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Comment: Re:Amazing technology for its time (Score 1) 106

by viridari (#37341626) Attached to: 1970s Polaroid SX-70 Cameras Make a Comeback

The camera body was also a miracle of engineering design because of the way it could fold flat for storage, but pop open in just the right manner for all the optical paths to work (including the SLR aspect).

Actually the folding feature was quite an old and mature technology by the time the SX-70 was released. Before consumers really took on to the 35mm format, medium format folding cameras were quite popular. The technology was pretty mature by the time my grandfather took his folding camera to WW2, and certainly by the 1950's when my own Zeiss-Ikon Super Ikonta 533/16 was manufactured.

Fuji still makes a medium format folding camera today, but it's priced for wealthy enthusiasts.

Biotech

Hybrid Human-Animal DNA Experiments Raise Concerns 311

Posted by Soulskill
from the wonder-what-al-gore-thinks-about-this dept.
Kevin Fishburne writes "British scientists are calling for a new agency to oversee the mixing of human and animal DNA, which is progressing at a rate most may not be aware of: 'Among experimentation that might spark concern are those where human brain cells might change animal brains, those that could lead to the fertilization of human eggs in animals and any modifications of animals that might create attributes considered uniquely human, like facial features, skin or speech. ... Some disagree. "We think some of these should be done, but they should be done in an open way to maintain public confidence," said Robin Lovell-Badge, head of stem cell biology and developmental genetics at Britain's Medical Research Council, one of the expert group members. He said experiments injecting human brain cells into the brains of rats might help develop new stroke treatments or that growing human skin on mice could further understanding of skin cancer.'"

Comment: Re:You mean that cell phone store? (Score 3, Informative) 413

by viridari (#36272786) Attached to: RadioShack Trying To Return To Its DIY Roots

Now, there's no choice but to go to DigiKey and Mouser, and figure out how I'm going to meet their minimum order requirements, when all I wanted was $5 worth of stuff.

Poo to that! There are a ton of small shops on the 'net that cater to enthusiasts and will sell small quantities of components to you quite happily.

  • http://www.sparkfun.com/
  • http://www.makershed.com/
  • http://store.fungizmos.com/
  • http://www.adafruit.com/

Though for bread & butter components that I am going to use pretty regularly, I'll buy those on eBay. Mostly from Chinese sellers but sometimes there are some stateside sellers competing for your business. Most of the time I get my components in from China within a week or two. I've actually had them beat Sparkfun to my mailbox when I place orders on the same day. Sometimes things get held up and you can wait a few weeks. So don't be in a rush if you go the eBay/China route.

Earth

Volcano Erupts In Iceland 191

Posted by Soulskill
from the end-of-times-underway dept.
Reports are coming in that a volcano in Iceland called Grimsvotn has erupted, sending plumes of smoke 15km into the air. It was accompanied by a series of earthquakes, but all of them have been minor so far, and scientists don't believe the eruption will cause problems for air travel like 2010's Eyjafjallajokull event. Local coverage in Icelandic is available, as well as early pictures of the eruption.
Privacy

Obama Calls For New Privacy Bill of Rights 217

Posted by samzenpus
from the l33t-amendment dept.
CWmike writes "The Obama Administration is backing a new data privacy bill of rights aimed at protecting consumers against indiscriminate online tracking and data collection by advertisers. In recent times, high-profile examples of a need for improving privacy laws include Facebook's personal data collection practices and Google's problems over its Street View Wi-Fi snooping issue. In testimony prepared for the Senate Committee on Commerce Science and Transportation, the Commerce Department's assistant secretary, Lawrence Strickling, said that the White House wants Congress to enact legislation offering 'baseline consumer data privacy protections.' Strickling said the administration's call for new online privacy protections stems from recommendations made by the Commerce Department in a paper released in December. The administration's support for privacy protections is very significant, said Joel Reidenberg, a professor at Fordham Law School who specializes in privacy issues. 'This is the first time since 1974 that the U.S. government has supported mandatory general privacy rules,' Reidenberg said."
The Media

Wikipedia Reveals Secret of 'The Mousetrap' 244

Posted by timothy
from the take-that-wikileaks dept.
Hugh Pickens writes "CIOL reports that Wikipedia has revealed the secret of Agatha Christie's famous murder mystery 'The Mousetrap' by identifying the killer in the world's longest running play, now at over 24,000 performances ever since its maiden performance in 1952, despite protests from the author's family and petitions from fans who think the revelation is a spoiler. Angry at the revelation, Matthew Prichard, Christie's grandson, who describes the decision of Wikipedia as 'unfortunate,' says he will raise the matter with the play's producer, Sir Stephen Waley-Cohen. 'My grandmother always got upset if the plots of her books or plays were revealed in reviews — and I don't think this is any different. It's a pity if a publication, if I can call it that, potentially spoils enjoyment for people who go to see the play.' Unrepentant, Wikipedia justifies the decision to reveal the ending of the play. 'Our purpose is to collect and report notable knowledge. It's exceedingly easy to avoid knowing the identity of the murderer: just don't read it.'"

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