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Handhelds

+ - Linux-based iPhone killer to ship in March

Submitted by
An anonymous reader writes "FIC has announced an on-sale date for its Neo1973, expected to be the first low-cost, high-volume phone with a user-modifiable Linux-based operating system. Like Apple's iPhone, the Neo1973 is a GPS-enabled mobile phone with a high-resolution screen, but no hardware keypad. Unlike the iPhone, it'll cost $350 instead of $700, and have an open rather than closed Unix OS."
Handhelds

+ - Are eInk displays the future?

Submitted by
An anonymous reader writes "This week a company called Polymer Vision, which used to be part of Philips, unveiled a fully functional and soon to be commercially available eInk display. What makes this display special, though, is its ability to be rolled up so that you can store it in a smaller package than current large screen handheld devices. The problem, however, with eInk displays is that they can only display greyscale at the moment and they don't support video either. This begs the question, will consumers be put off by non-colour screens that don't play video or will the extra battery life, small form factor and easy-to-read functionality prove too tempting an offer?"
Technology (Apple)

+ - Telstra to Apple - "Stick to your knitting"

Submitted by
curmi
curmi writes "The Sydney Morning Herald reports that Telstra, Australia's biggest telecommunications company and previously hot favourite to add the iPhone to their network, has told Apple "Stick to your knitting" with regards entering the mobile phone business. Telstra's operations chief says of the iPhone "I think people overreacted to it — there was not a lot of tremendously new stuff" and suggests that other mobile phone manufacturers will have similar functionality soon anyway. With Telstra having the only EDGE network in the country, will this delay access to the iPhone in Australia as Apple updates the hardware for 3G networks?"
Supercomputing

+ - D-Wave Demonstrates First Quantum Computer

Submitted by
ThinSkin
ThinSkin writes "Canadian-based hardware company D-Wave gathered at the Computer History Museum on Tuesday to demonstrate the "16-qubit" Orion, the world's first commercially viable quantum computer. Orion is governed by an analog processor that uses quantum mechanics, unlike digital processing found in conventional computers. During the presentation, chief executive Herb Martin reassured the audience, most notably full of computer industry execs, that quantum computing will not replace its digital counterpart, but will indeed require it to run classic algorithms and do pre-processing. While quantum computing has been claimed to factor large numbers 10,000 times faster than digital computers, Orion was tasked to solve three relatively easy puzzles: search for molecular structures that match a pre-selected caffeine molecule, create a complicated wedding seating plan with stipulations about who could sit where, and finally successfully fill in various Sudoku puzzles."
Movies

+ - The Top 12 Movies that Were Ahead of Their Time

Submitted by
Alex Billington
Alex Billington writes "What makes a movie years down the road be referred to as ahead of its time? It's the visual effects and technical achievements that the filmmakers implemented, from the miniatures in Star Wars to the time-freezing camera system in The Matrix, these movies were vastly ahead of their time. FirstShowing.net has comprised a comprehensive list of the top 12 movies in history that were ahead of their time, ranging from Psycho and 2001 to The Matrix."
Spam

+ - Is there any reason to report spammers to ISP's?

Submitted by marko_ramius
marko_ramius (24720) writes "For years I've been a good netizen and reported spam that I get to the appropriate contacts at ISP's. In the entire time that I've done this I've gotten (maybe) 5 or 6 responses from those ISP's informing me that they have taken action against the spammer.

In recent years, however, I haven't gotten any responses.

Are the ISP's so overwhelmed with abuse reports to respond to ANYBODY that reports spam? Do they even bother acting on the reports?

Is there any real reason to report spammers?"
Biotech

+ - Is Hamster at Home a Viable Idea?

Submitted by
SoyChemist
SoyChemist writes "The culture of the computing community almost always seems to evolve faster than other scientific disciplines. How long will it be before we see distributed volunteer efforts in drug discovery, materials science, and other fields of inquiry that require real wet lab work? Bioethics aside, it would be mighty nice if people could enlist their pet hamsters in animal testing experiments when they become ill. They could be sent a kit with a little hamster size syringe and instructions for supplying their fuzzy little friend with an experimental medication."

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