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Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Less Volatile Encryption?

FuzzNugget writes: A recent catastrophic hard drive failure has caused me to ponder whether the trade-off between security and convenience with software-based OTFE is worthwhile. My setup involves an encrypted Windows installation with TrueCrypt's pre-boot authentication, in addition to having data stored in a number of TrueCrypt file containers.

While it is nice to have some amount of confidence that my data is safe from prying eyes in the case of loss or theft of my laptop, this setup poses a number of significant inconveniences:

1. Backup images of the encrypted operating system can only be restored to the original hard drive (ie.: the drive that has failed). So, recovery from this failure requires the time-consuming process of re-installing the OS, re-installing my software and re-encrypting it. Upgrading the hard drive where both the old and new drives are still functional is not much better as it requires decryption, copying the partition(s) and re-encryption.

2. With the data being stored in large file containers, each around 100-200GB. It can be come quite burdensome to deal with these huge files all the time. It's also a particularly volatile situation, as the file container is functionally useless if it's not completely intact.

3. As much as I'd like to use this situation as an opportunity to upgrade to an SSD, use with OTFE is said to pose risks of data leaks, cause decreased performance and premature failure due to excessive write operations.

So, with that, I'm open to suggestions for alternatives. Do you use encryption for your hard drive(s)? What's your setup like and how manageable is it?

Submission + - Using nanoparticles to boil water for less £ (

vswee writes: "Generating steam, typically requires vast amounts of energy to heat and eventually boil water or another fluid. Now researchers at Rice University have found a shortcut. Using light-absorbing nanoparticles suspended in water, the group was able to turn the water molecules surrounding the nanoparticles into steam while scarcely raising the temperature of the remaining water. The trick could dramatically reduce the cost of many steam-reliant processes."

Submission + - Microsoft Kicks Vista To Curb With IE10 (

CWmike writes: "Internet Explorer 10 will not run on Windows Vista, either now in its developer preview form or when the software ships, Microsoft confirmed on Wednesday. The decision makes Microsoft the first browser developer to drop support for Vista, and follows the move last year when it announced Windows XP would not run IE9, the browser that went final four weeks ago. In release notes published Tuesday, Microsoft said that users need to run the IE10 Platform Preview on Windows 7 RTW — the designation for the original 2009 release of the OS — or Windows 7 Service Pack 1 (SP1). The latter started reaching users on Feb. 22. Windows 7 RTW must be updated before it's able to run IE10, said Microsoft. When Vista users try to install the IE10 preview, they see a dialog box that reads, 'Windows Internet Explorer Platform Preview does not support any operating system earlier than Windows 7,' after which the installation process terminates."

Submission + - Wireless Synching, Carbon Fiber Coming To iPod (

RedEaredSlider writes: Apple may be ditching aluminum is its material of choice in future products.

That the switch comes as Apple aims to introduce WiFi syncing to the iPod. Much of the effort at equipping the next iteration of the iPad with WiFi syncing comes from Steve Jobs himself, who is "pushing hard" for the technology.


Submission + - DARPA's new telescope could see the aliens on Mars (

coondoggie writes: "You can bet that if there are little red aliens running around on Mars or spaceships patrolling other planet in our solar system for that matter, a recently powered-up telescope built by the researchers at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency might just be able to see them.

The Air Force, which operates the DARPA-developed Space Surveillance Telescope (SST) says the telescope's design, featuring unique image-capturing technology known as a curved charge coupled device (CCD) system, as well as very wide field-of-view, large-aperture optics, doesn't require the long optics train of a more traditional telescopes."

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