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Comment: Re:Language shouldn't push you past the limit (Score 2, Insightful) 407

by verdante (#31479380) Attached to: Good Language Choice For School Programming Test?

Having competed in a handful of collegiate programming contests about 10 years ago, the CPU time limit was never even a passing concern. Granted, we were coding in C++, but even in Python, any solution that hits the CPU limit on these contests is quite likely an unnecessarily complex algorithm.

Python makes for much faster coding and debugging and works on many problems. But there's a whole range of contest problems bomb out in Python:

1) Large inputs or outputs and short time limits. Python's "print" statement is simply not fast enough for large-output problems.

2) Billions of booleans. In C++ you would use bitboards and bitarrays, maybe a 100MB worth. Using native Python data structures the memory can run into gigabytes. Using numpy, the bit-twiddling will still be many times slower.

3) Some problems with tight loops and a time limit is set at a couple times the speed of the author's C or Java solution. Python being 10x slower on such loops takes it over the time limit.

Comment: We swiched from FAST ESP to Apache Solr (Score 2, Interesting) 146

by verdante (#31083544) Attached to: Microsoft Phasing Out FAST Search For Linux, Unix

I've been runing FAST ESP 5 clusters on RHEL for since 2008, used for web and site search. I found FAST ESP 5.2 especially to be terribly buggy on large deployments, and some issues their support never did resolve.

Moving to a unit that just needed to search a db, we ran ESP 5.3 for a year, but have now switched completely to Apache Solr. For searching records from a database, Solr does everything we need without gouging the company for $$$$$$ in annual support fees.

In just a few weeks we were able to set up a Solr cluster, integrate it using SolrNet, and tune Solr to produce excellent relevant results with very flexible matching. Relevance is excellent because we could tune Solr's ranking algorithm - FAST ESP was always a black box. Over about a week we tuned the parameters, and Solr now delivers better results than FAST ESP did on our data.

Government

UK Wants To Phase Out Checks By 2018 796

Posted by samzenpus
from the cash-or-credit dept.
The board of the UK Payments Council has set a date to phase out checks in a bid to encourage the advance of other forms of payment. They added, however, that the target of Oct. 2018 would only be realized if adequate alternatives are developed. "The goal is to ensure that by 2018 there is no scenario where customers, individuals or businesses, still need to use a cheque. The board will be especially concerned that the needs of elderly and vulnerable people are met," the Payments Council said in a statement.

Comment: Python comments/docstrings need a lot more (Score 1) 660

by verdante (#30128108) Attached to: If the Comments Are Ugly, the Code Is Ugly
In Python, long comments are necessary in any public-facing code.
1) Due to the dynamic duck-typing, the docstring is the only place where you can explain to the world the exact structure and conditions of each parameter and the return value, especially if you are returning a dict that maps pairs of records to vectors.

2) The docstrings are where you put the doctests, which form an executable mini-unit-test and mini-tutorial for every public API. doctests also mean you have to write the code with few explicit dependencies (or spend most of the test lines mocking them out).

A 4-parameter public API function easily needs:

1 line (maybe 2) for description, followed by 1 blank line
+4*2 lines for the :type: and :param: descriptions
+2 lines for :rtype: and :return: descriptions
+5 lines or more for the >>> doctest lines
>=17 lines of comment per such function

Comment: Re:What the bets the first release will be... (Score 1) 416

by verdante (#30095546) Attached to: Synthetic Stone DVD Claimed To Last 1,000 Years

This is scapegoating, not justice.

If I get caught for speeding and my dad chooses to pay the fine, is this scapegoating, or is this love? The judge only requires that the fine be paid. My dad chooses to pay for me so that I remain free because I cannot afford the fine. This is love, not scapegoating.

Except in this case its like your dad is the son of the Judge and the "fine" is Death with a capital "D" (and quality time with some demons, like a normal jail, right?). Wait, except the Judge *is* the son too, and so is your dad. Uh oh.

Real programs don't eat cache.

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