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Comment Re:Waste Disposal (Score 1) 311

Bullshit. I think we're more likely to see a revolution with the current approach. For example, your willingness to destroy industries because you don't think their wages are high enough.

I agree that current approach will lead to ruin. I simply disagree on how to avoid it. Specifically, I'd enact an unconditional and irremovable citizen wage sufficient to live and function in modern society (food, home, water, electricity, car where it's necessary or public transit where it's sufficient, and Internet connection) and then repeal everything except safety regulations (and even those could be at least considerably eased after people got used to the fact that they can afford to say no). This would simultaneously kill industries that relied on exploiting desperate people, guarantee a level of domestic demand, allow pruning of bureaucracy on both public and private sectors and give companies total flexibility in hiring and firing without crushing anyone underfoot while at it.

Basically, ensure there's one armor-plated ox who can fight off the bears, and everyone will likely be better off.

Why do you think the Gilded Age proves your point? That period was the transition from former colonies to superpower. They must have been doing a lot of things right.

Right? That depends. Do you value superpower status more than not having lots of poverty? I don't, so I think Gilded Age sucked.

The classic "we didn't want those jobs anyway!" response. If they're paying someone to do something, then there's some value to it. I suggest letting it going on rather than burning another hole in the economy and society.

Just like there's an upper bound an employer is willing to pay to get job X done, there's also a lower bound to what dire consequences - such as what level of poverty - a potential employee is willing to suffer to avoid doing X. This means that a society where X gets done has some positive utility for the employer and negative utility for the employee compared to one where it won't. The total utility of doing X dips into negative if the upper bound is low, because the negative utility to the employee of doing the job has fixed components, for example wasting their limited time to do things they don't care about.

In other words, your desire to have a cheap Big Mac isn't more important than the pain of someone who just barely prefers flipping them to homelessness.

Comment Re:jobs? (Score 1) 311

hmmm what would you get if you had a scripted physics engine?

You get your average shooter or adventure game, where a mini-nuke will absolutely refuse to do any kind of damage against a perfectly ordinary-looking door. Or, more correctly, the door cannot react except for things it's specifically scripted to react to. By contrast, to a physics engine that door is not a door but a "damageable" and thus the nuke can tell it to suffer damage (or apply force with more advanced engines), as can a stick of dynamite or the player's foot.

Comment Re:Waste Disposal (Score 1) 311

It only "suggests" that if you ignore the obvious like widespread disincentives to employ people in the developed world.

Which were put in place to keep the developed world from falling into a general revolution. Which will simply start again if you remove them.

Or in other words, society made the problem in the first place in part by shutting down said industry. If they didn't do that, then not only would they have those workers, they'd have others employed to provide goods and services for those workers.

Right, so did that actually happen before those regulations were put in place? Why do you Lazy-Fairy fanbois keep ignoring history?

Furthermore, if an industry becomes unprofitable simply because they have to actually pay their employees a decent wage, it seems to me that it wasn't producing any value to begin with. Why should I have to subsidize it, either through food stamps for its employees or through amed might necessary to keep them from revolting out of despair?

Comment Re:jobs? (Score 1) 311

Sorry you can't land one with your BS in Literary History of Transgendered Elves of Valinor.

As it happens, "hard" subjects are easier to automate than "soft" ones. That's why our games have physics engines but stories are scripted. And on top of that, Tolkien's writings specifically - which are mostly just histories of Middle-Earth - have made around $5 billion from the LotR and Hobbit movie trilogies alone.

Comment Re:i think it shows trends in GitHub's demographic (Score 1) 131

A side comment here: the "= 0" seems bizarre. Back when it was created the mantra was to avoid new keywords [at any cost]. Wouldn't "virtual void fnc() pure;" or "pure virtual void fnc();" be easier to grasp?

How about "unimplemented"? Why try to come up with witty synonyms when there's a perfectly accurate word in the English language already? Especially since "pure" already has a completely different meaning in relation to functions: it's a function that has no side effects and returns a value that depends only on the parameters.

By the same token, "virtual" is less clear than "overridable".

My notion is that any public class hierarchy that allows fncX4 from class X to show up in class Z without an explicit definition in Z violates encapsulation.

Suppose W is a private member of X. Suppose the author of W changes some public function W.f which X relies on so that another function X.g develops a bug. Has encapsulation been violated? Remember that any complete and unambigious definition of W.f is itself already an implementation.

If your code references any outside code in any way, it can be broken by unexpected changes in that outside code. That loss of control is the price you pay for not coding everything yourself. It's not avoidable by any means whatsoever.

However, it seems like your specific complaint could be solved with a simple addition of syntactic sugar: "private X someName (exports: public: fncX1, fncX2, fncX3)" which would make compiler generate the corresponding proxy functions for you (or better yet, just make Z.fncX1 be a synonym for Z.someName.fncX1 for all purposes except checking for access permission).

Comment Re:Would you guys be as poutraged for a Klansman? (Score 1) 187

Why the First Amendment, of course.

Eh? That needs explaining.

From the very previous sentence: "What gives us the right to extend its legal definition from what a religion - or a set of religions - says marriage should be?"

Notice the word "legal" there? The issue is not whether you recognize same-sex marriage as valid, the issue is whether the law does. And the law is subject to First Amendment, which specifically excludes religious law.

The state's power to do what? Tell people that they can't willy nilly change the meanings of words?

To have anything whatsoever to do with marriage. Specifically, to recognize it as affecting one's legal status in any way. The state can't do that without having a legal definition of marriage (because otherwise how can it tell if you're married or not?), and it can't simply leave that up to your church's word because that would be making a law "respecting an establishment of religion", which the First Amendment forbids.

Comment Re:Very sad - but let's get legislation in place N (Score 1) 705

This should create the head of steam required to get some legislation passed to make companies and specific executives SUFFER if they screw up their data security. Ultimately that means if an executive is advised that a system is insecure, fails to act and it gets hacked, the executive needs to personally liable, with a small taste of prison. It happening once is all that is required....

That will simply mean executives make darn sure no one will dare give them such advice.

No, what's required is understanding that handling identities is a specialized task with the consequences of failure being a matter of life and death. In other words, it needs mandatory insurance - anyone's name gets out, they get paid massive mandatory damages sufficient to start a new life if they so choose regardless of whether they actually come to any harm, and the insurance company then handles punishing the culprit by trying to recover their money either through the courts or through higher rates.

Comment Re:Finally! (Score 1) 113

Ignoring the political aspect for a moment, isn't this a simple TOS violation? Twitter offer a feature (deleting tweets) and these guys are using their API access to subvert it. It's hardly surprising that they were blocked.

Twitter is claiming they have a feature - taking back something after it has been published on the Internet - which they have no way of delivering. Politwoops highlighted this fact. So no, it's not surprising they got blocked.

Going back to the politics, are you arguing that Twitter should remove the delete button from its service? That would be fine of course, I'm just asking if you think that is what they should do, or if you think it should be up to third party services to selectively archive everything certain people of interest say and then change their mind about.

Which is more important, Twitter's ability to deliver shareholder value or the public's ability to know what their elected representatives actually believe, rather than whatever PRotoshopped image they wish to project? Gee, I wonder.

Comment Re:i think it shows trends in GitHub's demographic (Score 1) 131

Inheritance violates encapsulation. If you have three classes X, Y, and Z (X is the base class, Y inherits from X, and Z inherits from Y), and each has various fncX1/fncX2/..., fncY1/fncY2/..., and fncZ1/fncZ2/... Now, you instantiate class Z. Then, when you use Z.fncX1 you're violating encapsulation because you're having to have [incestuous] knowledge of how Z was implemented in order to know that is has [by virtue of a two level inheritance from X] that Z.fncX1 is valid.

But how does that violate encapsulation? You yourself talked about the difference between "is a" and "has a". "Is a" is not an implementation detail, it's a declaration about the API of the class.

Comment Re:i think it shows trends in GitHub's demographic (Score 1) 131

There's nobody who uses CSS without HTML

JavaFX uses something that looks a little bit like CSS. In fact CSS is theoretically applicable to any kind of hierarchical scene graph, you just need to define what object types exist and what properties they have. You'd think that'd be more widespread nowadays, when every project requires programmers and multiple artists to work together and modding is all the rage.

Comment Re:Would you guys be as poutraged for a Klansman? (Score 1) 187

What gives you the right to extend the definition of marriage?

What gives us the right to extend its legal definition from what a religion - or a set of religions - says marriage should be? Why the First Amendment, of course.

You don't get to call upon state's power without being subject to its checks and balances. Think very carefully what victory over that would cost you.

Comment Re:Mozilla, please stop destroying yourself! (Score 1) 187

I think the problem may be less with Firefox

I assure you, it's not. Using Firefox is a constant hunt for the open tab that's slowing the whole browser down due to 100% CPU utilization. Did I say 100%? No, that would require a multi-threaded design - Firefox is effectively single-threaded, or at least a single thread getting overworked will jam the entire program.

Firefox is losing market share because it has numerous technical problems that show no sign of going anywhere. It's going the same way Netscape and old versions of IE did, and for the same reason: turd polishing only works until someone actually has to use the disgusting thing. And breaking existing extensions will probably be the last straw.

Comment Re:Write yourself in as a character... (Score 1) 95

I think that in most cases, most people don't even care.

It really depends. In Simpons, there's no timewise continuity - the whole town's been nuked multiple times. Instead, the basic elements are the characters and the conceptual realm they inhabit. Those might be refined over time, but Mr. Burn's never going to clean up his act permanently, Bart's never going to grow up, etc. The show doesn't take place in spacetime, it takes place in the realm of myth. And the same is true for most ongoing series - for example, how old is Lois Lane?

On the other hand, a series with a defined endpoint - or a single episode of most series - does take place in a space-time continuum, so continuity matters. For example, if the God-Emperor of Mankind showed up to duel Emperor Palpatine in the climatic battle of the Return of the Jedi, it would be awesome but also effectively destroy the movie.

Of course, most continuity errors are subtle glitches that only come to light after careful analysis. These can actually end up enhancing the work by providing both a motivation and points of attachment for fan works. These fan works can then be further refined by other fans, with the best ideas eventually becoming attached to the work's image (fanon) in popular culture. This process is not only entertaining to the participants, but can easily turn a mediocre work to a hit; there simply isn't a turd so disgusting that enough cycles of de- and reconstruction wouldn't turn it into a delicious raisin, as long as there's enough people willing to touch it to get the process started. My Little Pony franchise is probably the most (in?)famous recent example, but it's also how you get from a genocidal tribal god to Jesus, and is what ultimately underlays current culture wars.

Humanity can be regarded as a kind of distributed supercomputer with individual humans as computing nodes, and stories we tell as intermediate results that keep getting evaluated, altered, and combined with other results to produce further ones. The process kicked into high gear with freedom of speech, and the Internet is a fancy new high-speed bus combined with storage space. Any even remotely popular series is going to have more fan works than a human can consume in their lifetime, and a fraction of those will be higher quality than the original work - and inspire new works in their turn. Copyrights currently hinder realizing the full potential of this self-organizing worldwide cultural factory somewhat, which is one of the many reasons they are mostly just disregarded.

So, people do care about continuity, just like they do about all ingredients, but the trick is putting the right amount there. A work with perfect continuity - no errors and nothing unexplained - has no room to grow and is thereby dead. Perhaps some authors wish to keep total control to themselves, and thus end up trying to fill every gap with midichlorians and Boba Fett clones, but ultimately they simply end up sabotaging their own legacy that way. If you wish to have one, you better hope your work catches on and serves as a seed for the tree and perhaps a whole forest to come. But it's not going to be just your tree, and that's something some people can't accept, ultimately to their own loss.

Comment Re:What paradox? (Score 1) 136

Paradoxically, if they slowed their speed...

...then they'd presumably be advanced enough to understand special relativity and take account for it in all their calculations.

Would they? A photon's momentum is a function of its frequency, thus an object in motion relative to the CMB - one who sees one half of the sky blueshifted and the other redshifted - is going to effectively experience friction and come to an asymptotic halt eventually.

Of course, that is going to take a very long time. And that rises a question: do we have an effective velocity relative to CMB? That is, do we see it blueshifted in one direction and redshifted in the opposite? Because Earth orbits the Sun, Sun orbits the Milky Way, Milky Way orbits the local cluster... We should have an easily measurable nonzero velocity relative to the local Hubble flow.

Real Programs don't use shared text. Otherwise, how can they use functions for scratch space after they are finished calling them?

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