be easily solved in a number of ways. When a plane goes off-course where it shouldn't be, however, the last-ditch attempt to communicate by the fighters that intercept is a standard set of hand signals. That could be a problem if they can't see the pilots.

Comment: Re:Windows as point of weakness (Score 1) 468

Windows screw up the aerodynamics and force the cockpit to be at the front of the plane, making the most critical controls run the full length of the plane. If the front of the plane were smoother a flight could burn less fuel, the main cost in flying these days. If the cockpit were towards the back a lot of weight could be reduced in control lines to the wings and tail, all that's needed from the nose is wiring for a couple (critical) warning systems.
Books

Want To Resell Your Ebooks? You'd Better Act Fast 72

Posted by timothy
from the semantic-boundaries dept.
Nate the greatest (2261802) writes "Here in the US it is legal to resell your MP3s on Redigi, and thanks to the UsedSoft decision you can resell downloaded software in Europe. But if you want to resell your ebooks you had better act fast. Tom Kabinet launched last week in the Netherlands to offer a marketplace for used ebooks, and it is already getting legal threats. The Dutch Trade Publishers Association (GAU) says that the site is committing piracy and if it doesn't shut down the GAU plans to take it to court. Citing a ruling from a German court, secretary general of the GAU Martijn David said that the question of legality had already been settled. Would anyone care to place a bet on whether the site is still in operation in 6 months?"
Transportation

New Chemical Process Could Make Ammonia a Practical Car Fuel 380

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the plant-engine-hybrid dept.
overThruster (58843) writes A phys.org article says UK researchers have made a breakthrough that could make ammonia a practical source of hydrogen for fueling cars. From the article: "Many catalysts can effectively crack ammonia to release the hydrogen, but the best ones are very expensive precious metals. This new method is different and involves two simultaneous chemical processes rather than using a catalyst, and can achieve the same result at a fraction of the cost. ... Professor Bill David, who led the STFC research team at the ISIS Neutron Source, said 'Our approach is as effective as the best current catalysts but the active material, sodium amide, costs pennies to produce. We can produce hydrogen from ammonia "on demand" effectively and affordably.'" The full paper. The researchers claim that a two-liter reaction chamber could produce enough hydrogen to power a typical sedan.

Invest in physics -- own a piece of Dirac!

Working...