Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop


Forgot your password?
Back for a limited time - Get 15% off sitewide on Slashdot Deals with coupon code "BLACKFRIDAY" (some exclusions apply)". ×

Comment Re:This is not a telephone conversation. (Score 1) 164

It is not difficult to see how posting in a Sasha Shulgin thread might have repercussions for American citizens. For instance, Mr. Opportunist, since both you and I posted in the same comment thread, even though I have no idea who you are and never will, our names are linked in some NSA database. How this can bite you in the ass (albeit, currently at a low probability level) is already public knowledge:

Comment Impulse Control? (Score 1) 397

Must not get sucked into comments. Must stop wasting time on Slashdot. OK, this comment does not count, and maybe I could read just one more story---it may expand my mind in unexpected ways, after all. But I will get to work! I will close this tab and not post this comment. Damn. Hey, I'm kind of hungry. Anyone up for going out to lunch?

Submission + - Where is your taskbar?

nickrjsmith writes: I want to ask slashdotters a question. Where is your task bar? Mine is along the right hand side, top to bottom. I do this as it provides me with more vertical space for browsing docs, webpages etc. After all, it's rare I need axtra space left / right on a wide screen. Where is your placed? Could this be a poll?
Electronic Frontier Foundation

Submission + - Warrantless wiretapping cases at the 9th Circuit (

sunbird writes: The Electronic Frontier Foundation argued several critical cases yesterday before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. Both Hepting v. AT&T and Jewel v. National Security Agency raise important questions regarding whether the NSA's warrantless wiretapping program (pdf summary of evidence) disclosed by whistleblower Mark Klein and implemented by AT&T and other telecoms, violates the Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The full text of the Klein declaration and redacted exhibits are publicly available (pdf). This issue has been previously discussed here (1 2 3 4). The Klein evidence establishes that AT&T cut into the fiber optic cables in San Francisco to route a complete copy of internet and phone traffic to the "SG3" secure room operated by the NSA. The trial court dismissed the Hepting lawsuit (pdf order) based on the 2008 Congressional grant of immunity to telecoms. Similarly, the trial court in Jewel dismissed (pdf order) the lawsuit against the government agencies and officials based on the state secrets privilege. Both cases were argued together before the same panel of judges. The audio of the oral argument will be available after 12noon PT today.

Submission + - Man Faces 75 Year Sentence For Recording Police ( 3

esocid writes: 42-year-old Michael Allison of Illinois could spend the rest of his life in prison for recording police in public. He faces five counts of eavesdropping, a class one felony. The Illinois Assistant Attorney General has joined the case and told the judge that citizens do not have the constitutional right to record police.

Submission + - US Authorities GPS tagging duped Indian Students (

tanveer1979 writes: Indian students duped by the dodgy Tri-Valley university in California have been fitted with GPS radio collars by the immigration authorities.

Scores of Indian students were caught in a scam where the university violated immigration norms and illegally got the students F1 visa and immigration status. To keep a track on the movements of the students, the authorities put GPS radio tags. This is spiraling into a major diplomatic row between India and USA, with the former calling the practice inhuman and unwanted.

Submission + - Sprint Delays Android Update; Customers Revolt. (

vonWoland writes: "Instead of receiving the long waited-for update to their HTC Hero and Samsung Moment tomorrow, Sprint customers were told to shut up and wait in the company's forums today.
Irate Moment and Hero users did the only thing they could: found a Facebook group in protest.


Submission + - Microsoft patents portable applications ( 1

Julie188 writes: On Tuesday, Microsoft was awarded a U.S. patent for "portable applications." The description of this innovative technology? Running an executable file from a flash device. Does this, or does this not, sound an awful lot like running an application from a thumb drive instead of loading it onto your computer? A Microsoft spokesperson offers this clarification: "The patent relates to portable applications that can be executed from a portable memory device (such as a USB flash drive) without impacting the configuration of the computer. The patent is not directed solely to running an application from a flash drive but to running an application from the flash drive without altering the configuration of the computer."

At the source of every error which is blamed on the computer you will find at least two human errors, including the error of blaming it on the computer.